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Philippa Rappoport

Manager of Community Engagement
Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access
Smithsonian Staff

I work in community engagement, education, and outreach at the Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access (SCLDA), and have a particular interest in creating collections about culture and heritage, as well as collections to support English and other language learning and the Smithsonian-Montgomery College Fellowship program. At SCLDA over the last several years I have focused on creating digital assets for schools, families, and new immigrant English Language learners to complement teacher professional development and pan-Smithsonian programming, including Learning Lab teaching collections, YouTube videos with tradition bearers, a handmade family stories book-making website, and online heritage tours.

Philippa Rappoport's collections

 

Community Engagement and Heritage Best Practices Lecture Series

<p>The videos shown here are from a series, hosted by the Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access and the Smithsonian Heritage Months Steering Committee, that features colleagues from around the country doing innovative work in the fields of community outreach and heritage. Featured here are colleagues from the Tenement Museum in New York City presenting, "Widening the Conversation: Involving Communities in Interpretive Planning," Martha Norkunas presenting "Listening Across Differences," and Faye McMahon and Benjamin Virgilio presenting, "Not Just Child's Play: Emerging Tradition and the Lost Boys of Sudan."</p>
Philippa Rappoport
5
 

Theodore Roszak in the Smithsonian collections

<p>Theodore Roszak (1907-1981) was a Polish American painter and sculptor. He emigrated to the United States as a young child, and won the Logan Medal of Art by age 25. He later moved to New York and taught at Sarah Lawrence College and Columbia University. </p><p>Included in this collection are several works of art and a podcast from the collections of the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, the National Portrait Gallery, and the Smithsonian American Art Museum. You can find other works by searching the collections. </p>
Philippa Rappoport
20
 

6 Jewish American objects for Jewish American Heritage Month

<p>This is a collection of six objects, from the National Museum of American History, that were selected by museum staff for what they reveal about the Jewish American experience.</p><p>I've created this collection from the blog post by Tory Alrman. <em>Tory Altman has also blogged about <a href="http://americanhistory.si.edu/blog/patriotic-anthems">patriotic songs beyond the national anthem</a> and <a href="http://americanhistory.si.edu/blog/new-project-explores-what-it-means-be-american">what it means to be American</a>.</em></p>
Philippa Rappoport
6
 

Asian Pacific American Arts and Crafts: Festival Highlights

<p>This collections comes from an Asian Pacific American Heritage Month family festival at the National Museum of Natural History. Included in the collection are interviews and demonstrations about dance with Dana Tai Soon Burgess, Japanese "kimekomi" doll making with Akiko Keene and Anne Cox, Thai fruit and vegetable carving with Phuangthong Malikul, Rangoli Indian design with Nisha Rajam and Anjana Mohanty, Korean calligraphy by Mookjae, and Chinese paper folding by Alice Li. </p>
Philippa Rappoport
10
 

Asian Pacific American Heritage Month Family Day: Performances, Demonstrations, Interviews

<p>This collection comes from an Asian Pacific American Heritage Month family day at the Kogod Courtyard of the National Portrait Gallery. Included here are music and dance performances by the Chinese Youth Club Lion Dancers, Dhroopad, Mokihana Scalph, Sushmita Mazumdar, MHC's Fil-Am Heritage Dance Ensemble, and an interview with the 2014 Asian Pacific Islander American Spoken Word and Poetry Summit artists.</p>
Philippa Rappoport
6
 

When Irish American eyes are smilin'

<p>This is a collection of objects, from the National Museum of American History, that were selected by museum staff for what they reveal about the Irish American experience.</p><p><em>The manager of Museum Advisory Committees in the museum's Office of External Affairs, Daniel Gifford is a scholar of holidays (see his post on <a href="http://americanhistory.si.edu/blog/inclusion-and-exclusion-two-historic-thanksgiving-cartoons">Thanksgiving cartoons</a>) and the history of vacationing in America. Timothy Winkle is the deputy chair and curator in the Division of Home and Community Life. Eric Jentsch is the deputy chair and curator in the Division of Culture and the Arts. Christy Wallover is a project assistant in the Division of Armed Forces History.</em><br /></p>
Philippa Rappoport
11
 

