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Jean-Marie Galing

Art Resource Teacher
Fairfax County Public Schools
Primary (5 to 8 years old), Elementary (9 to 12 years old), Middle School (13 to 15 years old), High School (16 to 18 years old)
Teacher/Educator, Curriculum Developer
Visual Arts, Arts :
Art Resource Teacher

Jean-Marie Galing's collections

 

Woodcut Portraits

Jean-Marie Galing
14
 

William H. Johnson

Jean-Marie Galing
12
 

Visual Tension

<p>Tension in art is represented by a balance between opposing formal elements. (Line, shape, color, value, form, texture, or space.) It can cause anxiety or excitement in the viewer. </p><p>Look at some nonrepresenttional paintings. How did the artists use the elements to create visual tension?</p><p>How could a painting represent the tension someone has experienced?</p>
Jean-Marie Galing
10
 

Textiles

<p>For primary grade weaving lessons</p>
Jean-Marie Galing
14
 

Symbols

Jean-Marie Galing
17
 

Sustainable Textiles

<p>Sustainability is about using techniques that allow for continual reuse of resources. Why might textile designers want to reuse scraps or reclaim waste fibers? What other things that get thrown away could be reused as part of a woven textile? </p> <p>ART MAKING CHALLENGE: Incorporate something recyclable in a hand-woven textile.  Consider color, texture, and how well it will perform for a particular purpose.  Would you combine the recycled items with traditional yarns or just use recycled items? Which method is likely to get the results you want?</p>
Jean-Marie Galing
10
 

Representational, Abstract, or Nonrepresentational?

<p>Introductory Activity: Print image cards for small group collaboration. Students will sort images into three categories:</p> <ol><li>Representational Art (realistic imagery)</li><li>Abstract Art (recognizable imagery that does not reflect actual appearance)</li><li>Nonrepresentational Art (does not represent a depiction of the physical appearance of people or objects)</li></ol><p>Formal Analysis Activity: </p> <p>Choose a few images to compare and contrast: How did the artist use line, shape, color, balance, repetition, or overall composition to convey</p> <ol><li>The illusion of movement or rhythm</li><li>Visual tension</li><li>A mood or feeling</li></ol><p>NOTE: pdf file of these images is meant to be printed front-to-back so that citations will appear on the reverse side of each image. </p> <p></p> <p><br /></p>
Jean-Marie Galing
25
 

Relationships in Nonrepresentation

<p>What kind of relationship can you find between shapes, colors, or lines depicted in these nonrepresentational artworks? How could they symbolize a real-life relationship?</p>
Jean-Marie Galing
12
 

Reimagining the Statue of Liberty

<p>This collection asks students to explore the importance of national symbols to our cultural, political, and collective identity. By examining the Statue of Liberty, and its many reinterpretations, students will consider difficult questions facing us today: Who is included? Who decides? Why and how do people use national symbols as a way to protest? How have our notions and ideals of liberty changed over time? [Collection adapted from <em>Toward a More Inclusive America</em> collection by Philippa Rappoport.]</p> <p>Included here are </p> <ul><li>images of the artifacts and supporting objects</li><li>suggested Thinking Routines - "See, Think, Wonder," "Think, Feel, Care," and "The 3 Ys" - from Harvard's Project Zero Artful and Global Thinking materials</li><li>supporting interpretive video</li><li>a discussion/writing prompt</li></ul> <p>For use in Social Studies, Spanish, English, Art, and American History classes<br></p> <p>#EthnicStudies #LatinoHAC </p> <p></p>
Jean-Marie Galing
20
 

Playgrounds

<p>Images support learning in primary grade paper sculpture lessons.</p>
Jean-Marie Galing
9
 

Play

Jean-Marie Galing
14
 

Outside Fun

<p>See: Where are these people? What are they doing?</p><p>Think: Have you ever done something like that outside? </p><p>Wonder: I wonder what it would be like to go there.  What would I see, smell, taste, touch, or hear?</p><p>Choose an image and imagine yourself being in that place. Then use that as inspiration for a drawing, painting, or collage. </p>
Jean-Marie Galing
10