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Jean-Marie Galing

Art Resource Teacher
Fairfax County Public Schools
Primary (5 to 8 years old), Elementary (9 to 12 years old), Middle School (13 to 15 years old), High School (16 to 18 years old)
Teacher/Educator, Curriculum Developer
Visual Arts, Arts :

Jean-Marie Galing's collections

 

Superheroes

<p>Look at some of these super heroes and discuss:<br /></p><p></p><ul><li>Physical traits/personality traits</li><li>Pose or gesture of the hero</li><li>How did the artist exaggerate something to symbolize the hero's traits or abilities?</li></ul><p>If you could be a super hero, what talent or ability would you use in a SUPER way? How would you show it in a drawing? <br /></p><p></p><p></p>
Jean-Marie Galing
19
 

Human Figure: Abstract vs. Realistic

<p>Look at the artworks and decide which are realistic and which are abstract. Play the sorting game and put the images in the right folder.</p> <p><br /></p>
Jean-Marie Galing
19
 

Time

<p>The theme of TIME can be explored in art using key concepts throughout the semester or year. Explore various concepts related to the idea of TIME by playing the Connections Card Game. The mind maps made after playing the game can be used as a reference throughout the course. </p> <p>Teacher Preparation:</p> <ul><li>Download and print images on card stock (resource attached to this collection). Create multiple sets for small groups to play the game.</li><li>Print Key Concept Cards (resource attached to this collection)</li></ul><p>Student Activity:</p> <ul><li>Take turns choosing a card and connecting it to a key concept by placing it near an appropriate Concept Card. </li><li>Defend choice with evidence in the image.</li><li>After all cards have been played, students make inferences about how people experience, measure or represent time. </li><li><span></span> Small groups collaborate to draw a mind map to illustrate their ideas. </li><li>Present maps in a "Carousel Interview." One group member stays with the mind map to answer questions; other group members visit tables to explore mind maps and ask questions.</li><li>Return to original group. Encapsulate overarching ideas and record them on your group's mind map.</li></ul>
Jean-Marie Galing
27
 

Animal Vessels

Jean-Marie Galing
12
 

Abstraction Methods

<p>Artists can abstract people and objects in many ways. Which methods of abstraction can you identify in these artworks?</p> <ul><li>Simplify</li><li>Fragment (or explode; break into pieces)</li><li>Multiply </li><li>Rearrange (move the parts around)</li><li>Magnify (change the scale)</li><li>Distort (change the shape) </li><li>Morph (change into something else)</li><li>Arbitrary Colors</li></ul><p>Art making prompt: arrange some objects to draw. Then choose an abstraction method to create an artwork based on the objects you see.</p> <p></p>
Jean-Marie Galing
21
 

Body Language

<ul><li>How does a person's gaze, stance or the way they use their hands communicate a mood or feeling?</li><li>In artworks depicting two or more people, how are they interacting? What does that say about their relationship to each other?</li></ul><br /><p><br /></p>
Jean-Marie Galing
15
 

Chuck Close Portraits

Jean-Marie Galing
5
 

Playgrounds

<p>Images support learning in primary grade paper sculpture lessons.</p>
Jean-Marie Galing
9
 

Robots

<p>Lesson Prompt: Look at each robot and imagine what it can do. How can it help people? If you were to design your own robot, what would you want it to do to help your family? Sketch your ideas and then draw your robot design. </p>
Jean-Marie Galing
7
 

A Special Place - Woodcut & Linocut Prints

<p>View selected prints of different places, then discuss: </p> <p></p> <ul><li>What is the first thing you notice?</li><li>What do you believe is special about this place?</li><li>How did the artist use composition to highlight what is special?</li></ul><p>Choose one print to examine:</p> <p></p> <ul><li>What kinds of lines, patterns or textures did the artist use?</li><li>How did the artist use tools to create areas of light and dark?</li></ul><p>Apply in your own work:</p><p><br /></p><p></p> <ul><li>What makes a place special or meaningful to you?</li><li>What clues will help capture the uniqueness of your special place?</li></ul><p>ARTMAKING CHALLENGES:</p><ul><li>Draw a picture of a special place using foreground, middle ground, and background. Use a variety of lines and cross hatching to create texture and value.</li><li>Sketch your special place, then transfer the design to a soft rubber printing plate. Using a lino cutter, outline the major areas and cut away areas that will remain light. Use a variety of lines and cross hatching to create areas of light and dark in the prints. Ink your printing plate and pull several prints. </li><li>Create a painting of a special place using foreground, middle ground, and background. Mix tints and shades. Use color to communicate an emotion linked to your special place.  </li></ul><p></p> <p></p> <p></p>
Jean-Marie Galing
14
 

Celebrate Good Times

<p>Images support second grade collage lesson. Choose an image that connects to a poem read to students (from <em>Celebrate American in Poetry in Art,</em> edited by Nora Panzer). Use questioning to describe and analyze the artwork: </p><ul><li>"What do you see?" </li><li>"What is happening here? </li><li><span></span>"What clues make you think that?"</li><li> "What else is happening in this image?" </li></ul><p>Ask students to take a minute to think of a personal experience that this image reminds them of, then turn to a partner and share. This prepares them for the next step, which is to visualize a favorite community celebration and sketch in preparation for making a collage.</p>
Jean-Marie Galing
5
 

Portraits of Children

<p>Images support primary grade portraiture lessons.</p>
Jean-Marie Galing
22