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Ashley Naranjo

Manager of Educator Engagement
Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access, Smithsonian Institution
Smithsonian Staff

In 2011, Ashley Naranjo joined the Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access as a museum educator, specializing in the use of digital museum resources, where she develops and implements professional development opportunities for teachers, librarians and fellow museum educators. Her goal is to bridge museum and formal education settings by using museum digital content to deepen learning. Before coming to the Smithsonian, she has had experiences in education in both formal and informal learning spaces: as an ESOL instructor for adults, a middle school substitute teacher in the humanities and a summer programs administrator at an independent school. She holds a B.A. in Human Development (Developmental Psychology) from the Lynch School of Education at Boston College, where she was a research assistant and independent study student in the Laboratory of Thinking, Learning & Cognition in the Arts. She completed a M.Ed. in Learning Design and Technology from the Rossier School of Education at the University of Southern California, with a thesis entitled, “Using Digital Museum Resources in the Classroom”. She is a recent graduate of the Getty Leadership Institute’s NextGen of Museum Leaders program.

Email: learning@si.edu | Twitter: https://twitter.com/SmithsonianLab

Ashley Naranjo's collections

 

New Jersey Principals and Supervisors Association (NJPSA) Arts Integration Planning Tool

<p>Using a sample lesson "The Blues and The Great Depression" provided by the New Jersey Principals and Supervisors Association (NJPSA) as a model, this collection demonstrates how the <em>Smithsonian Learning La</em>b can be a useful tool to curate digital resources that support a lesson for arts integration. </p> <p>In this lesson, students will learn about the structure and content of the blues using songs from the 1930s and the Great Depression.Students will brainstorm circumstances of the Great Depression and use those ideas to create an original blues song from the point of view of someone living during the Great Depression.</p> <p>Essential questions: </p> <p>● How does blues music reflect the challenges of poverty for the African-American experience during the Great Depression?<br />● How do images and songs reflect the emotions of the African-American experience during the Great Depression?</p> <p></p> <hr /><p><em>The original lesson was created by the New Jersey Principals and Supervisors Association (NJPSA) and included in their Arts Integration User Guide for NJ Educators and Practitioners, starting on p. 90 (<a href="http://njpsa.org/documents/EdLdrsAsSchol2018/artsintegrationWorkbook2018.pdf">http://njpsa.org/documents/EdLdrsAsSchol2018/artsintegrationWorkbook2018.pdf</a>).</em><br /></p>
Ashley Naranjo
23
 

Women's Roles During the Civil War

Learning resource collection, in which students identify women's homefront and battlefront roles during the American Civil War, as depicted in Harper's Weekly and a short video from the Smithsonian Channel.
Ashley Naranjo
11
 

Statue of Liberty and Symbolism

<p>This collection includes a variety of representations of the Statue of Liberty--as a protest object, on an environmental campaign poster, on a postage stamp, and as a symbol used on patterned clothing. In small groups, learners will apply three scaffolded Visible Thinking Routines to a resource of their choice. First, they will use a "See, Think, Wonder" thinking routine to note their observations and interpretations as well as anything about which they are curious. Next, they will analyze the resource using the "Layers" thinking routine. As an optional step, they could also consider the artist or creator of the object's point of view/perspective in creating the resource, with the "Step Inside" thinking routine. Finally, they will create an artwork or representation that depicts a cause that is important to a community of which they are a member.</p> <p>A final item from the American Jewish Historical Society includes information on a student contest running from September 2019 until May 2020, where students create a new poem based on Emma Lazarus' s"New Colossus" on the Statue of Liberty.</p> <p>#visiblethinking</p>
Ashley Naranjo
27
 

Water-Related Hazards: Hurricanes

This topical collection includes resources about water-related hazards and natural disasters, namely hurricanes. Includes examples from around the world and over time, including Hurricane Ike in Texas and the Greater Antilles, Hurricane Katrina in the Gulf Coast, and Hurricane Sandy in the Northeastern region of the United States. Finally, a lesson plan asking students to design a post-hurricane revitalization plan is included.
Ashley Naranjo
11
 

Investigating a Place: Texas, a U.S. State Collection

This state collection utilizes stamps, artworks, photographs, and videos in the Smithsonian's collection to highlight 65 iconic people, places, events and symbols of Texas' history and culture. Students might explore one resource in depth, or conduct a comparison of multiple resources. Follow-up questions might include: What sub-themes can you identify within this collection? What do these resources as a collection tell you about Texas? What marks someone as a "Texan"--is it birthplace alone? What other resources would you want to include to tell a more complete story of Texas history and culture?
Ashley Naranjo
64
 

Aral Sea: Exploring Change Over Time with Satellite Imagery

This teaching collection includes maps and satellite images, complemented by image interpretation guides and related magazine articles, for students to discover what natural causes and human impacts have had consequences for the Aral Sea. The Aral Sea has been a continuously shrinking body of water over the last 50 years after the rivers that fed into it were diverted by irrigation projects. Learn what you can discover by annotating change through satellite imagery.
Ashley Naranjo
17
 

