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Ashley Naranjo

Manager of Educator Engagement
Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access, Smithsonian Institution
Smithsonian Staff

In 2011, Ashley Naranjo joined the Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access as a museum educator, specializing in the use of digital museum resources, where she develops and implements professional development opportunities for teachers, librarians and fellow museum educators. Her goal is to bridge museum and formal education settings by using museum digital content to deepen learning. Before coming to the Smithsonian, she has had experiences in education in both formal and informal learning spaces: as an ESOL instructor for adults, a middle school substitute teacher in the humanities and a summer programs administrator at an independent school. She holds a B.A. in Human Development (Developmental Psychology) from the Lynch School of Education at Boston College, where she was a research assistant and independent study student in the Laboratory of Thinking, Learning & Cognition in the Arts. She completed a M.Ed. in Learning Design and Technology from the Rossier School of Education at the University of Southern California, with a thesis entitled, “Using Digital Museum Resources in the Classroom”. She is a recent graduate of the Getty Leadership Institute’s NextGen of Museum Leaders program.

Email: learning@si.edu | Twitter: https://twitter.com/SmithsonianLab

Ashley Naranjo's collections

 

Pecha Kucha Talks: Ethnic Studies

<p><em>Pecha Kucha </em>is a storytelling format for sharing information in a fast-paced setting (Japanese for "chit-chat"). In preparation for the City of Austin Parks and Recreation Department's workshop on the <a href="https://learninglab.si.edu/collections/digital-museum-resources-for-the-high-school-ethnic-studies-classroom-city-of-austin-parks-recreation/44WqBJtvMHyVXzFB" target="_blank"><em>Innovative Teaching of Ethnic Studies</em></a><em> </em>(Oct 30, 2019), educators, archivists, and researchers convened to learn more about relevant digital resources available for curriculum creation in Ethnic Studies coursework. </p> <p>The Oct 29, 2019 program included an Asian American community archivist at the Austin History Center; a Social Studies educator at the University of Texas, Austin; a professor and media producer in sharing relevant talks by African American scholars; a Mexican American Studies professional development coordinator; and an archaeologist and historian team combining oral histories with artifacts found in a recent dig. </p> <p>This thematic collection includes digitally-accessible resources that highlight the content shared by these experts. </p> <p>#EthnicStudies</p>
Ashley Naranjo
10
 

National Art Education Association Webinar: "Constructing Curriculum with the Smithsonian"

<p>This collection was created to complement a National Art Education Association (NAEA) webinar, "<a href="https://virtual.arteducators.org/products/constructing-curriculum-with-the-smithsonian" target="_blank">Constructing Curriculum with the Smithsonian</a>"  (December 11, 2019) featuring resources from the National Museum of African American History and Culture, the National Portrait Gallery and the Smithsonian Learning Lab. </p> <p>The webinar features inquiry-based strategies in examining the American experience depicted through portraiture and unpacking the context of historical narratives communicated through art with students. </p> <p>This collection was created in collaboration with <a href="https://learninglab.si.edu/profile/436" target="_blank">Briana Zavadil White</a> (National Portrait Gallery) and Candra Flanagan (<a href="https://learninglab.si.edu/org/nmaahc" target="_blank">National Museum of African American History and Culture</a>).</p>
Ashley Naranjo
16
 

