User Image

Ashley Naranjo

Manager of Educator Engagement and Strategic Partnerships
Smithsonian Institution
Smithsonian Staff
Manager of Educator Engagement and Strategic Partnerships

Ashley Naranjo, M.Ed. is a museum educator, specializing in the use of digital resources for teaching and learning. She currently manages distance learning initiatives and education partnerships for the Smithsonian. She has developed and implemented professional development opportunities for teachers, librarians and fellow museum educators since 2011. Before coming to the Smithsonian, she has had experiences in education in both formal and informal learning spaces: as an ESOL instructor for adults, a middle school teacher in the humanities and a summer programs administrator. She holds a B.A. in Human Development (Developmental Psychology) from the Lynch School of Education at Boston College, where she was a research assistant and independent study student in the Laboratory of Thinking, Learning & Cognition in the Arts. She completed a M.Ed. in Learning Design and Technology from the Rossier School of Education at the University of Southern California, with a thesis entitled, “Using Digital Museum Resources in the Classroom”. She is a 2019 graduate of the Getty Leadership Institute’s NextGen of Museum Leaders program.

Email: learning@si.edu | Twitter: https://twitter.com/SmithsonianEdu

Ashley Naranjo's collections

 

Conducting an Oral History: Tips from Across the Smithsonian

<p><strong>Oral history</strong> is a technique for generating and preserving original, historically interesting information – primary source material – from personal recollections through planned recorded interviews. This collection includes tips for conducting your own oral history from a student journalist and a historian, guides with suggestions for setting up your own interview, and recorded oral histories from key moments documenting a range of events in 20th century history. </p> <p>Recommended questions to consider with this collection of resources: <em>What is the purpose and value of oral histories in relation to understanding historic events?  </em><em>How do oral histories compare to other sources of information? </em><em>How can what we learn in school help us understand and process the experience of today, in the context of history? </em><em>What is our responsibility to document, reflect, and advocate? </em></p>
Ashley Naranjo
16
 

Practice Telling Time

<p>This collection includes a variety of images of clock faces to use with young learners who are practicing skills in telling time with analog clocks featuring Arabic numerals. Teachers can use these images to help students tell and write time to the nearest minute.  The images range from clocks in isolation to clocks used in artworks and finally, clocks in context through photography. Additional resources are included to provide further teaching context on the concept of time.</p>
Ashley Naranjo
25
 

Narrated Stories from Around the World

This topical collection includes fourteen narrated stories, many include visuals, as well. These stories could be used with young children to compare narrative arcs, identify key elements of storytelling, or simply for enjoyment of listening to short stories from around the world, including tales from the Chinese, Blackfoot, Ho Chunk, Cheyenne, Cree, Anikara, Iroquois, Painte, Popul Vuh, artist Romare Bearden's reimagined version of "Homer's Odyssey", Inka, Tlingit and Ghanaian (Asante, Ashanti).
Ashley Naranjo
15
 

National Letter Writing Day- December 7

Learning resource collection introducing some letters in the Smithsonian's collections to provide inspiration for celebrating National Letter Writing Day! Letters can be written for a number of purposes. Here, a few examples are explored including a professional inquiry, a condolence letter, opinion sharing and a love letter. You’ll have access to the transcript of the text, as well as the primary source. Highlight some key facts about each letter to determine its main idea and purpose, by answering some guiding questions.
Ashley Naranjo
8
 

World War II Homefront Posters

Using these wartime posters, students will identify the message of each poster. They will determine the effect of the posters on daily life and the way that average citizens were being called to action to help in the war effort. Finally, students should consider the following questions: Why was it important to have a united homefront during the war? What roles do these posters depict for Americans supporting the war? How did these posters affect opinions and actions during wartime?
Ashley Naranjo
11
 

Spotting Symbols in the Lansdowne Portrait of George Washington

Learning resource collection, which includes an iconic portrait of George Washington, filled with symbols that tell a story about early America and its first leader. Explore the ways that the artist uses symbols in the portrait to tell about the subject’s life, personality, and achievements.
Ashley Naranjo
7
 

Objects that Changed the Way We Live

In this collection, we'll explore everyday objects and their impacts on society. Students can begin by reading an illustrated essay from the National Museum of American History highlighting objects that capture several pivotal moments in innovation. Included in this collection are the clock, the iPod, the bicycle and the cellular phone. What other objects have changed the way we lived?
Ashley Naranjo
11
 

U.S. Presidential Inauguration Resources

This teaching collection includes resources, such as video interviews with expert historians, artworks, memorabilia and photographs of the American tradition of presidential inaugurations, including the Oath of Office, the Inaugural Address, the Inauguration Parade and the Inaugural Ball. Discussion Questions: -How does a U.S. presidential inauguration compare to a royal coronation? -How are these events populist (for ordinary citizens)? How are they elitist (for the high class elite)? -Where can inauguration traditions be traced? -What is required by the Constitution to occur at a presidential inauguration? -What events have become a tradition over time? -What objects help tell the story of inaugurations over time?
Ashley Naranjo
36
 

The Brown Sisters: Forty Years in Forty Portraits

This collection includes a unique series of portraits of four sisters. Every year, for forty years, one of the sisters' husbands captured the four women in a black and white photograph. A New York Times article introduces the project, paired with the forty photographs and some discussion questions considering elements of portraiture that are captured in these images.
Ashley Naranjo
43
 

Forensic Anthropology: Bone Basics

Learning resource collection introducing the skeletal characteristics that can help us identify young and old, male or female, and ancestry. This collection was created with the Anthropology team at the National Museum of Natural History. (http://anthropology.si.edu/writteninbone/bone_basics.html )
Ashley Naranjo
16
 

Unveiling Stories: Marian Anderson in Concert at the Lincoln Memorial

This collection uses the Harvard Project Zero Global Thinking routine to reveal multiple layers of meaning in a set of photographs and artworks. The strategy is paired with photographs and artworks from the National Portrait Gallery, the National Museum of American History and the Smithsonian American Art Museum, as well as a Smithsonian Channel video and two essays recounting the day's events. Using the "Unveiling Stories" routine, along with some guided questions, students will look at a single story from multiple dimensions. Questions for the first two artworks by William H. Johnson are suggested to be answered in a Think, Pair, Share discussion format. Tags: William H. Johnson, Marian Anderson, Easter 1939 concert, Lincoln Memorial
Ashley Naranjo
14
 

Student Activity: Investigating Invasive Species

An invasive species is a plant or animal that has been introduced to an ecosystem and does great damage to its new home. In this activity, students will look at the impact of invasive species on marine ecosystems. Using a global database, students will identify the spread of invasive species. Students will go on to create a  public-service announcement to tell others what they can do to help solve the problem in their local water sources.
Ashley Naranjo
16