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Philippa Rappoport

Manager of Community Engagement
Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access
Smithsonian Staff
Manager of Community Engagement

I work in community engagement, education, and outreach at the Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access (SCLDA), and have a particular interest in creating collections about culture and heritage, as well as collections to support English and other language learning and the Smithsonian-Montgomery College Fellowship program. At SCLDA over the last several years I have focused on creating digital assets for schools, families, and new immigrant English Language learners to complement teacher professional development and pan-Smithsonian programming, including Learning Lab teaching collections, YouTube videos with tradition bearers, a handmade family stories book-making website, and online heritage tours.

Philippa Rappoport's collections

 

"We the People": Flash Card Activity and Template

<p>This collection includes a variety of resources on the theme, "We the People," a template document  for teachers to create their own  flashcard activity with Learning Lab images, and strategies to use them.</p> <p>This collection was created for the 2018 cohort of the Smithsonian-Montgomery College Faculty Fellowship Program on the theme, "We the People: America's Grand and Radical Experiment with Democracy." But anyone can use it.</p> <p>Strategies: Begin by selecting your own set of images. (Feel free to copy this collection and then adapt as you like.) When creating your flashcards, use the template from the last learning tile, and add relevant text diagonally below the object. Print double-sided flipping on the SHORT side.</p> <p>After distributing the cards, have students select one or two that speak to them. Then have them discuss the following questions in groups and share out.</p> <p>Supporting Questions:<br />What themes do you see?<br />Do you see these themes across the objects and over time?</p> <p>Essential Questions:<br />Using these images, define American Democracy.<br />What other resources might you use to tell a fuller story?</p><p><br /></p><p>Keywords: #MCteach</p> <p><br /></p>
Philippa Rappoport
50
 

Using Technology to Explore Our Nation’s Difficult Past

<p>This collection serves as a preview for the fifth of six seminar sessions in the 2018 Smithsonian-Montgomery College Faculty Fellowship Program. This year's theme is “We the People: America’s Grand and Radical Experiment with Democracy.”</p> <p>Kinshasha Holman Conwill, Rex Ellis, Helsynia Brown, Adam Martin, and Jessica Johnson will engage participants in an exploration of the National Museum of African American History and Culture's efforts to use technology to make the museum a participatory environment. A fuller description and presenter bios are included inside the collection.</p> <p>#MCteach</p>
Philippa Rappoport
9
 

The Social Power of Music

<p>This collection serves as a preview for the fourth of six seminar sessions in the 2018 Smithsonian-Montgomery College Faculty Fellowship Program. This year's theme is “We the People: America’s Grand and Radical Experiment with Democracy.” </p> <p>James Deutsch and Atesh Sonneborn of the Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage (CFCH) will explore with Fellows the social relevance of music, and how music conveys meaning in our lives. They will also take Fellows on a guided tour of the CFCH collections.</p> <p>#MCteach</p>
Philippa Rappoport
9
 

Dolores Huerta: Images, Videos, and "One Life" Exhibition

<p>This topical collection explores the contributions to American history and society of Civil Rights activist Dolores Huerta, the "co-architect" with Cesar Chavez of the American Farm Workers Movement. The images and resources can be used as discussion or writing prompts in a variety of courses, including history, culture, language, and literature. Included in this collection are images from the exhibition, "One Life: Dolores Huerta," a bilingual video with National Portrait Gallery curator Taína Caragol, footage of an interview program with Dolores Huerta at the museum, and an NPR interview with Dolores Huerta in January 2017.</p> <p>#LatinoHAC #BecauseOfHerStory<br /></p>
Philippa Rappoport
19
 

Learning Lab Teaching Collection for Frost Art Museum Workshop using Luis Cruz Azaceta's "Shifting States: Iraq"

<p>This teaching collection is designed to be used in the Frost Art Museum's "Exploring Latinx Artists from the Frost Art Museum Collection" workshop on November 6, 2018, to guide participants in a looking activity and to demonstrate the range of tools available in the Learning Lab. </p><p>It is adapted from a teaching collection on the same theme (Luis Cruz Azaceta's "Shifting States: Iraq" <a href="http://learninglab.si.edu/q/ll-c/mBWHa8fHUy9vJsE5">http://learninglab.si.edu/q/ll...</a>) , which aims to help students think critically and globally using two Thinking Routines to explore the painting. The work is a metaphorical representation of the unrest taking place in Iraq, and more broadly, an exploration of the human condition during times of crisis.</p> <p>Included here are an image of the work from the Smithsonian American Art Museum, an explanatory video with curator E. Carmen Ramos, a contextual video featuring the artist himself, three suggested Thinking Routines - "Colors, Shapes, Lines," "The 3 Y's," and "Headlines" - from Harvard's Project Zero Artful Thinking and Global Thinking materials, three other works by Azaceta in the Smithsonian collections, and an array of prompts and Learning Lab tools.</p> <p>For use in Social Studies, Spanish, English, American History, Art History classes</p> <p><em>This program received Federal support from the Latino Initiatives Pool, administered by the Smithsonian Latino Center</em>.<br /></p> <p><br /></p> <p>#LatinoHAC</p>
Philippa Rappoport
15
 