Analyzing an Oral History Interview: Luis Jimenez

<p>This collection includes an oral history interview clip from the Smithsonian Archives of American Art, with Mexican American artist Luis Jimenez (July 30, 1940-June 13, 2006) from Texas. Students can use the oral history to explore the essential question: <em>What is the purpose and value of oral histories in relation to understanding immigration issues?  </em>A complementary teacher guide from the Blanton Museum of Art (Austin, TX) is available here: <a href="https://blantonmuseum.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/08/Critical-Analysis.pdf" target="_blank">https://blantonmuseum.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/08/Critical-Analysis.pdf</a>.<em> </em>Additional resources to the audio file include: Smithsonian Libraries' graphic organizers for evaluating historical sources, a Smithsonian Folklife and Cultural Heritage guide to conducting an oral history, and additional artworks, photographs, and videos highlighting Jimenez's life.</p> <p>#EthnicStudies *This collection was created to support Unit 2: Culture and Resistance, oral history project assignment of the Austin ISD Ethnic Studies Part B course.<br /></p> <p><em>This Smithsonian Learning Lab collection received Federal support from the Latino and Asian Pacific American Initiatives Pool, administered by the Smithsonian Latino Center and the Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center. </em><br /></p> <p>Keywords: family history, sculptor, close listening, vaquero</p>
Ashley Naranjo
18
 

Music Innovation: How Technology Has Helped to Change Music Over Time

<p>This topical collection provides examples of places, objects and people connecting music and STEM for a teacher professional development workshop hosted by the National Museum of African American History and Culture. During the workshop, teachers explored popular music, the creation of Hip-Hop and the technological advances needed for it to become what it is today. Teachers and students may use this collection as a springboard for the classroom. This collection is not comprehensive, but rather provides a launching point for research and study. #SmithsonianMusic</p>
Ashley Naranjo
67
 

Scientific Instrument Collection: Exploring Acoustics

<p>This collection includes videos demonstrating key principles of the science of sound, using some of the Smithsonian's scientific instrument collection. These videos are paired with the Visible Thinking Routine, "What's going on? What do you see (or hear) that makes you say that?" as a way to check for understanding. Learners can select one or more of the videos to watch and then provide their interpretation of what's happening and support it with a justification from the video. Learners can also explore additional short experiments, under the heading "Additional Resources" to further understand these principles in action.  #SmithsonianMusic</p>
Ashley Naranjo
21
 

How might we re-design our classroom?

<p>This collection begins with the analysis of a series of images from 19th and 20th century classroom settings. Next, learners will apply <em>Agency by Design</em> thinking routines to explore elements of their own classroom that could be re-designed. Learners will go through the design process to: </p> <ul><li>identify the precise challenge</li><li>brainstorm a solution, and</li><li>create a prototype.</li></ul><p>This lesson introduces the design process to learners through a familiar system, the classroom. It allows for learners to collaborate in the improvement and re-design of their own learning environment, while taking into account the needs of other users of the space. </p> <hr /><p><em>This collection was created as an example used in the "Smithsonian Learning Lab, Focus on Design" session at the New Jersey Principals and Supervisors Association (NJPSA) Arts Integration Learning Institute. </em><br /></p>
Ashley Naranjo
21
 

Storytelling through Dance

<p>This collection explores the unique forms of storytelling found in choreography and portraiture. It demonstrates examples of artists that communicate universal narratives and express diverse perspectives without words. Photographs of war veterans by Louie Palu and the veterans’ experiences of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) inspired the featured dance. Students can watch a video interview with the choreographer, Dana Tai Soon Burgess, and answer guided questions from Project Zero's "Claim, Support, Question" thinking routine.</p> <p>This Smithsonian Learning Lab collection received Federal support from the Asian Pacific American Initiatives Pool, administered by the Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center.</p> <p>#APA2018</p> <p>Tags: dance, dancing, choreography, Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD), narrative, interpretation, analysis</p>
Ashley Naranjo
11
 

Scientists, Inventors, and Entrepreneurs: Women Who Shaped History

<p>This topical collection includes resources related to featured women scientists, inventors and entrepreneurs. This collection includes portraits of the scientists, inventors and entrepreneurs, related artifacts, articles, videos with experts, and related Smithsonian Learning Lab collections. Use this collection to launch lessons about the women's life stories, primary source analysis, and examination of the context in which these women lived and made their contributions. This collection is not comprehensive but rather provides a launching point for research and study. <br /></p> <p>Keywords: Mae Carol Jemison, Grace Hopper, Ellena Ocha, Maria Sibylla Merian, Madam CJ Walker, Charlotta Bass, Dr. Nancy Grace Roman, Ursula Marvin, Valentina Tereshokova, #BecauseOfHerStory<br /></p>
Ashley Naranjo
62
 

