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Jean-Marie Galing

Art Resource Teacher
Fairfax County Public Schools
Primary (5 to 8 years old), Elementary (9 to 12 years old), Middle School (13 to 15 years old), High School (16 to 18 years old)
Teacher/Educator, Curriculum Developer
Visual Arts, Arts :

Jean-Marie Galing's collections

 

Figural Sculptures

Jean-Marie Galing
21
 

Reimagining the Statue of Liberty

<p>This collection asks students to explore the importance of national symbols to our cultural, political, and collective identity. By examining the Statue of Liberty, and its many reinterpretations, students will consider difficult questions facing us today: Who is included? Who decides? Why and how do people use national symbols as a way to protest? How have our notions and ideals of liberty changed over time? [Collection adapted from <em>Toward a More Inclusive America</em> collection by Philippa Rappoport.]</p> <p>Included here are </p> <ul><li>images of the artifacts and supporting objects</li><li>suggested Thinking Routines - "See, Think, Wonder," "Think, Feel, Care," and "The 3 Ys" - from Harvard's Project Zero Artful and Global Thinking materials</li><li>supporting interpretive video</li><li>a discussion/writing prompt</li></ul> <p>For use in Social Studies, Spanish, English, Art, and American History classes<br></p> <p>#EthnicStudies #LatinoHAC </p> <p></p>
Jean-Marie Galing
20
 

Landscapes

<p>Choose several images to compare/contrast in terms of location, season, and/or style. Discuss why artists may choose to depict a particular place.</p><p>Formal analysis for elementary students: identify foreground, middle ground and background; describe how size and placement of objects and use of overlapping contribute to the illusion of depth. </p><p>Formal analysis for secondary students: describe color harmonies; identify focal point; find examples of one-point, two point, and atmospheric perspective. </p>
Jean-Marie Galing
29
 

Balance & Symmetry

<p>Which type of balance is represented in each image?</p> <ul><li>Symmetrical balance</li><li>Radial balance</li><li>Asymmetrical balance</li></ul>
Jean-Marie Galing
16
 

Medallions

<p>Work with a partner or partners to analyze each object:</p> <ul><li>What do you think the symbols mean?</li><li>Are there words that help describe it?</li><li>What patterns can you find?</li><li>Does the design show bilateral symmetry, radial symmetry, or is it asymmetrical?</li></ul><p>ART MAKING CHALLENGE: Design a medallion to commemorate something important to you. Some possibilities:</p><p></p><ul><li>An accomplishment</li><li>A special event you participated in</li><li>A family tradition</li><li>A personal interest</li></ul><p>The final artwork could be a drawing, painting, collage, clay slab, or foil repousse.</p><p></p>
Jean-Marie Galing
18
 

Abstract food

<p>Images illustrate how artists use simplification and zooming in to abstract images of popular foods.</p>
Jean-Marie Galing
8
 

Community Neighborhoods

<p>Images support learning in art lessons about the big idea of Community. Compare/contrast urban, suburban, and rural communities. What do all communities have in common?</p><p>Activity: Print selected images on 8.5" x 11" card stock and laminate. Cut each image into several pieces. Number the backs of the pieces and place in a zip-lock bag with the same number. </p><p>Each student receives a puzzle piece and must work with their small group to re-assemble the image. Then make a list of clues about the community depicted. As each group shares their lists, the teacher records responses. Duplicate responses get a tally mark next to the word. </p><p>Teacher can then lead a discussion about what makes a community and help students make connections to similarities with their own local community.</p>
Jean-Marie Galing
13
 

Relationships in Nonrepresentation

<p>What kind of relationship can you find between shapes, colors, or lines depicted in these nonrepresentational artworks? How could they symbolize a real-life relationship?</p>
Jean-Marie Galing
12
 

Visual Tension

<p>Tension in art is represented by a balance between opposing formal elements. (Line, shape, color, value, form, texture, or space.) It can cause anxiety or excitement in the viewer. </p><p>Look at some nonrepresenttional paintings. How did the artists use the elements to create visual tension?</p><p>How could a painting represent the tension someone has experienced?</p>
Jean-Marie Galing
10
 

Controlled Environments

<p>The environments depicted by some artists evoke a sense of control and order.  Look at these artworks by Charles Sheeler, Edward Hopper, and Richard Estes. What formal elements of art or principles of design do you see that support the feeling of control?</p> <ul><li>Elements: line, shape, color, value, form, texture, space</li><li>Principles of Design: balance, contrast, emphasis, movement, pattern, rhythm, unity</li></ul>
Jean-Marie Galing
12
 

Evocative Memories

<p>Memories can evoke strong feelings and  inspire artists to tell stories in their art. Look at a selected image with a partner or table group and discuss:</p> <p></p> <ul><li>What is the story?</li><li>How do you think the person or people feel about this experience?</li><li>What do you see that makes you think they feel that way?</li><li>Have you ever had the same feeling?</li></ul><p></p>
Jean-Marie Galing
13
 

Art from Memories

<p>Compare and contrast artworks by William Christenberry and Robert Rauchenberg:</p> <ul><li>How do they depict the passage of time? </li><li>How are events or environments represented?</li><li>What do these images communicate about control or loss of control?</li></ul> <p></p>
Jean-Marie Galing
12