Digital Museum Resources for the High School Ethnic Studies Classroom (#EthnicStudiesY2)

<p>This collection includes digital museum resources and replicable activities that will serve as a springboard for discussion during the <em>Exploration of Ethnic Studies</em> workshop, held online with the Museum of South Texas History (MOSTHistory) and the University of Texas Rio Grande Valley's (UTRGV) <em>Historias Americanas </em>program on October 23-24, 2020.<em> </em>The collection models how digital museum resources can be leveraged to support critical thinking and deeper learning for high school Ethnic Studies curricula. The collection can be copied and adapted for use in your own classroom. </p> <p>This collection was co-created with <a href="https://learninglab.si.edu/profile/9">Tess Porter</a>.  This program received Federal support from the Latino Initiatives Pool, administered by the Smithsonian Latino Center.</p> <p>#EthnicStudies #HistoriasAmericanas</p><p>Keywords: TEKS</p> <p></p>
Philippa Rappoport
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Inquiry-Based Learning at Its Best Using Digital Museum Resources: A Presentation for NCSS2020 Conference "Advancing Social Justice"

<p>This collection includes digital museum resources and replicable activities that will serve as a springboard for discussion during the NCSS 2020 Online Conference, <strong><em>Advancing Social Justice </em></strong><strong>on December 5, 2020. </strong>The collection models how digital museum resources can be leveraged to support critical thinking and deeper learning, using promising transferable practices developed in a school/museum pilot program on Ethnic Studies.</p> <p>This power session supports educators in accessing and developing instructional materials relevant to middle/junior high grades 6-12 social studies and Ethnic Studies courses. Participants will explore the Smithsonian Learning Lab and find a wide range of multimedia resources from different times and places. They will have an opportunity to sample and consider several applicable Harvard Project Zero visual thinking and global thinking strategies that can help students access and understand primary sources, deepen their critical thinking skills, and learn to trust and articulate their ideas. Participants will leave with enough information to independently use the Smithsonian Learning Lab and implement new classroom ideas.<br><br>Participants will: <br>•       Try out inquiry-based looking strategies using digital museum resources that are suitable for middle and high school social studies and Ethnic Studies courses but applicable across curricula.<br>•    Learn the basics of Smithsonian Learning Lab, a Webby Award-winning platform for users to create and share digital resources with students and a growing national network of educators.<br>•    Explore instructional materials created by educators for Ethnic Studies courses that include digital museum resources and inquiry-based strategies, and are available on the Smithsonian Learning Lab.<br></p> <p>The collection can be copied and adapted for use in your own classroom. </p><p>To browse published Learning Lab content created from the <em>Supporting the Innovative Teaching of High School Level Ethnic Studies Courses in Texas</em> project, see <a href="https://learninglab.si.edu/search/?f%5B_types%5D%5B%5D=ll_collection&st=%23EthnicStudies&s=&page=1">https://learninglab.si.edu/search/?f%5B_types%5D%5B%5D=ll_collection&st=%23EthnicStudies&s=&page=1</a>.  Click on each individual tile to explore its associated collection.<br></p> <p>This collection was co-created with <a href="https://learninglab.si.edu/profile/8" target="_blank">Ashley Naranjo</a>.  This program received Federal support from the Latino and Asian Pacific American Initiatives Pools, administered by the Smithsonian Latino Center and the Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center.</p> <p>#EthnicStudies<br></p> <p></p> <p></p>
Philippa Rappoport
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Learning Lab Training Collection on the Theme: “Humans and the Footprints We Leave: Climate Change and Other Critical Challenges"