Activists: Women Who Shaped History

<p>This topical collection includes resources related to featured women activists. This collection includes portraits of the activists, related artifacts, articles, videos with experts, and related Smithsonian Learning Lab collections. Use this collection to launch lessons about the life stories of activists, primary source analysis, and examination of the context in which these women lived and made their contributions. This collection is not comprehensive but rather provides a launching point for research and study. </p> <p>Keywords: Fannie Lou Hamer, Ida B. Wells, Ruth Bader Ginsburg, Edith Windsor, Wilma Mankiller, Grace Lee Boggs, Pauli Murray, Shirley Chisholm, Rachel Carson, Zitkala-Sa, #BecauseOfHerStory</p>
Ashley Naranjo
70
 

Uncovering the Secrets of Queen Kapi’olani’s Canoe

<p>This collection explores the cultural and historical significance of two diplomatic missions by Hawaiian King Kalākaua and Queen Kapi'olani to the United States. These 19th-century diplomatic missions established the first state dinner hosted by U.S. President Grant and included the gifting of a canoe from Queen Kapi'olani to the Smithsonian. Students can watch a video interview about this history and answer guided questions, then look closely  and analyze portraits of the monarchs, read more about the history of U.S. state dinners, and learn about the contemporary collaborations curators have with community members to reveal the history of objects, as described in the film. </p> <p><em>This Smithsonian Learning Lab collection received Federal support from the Asian Pacific American Initiatives Pool, administered by the Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center.</em><br /></p><p>#APA2018<br /></p> <p>Tags: Hawaii, Kapiolani, Kalakaua, outrigger canoe, wa'a, diplomacy</p>
Ashley Naranjo
16
 

Exploring Simple Machines and the Complexities of Rube Goldberg Inventions

<p>This collection explores the concept of Rube Goldberg inventions and their use of multi-step processes to complete an action. Often Rube Goldberg inventions utilize a series of simple machines to cause a chain reaction for a task. Using an image of a comic that features one such invention, students can analyze the parts, purposes and complexities of the object and its processes. Additional resources are included to support the further exploration of these inventions and the identification of the simple machines (levers, pulleys, wedges, screws, wheels, axles and inclined planes). </p> <p>This collection complements an in-person visit to the <em>Rube Goldberg™: The World of Hilarious Invention! Exhibit</em> at the Children's Museum of Pittsburgh.</p> <p>#PZPGH</p>
Ashley Naranjo
15
 

Analyzing Oral History Interviews: Asian Indian Community of Cleveland, Ohio

<p>This collection includes a series of oral history interviews the Asian Indian Community of Cleveland, Ohio from 2013. Ten Asian Indians who settled in the Greater Cleveland region during the 1950s and 1960s were interviewed by middle and high school students. These interviews document their unique immigrant experiences and focus on professional, family and religious life.<br /></p> <p>Complementary resources to the podcast files include: a National Museum of American History teachers' guide and images, Smithsonian Libraries' graphic organizers for evaluating historical sources, and a Smithsonian Folklife and Cultural Heritage guide to conducting your own oral history.</p> <p>Interviewees include: Ajeet Singh Sood, Batuk Modi, Dipti P. Roy, Elizabeth and Winfred Balraj,  Gulab Khandelwal,  Ivan Tewarson, Kul Bhushan, Om Julka, Paramjit Singh, P.K. and Virginia Saha,  Ramachandran Balasubramaniam, Ranajit Datta, Sam Rajiah, Shanta and Surinder Kampani, Shiv and Saroj Aggarwal, Vijay Rastogi, Vinay and Surinder Bhardwaj<br /></p> <p>#APA2018 #EthnicStudies<br /></p> <p><em>This Smithsonian Learning Lab collection received Federal support from the Asian Pacific American Initiatives Pool, administered by the Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center. </em><br /></p>
Ashley Naranjo
10