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Jean-Marie Galing

Art Resource Teacher
Fairfax County Public Schools
Primary (5 to 8 years old), Elementary (9 to 12 years old), Middle School (13 to 15 years old), High School (16 to 18 years old)
Teacher/Educator, Curriculum Developer
Visual Arts, Arts :
Art Resource Teacher

Jean-Marie Galing's collections

 

Reimagining the Statue of Liberty

<p>This collection asks students to explore the importance of national symbols to our cultural, political, and collective identity. By examining the Statue of Liberty, and its many reinterpretations, students will consider difficult questions facing us today: Who is included? Who decides? Why and how do people use national symbols as a way to protest? How have our notions and ideals of liberty changed over time? [Collection adapted from <em>Toward a More Inclusive America</em> collection by Philippa Rappoport.]</p> <p>Included here are </p> <ul><li>images of the artifacts and supporting objects</li><li>suggested Thinking Routines - "See, Think, Wonder," "Think, Feel, Care," and "The 3 Ys" - from Harvard's Project Zero Artful and Global Thinking materials</li><li>supporting interpretive video</li><li>a discussion/writing prompt</li></ul> <p>For use in Social Studies, Spanish, English, Art, and American History classes<br></p> <p>#EthnicStudies #LatinoHAC </p> <p></p>
Jean-Marie Galing
20
 

Visual Tension

<p>Tension in art is represented by a balance between opposing formal elements. (Line, shape, color, value, form, texture, or space.) It can cause anxiety or excitement in the viewer. </p><p>Look at some nonrepresenttional paintings. How did the artists use the elements to create visual tension?</p><p>How could a painting represent the tension someone has experienced?</p>
Jean-Marie Galing
10
 

Family Helper

<p>Images of children performing tasks that help their family. How are these children helping others? </p><p>What do you do to help out at home? Draw a picture of yourself being a helper.</p>
Jean-Marie Galing
6
 

Memorable Moments

<p>Look at the images. . . </p> <p></p> <ul><li>What is happening?</li><li>Who do you think these people are?</li><li>Do you have a memory of doing something similar? </li></ul><p>ART MAKING CHALLENGE:  Create an artwork that depicts a memory of something you enjoyed with family or friends. The artwork could be a drawing, painting, or collage. </p> <p></p>
Jean-Marie Galing
9
 

Postcard Places

Jean-Marie Galing
14
 

Abstract food

<p>Images illustrate how artists use simplification and zooming in to abstract images of popular foods.</p>
Jean-Marie Galing
8
 

Animal Vessels

Jean-Marie Galing
12
 

Symbols

Jean-Marie Galing
17
 

Chuck Close Portraits

Jean-Marie Galing
5
 

Fabulous Fabrics

<p>Use images to introduce a stamp-printing lesson with primary students. Observe selected images and discuss. . . </p> <ul><li>What shapes or lines do you see?</li><li>Which fabrics have repeat patterns?</li><li>Which fabrics have alternating patterns?</li><li>What could the fabric be used for?</li></ul><p>Play a sorting game with images printed on cards. Categories for sorting could include stripes, plaid, checkerboard, floral, polka dot, etc.</p> <p>ART MAKING CHALLENGE: </p> <ul><li>Students will stamp print on paper with cardboard edges, stampers, or found objects to create patterns. </li><li>Printed paper will then be cut into clothing for collage self portraits.</li></ul><p></p>
Jean-Marie Galing
23
 

Maps

Jean-Marie Galing
8
 

Abstract Sculpture

<p>For younger students, play an "I Spy" or sorting game with sculpture images. Attributes to look for:</p> <ul><li>Geometric shapes/forms</li><li>Biomorphic shapes/forms</li><li>Inside/outside sculptures</li><li>Sculptures that resemble animals or people</li><li>Sculptures that don't resemble anything</li><li>Big/little sculptures - explain how you decided this (scale in relation to its surroundings)</li></ul><p>With older students, challenge them to construct a definition of abstraction based on what they observe in the sculptures. </p>
Jean-Marie Galing
23