President and Mrs. Obama Portrait Unveiling

<p>On February 12, 2018, the official portraits of President Barack Obama and First Lady Michelle Obama were unveiled at the Smithsonian's National Portrait Gallery. President Obama's portrait was created by artist Kehinde Wiley, who is known for his vibrant, large-scale paintings of African Americans posing as famous figures from the history of Western art. This portrait does not include an underlying art historical reference, but some of the flowers in the background carry special meaning for Obama. Mrs. Obama's portrait was created by artist Amy Sherald, who considers the former first lady to be someone “women can relate to—no matter what shape, size, race, or color. . . . We see our best selves in her.” </p> <p>This collection includes the two portraits, in high resolution, so that learners can zoom in and out to carefully observe details. It also includes videos and articles about the portraits and their official unveilings. Additional supports include other works by the two artists and strategies for reading portraits. Portraits of the two sitters and other presidential portraits can be used for compare and contrast activities. </p>
Ashley Naranjo
36
 

National Art Education Association Webinar: "Constructing Curriculum with the Smithsonian"

<p>This collection was created to complement a National Art Education Association (NAEA) webinar, "<a href="https://virtual.arteducators.org/products/constructing-curriculum-with-the-smithsonian" target="_blank">Constructing Curriculum with the Smithsonian</a>"  (December 11, 2019) featuring resources from the National Museum of African American History and Culture, the National Portrait Gallery and the Smithsonian Learning Lab. </p> <p>The webinar features inquiry-based strategies in examining the American experience depicted through portraiture and unpacking the context of historical narratives communicated through art with students. </p> <p>This collection was created in collaboration with <a href="https://learninglab.si.edu/profile/436" target="_blank">Briana Zavadil White</a> (National Portrait Gallery) and Candra Flanagan (<a href="https://learninglab.si.edu/org/nmaahc" target="_blank">National Museum of African American History and Culture</a>).</p>
Ashley Naranjo
16
 

Smithsonian Video Resources in American Sign Language

This collection includes a growing number of educational video resources in American Sign Language, including the ArtSigns series from the Smithsonian American Art Museum, the story behind an unusual object at the National Museum of American History, the Two Inch Universe from the Chandra X-Ray Observatory, as well as a performance from the National Museum of American Indian, and storytelling at the Smithsonian's Folklife Festival.
Ashley Naranjo
39
 

Ruth Law: Breaking Barriers in Aviation and the War Effort

<p></p> <p>This topical collection of resources and analysis strategies can be used as a brainstorming tool to support student research on the National History Day (#NHD) 2020 theme of  "<a href="https://www.nhd.org/sites/default/files/NHD_2020ThemeBook_web%20version_0.pdf" target="_blank">Breaking Barriers in History</a>". This collection focuses on primary and secondary sources on the accomplishments and contributions of aviator, Ruth Law. </p> <p></p> <p>#BecauseOfHerStory #NHD #NHD2020<br /></p> <p>Tags: Ruth Bancroft Law Oliver, aviator, world records, flight, military, World War I, women's history</p>
Ashley Naranjo
36
 

"An Unnoticed Struggle: A Concise History of Asian American Civil Rights Issues" | Complementary Resources

<p>This topical collection can be used as a complement to the Japanese American Citizens League (JACL) Resource, "An Unnoticed Struggle: A Concise History of Asian American Civil Rights Issues" (<a href="https://jacl.org/wordpress/wp-content/uploads/2015/01/Unnoticed-Struggle.pdf">https://jacl.org/wordpress/wp-content/uploads/2015/01/Unnoticed-Struggle.pdf</a>). Each section of this collection aligns with the historical events, impactful legislation and profiles of individuals outlined within the JACL's resource.</p> <p>This collection can be used to support a deep dive into the featured topics and provides sources that will be helpful in answering compelling and supporting questions, taking into consideration multiple perspectives represented in the sources. </p> <p>#EthnicStudies *This collection was created to support Unit 1: Precious Knowledge--Exploring notions of identity and community, <em>Historical Foundations and Civil Rights </em>of the Austin ISD Ethnic Studies Part A course.</p> <p><em>This Smithsonian Learning Lab collection received Federal support from the Asian Pacific American Initiatives Pool, administered by the Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center. </em><br /></p>
Ashley Naranjo
47
 

Pecha Kucha Talks: Ethnic Studies

<p><em>Pecha Kucha </em>is a storytelling format for sharing information in a fast-paced setting (Japanese for "chit-chat"). In preparation for the City of Austin Parks and Recreation Department's workshop on the <a href="https://learninglab.si.edu/collections/digital-museum-resources-for-the-high-school-ethnic-studies-classroom-city-of-austin-parks-recreation/44WqBJtvMHyVXzFB" target="_blank"><em>Innovative Teaching of Ethnic Studies</em></a><em> </em>(Oct 30, 2019), educators, archivists, and researchers convened to learn more about relevant digital resources available for curriculum creation in Ethnic Studies coursework. </p> <p>The Oct 29, 2019 program included an Asian American community archivist at the Austin History Center; a Social Studies educator at the University of Texas, Austin; a professor and media producer in sharing relevant talks by African American scholars; a Mexican American Studies professional development coordinator; and an archaeologist and historian team combining oral histories with artifacts found in a recent dig. </p> <p>This thematic collection includes digitally-accessible resources that highlight the content shared by these experts. </p> <p>#EthnicStudies</p>
Ashley Naranjo
10