<p>This collection is designed to help educators bridge the classroom experience to a museum visit. It is intended to demonstrate various ways to use the Learning Lab and its tools, while offering specific, replicable, pre-engagement activities that can simply be copied to a new collection and used to help students engage with museum resources. </p> <p>Included here: </p> <ul><li>Section 1: a set of flashcards, a template document so that teachers can create and print their own specific sets, and strategies for their use in their classrooms. </li><li>Section 2: a variety of student activities and resources to explore artist Luis Cruz Azaceta's "Shifting States: Iraq," a metaphorical representation of the unrest taking place in Iraq, and more broadly, an exploration of the human condition during times of crisis.  This section includes an image of the work from the Smithsonian American Art Museum, an explanatory video with curator E. Carmen Ramos, two  Thinking Routines - "See, Think, Wonder" and "The 3 Y's" - from Harvard's Project Zero Visible Thinking and Global Thinking materials, and  an array of prompts and Learning Lab tools to help students think critically and globally.  </li><li>Section 3: a short assignment to get participants started using the Learning Lab.</li><li>Section 4: spacer tile template to serve as chapter headings in longer collections.</li></ul><p>This collection is adapted from a teaching collection on the same theme (Luis Cruz Azaceta's "Shifting States: Iraq" ( <a href="http://learninglab.si.edu/q/ll-c/mBWHa8fHUy9vJsE5" style="background-color:rgb(63,63,63);">http://learninglab.si.edu/q/ll...</a>), that includes extension activities. It was created for the 2019 cohort of the Smithsonian-Montgomery College Faculty Fellowship Program on the theme, "The Search for American Identity: Building a Nation Together," and then adapted for the 2020 program on the theme, “Humans and the Footprints We Leave: Climate Change and Other Critical Challenges". </p> <p>Keywords: #MCteach</p> <p><br /></p>
Philippa Rappoport
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Deep Time

<p>This collection serves as a preview for the fourth of six seminar sessions in the 2020 Smithsonian-Montgomery College Faculty Fellowship Program. This year's theme is “Humans and the Footprints We Leave: Climate Change and Other Critical Challenges." </p> <p>Three Smithsonian staff members, Jennifer Collins, Siobhan Starrs, and Scott Wing, will discuss content and educational materials related to the National Museum of Natural History exhibition, <em>Deep Time. </em></p> <p>Resources included in this collection have been recommended by the presenters for participants to explore before the seminar itself.<br></p> <p>#MCteach</p>
Philippa Rappoport
12
 

Looking Past Words: An Exploration of Language, Systems, and Power through Three Case Studies

<p>This teaching collection explores the role of language and power in American and European history through three case studies: the Holocaust, Japanese American incarceration, and Northern Plains treaties. Paired with discussion questions from Project Zero's Global Thinking routines, "Think, Feel, Care" and "The 3 Y's," the collection aims to develop in students a sense of how individuals interact within a particular system, and the significance of these systems and interactions from personal, local, and global contexts.<br></p> <p>#EthnicStudies</p>
Philippa Rappoport
12
 

Toward a More Inclusive America through the Arts: Statues of Liberty and other Reinterpreted National Symbols

<p>This collection asks students to explore the importance of national symbols to our cultural, political, and collective identity. By examining symbols that are meant to reflect our highest ideals as a nation - the Statue of Liberty, the American flag, the Star Spangled Banner, the Battle Hymn of the Republic, and other cultural artifacts - and their many reinterpretations, students will consider difficult questions facing us today: Who is included? Who decides? Why and how do people use national symbols as a way to protest? How have our notions and ideals of liberty changed over time?</p> <p>Included here are </p> <ul><li>images of the artifacts and supporting objects</li><li>three suggested Thinking Routines - "See, Think, Wonder," "Think, Feel, Care," and "The 3 Ys" - from Harvard's Project Zero Artful and Global Thinking materials<br></li><li>supporting interpretive videos, podcasts, and articles</li><li>a discussion/writing prompt</li></ul> <p>For use in Social Studies, Spanish, English, Social Studies, Ethnic Studies, and American History classes<br></p> <p>#EthnicStudies #LatinoHAC </p> <p></p>
Philippa Rappoport
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