The William Steinway Diary, 1861-1896: A Unique Perspective on post-Civil War New York

<p>This teaching collection asks students to explore William Steinway’s Diary—which includes diary passages, Steinway family photographs, maps, and advertisements that bring alive the fear and chaos of the 1863 Civil War Draft Riots and his hands-on role in the creation of the New York City subway and the company town of Steinway in modern-day Astoria, Queens - as a jumping off point to understand the second half of the 19th century. Included are two Project Zero Thinking Routines and an Analysis Sheet to help students analyse these primary documents. Students can also expand the activity by researching other historical writings (newspapers, journals, city maps, etc.) from the time period, to gain a deeper understanding of this dynamic period in American history. </p><p>The online exhibition describes: "Over 36 years, nine volumes, and more than 2,500 pages, entries record a newlywed’s exuberance, his observations of a country at war, and his emergence as a leader in the cultural, political, financial, and physical development of New York City. In near-daily entries until his death in 1896, William details the period’s financial panics and labor turmoil, rise of the German immigrant class, growing sophistication of transportation, and fierce piano manufacturing wars in which his family firm, Steinway &amp; Sons, was a major player. A proud member of New York’s German American community, William was at once an immigrant success story and an ambitious industrialist whose development of the company town of Steinway left a lasting imprint on modern-day Queens."</p><p><br /><br /></p>
Philippa Rappoport
14
 

Close Looking at Edward Reep's "Italian Shrine," and the Nazi Occupation of Bologna, Italy, during WWII

<p>This teaching collection guides  viewers through a close looking exercise to explore American artist Edward Reep's painting of a shrine in Bologna, Italy, based on photographs and notes from his time as a combat artist in Italy during World War II. The collection is set up for students to look closely at the painting using Harvard's Project Zero Thinking Routine "See, Think, Wonder," and then to consider the historical and political context of the time, as well as the artist's personal experiences in Italy during WWII, in order to better understand Reep's homage in painting to the thousands of Italian Resistance fighters and citizens who lost their lives fighting against the Nazi occupation during World War II. The activity concludes with another Project Zero Routine from the Global Thinking series, "The 3 Y's."</p> <p><br /></p>
Philippa Rappoport
5
 

Using Global Thinking Strategies with Latino Content

<p>Teachers looking to foster in their students a broader understanding and appreciation of today’s complex world can use these Learning Lab collections that pair Harvard’s Project Zero Global Thinking Routines with new bilingual Latino-content videos of National Portrait Gallery and Smithsonian American Art Museum curators discussing works in the collection. <br /></p> <p>Each Learning Lab teaching collection includes additional supporting materials to add dimension, expand the activity, and deepen students' learning. <br /></p> <p>These four videos were created with federal support from the Latino Initiatives Pool, administered by the Smithsonian Latino Center.<br /></p><p>#LatinoHAC<br /></p>
Philippa Rappoport
5
 

Engaging Families through Art and Technology Programs: "Discovering US/Descubriéndonos"

<p>This collection contains assets and resources designed to help teachers (art, English, social studies, and media technology), museum educators, and community-based informal learning educators recreate our very successful Discovering Us/<em>Descubriéndonos</em> program as is, or design their own, based on the specific needs of their classroom or learning community.  </p> <p>Discovering Us/<em>Descubriéndonos</em> was a Spanish-language workshop for students and families in the Fairfax County Public School's Family and School Partnerships <em>Luther Jackson Middle School Parent Leadership Program</em>. Pairs of immigrant mothers and their middle school-aged children worked together to create portraits and multimedia production pieces that communicate their family history and their future hopes and dreams.</p> <p>Included here are examples of student work (videos and portraits), and classroom images of the creative process. The videos were created in iMovie, but there are a variety of other free movie-making apps available. <br /></p> <p>#LatinoHAC<br /></p>
Philippa Rappoport
24
 

Origami Cranes: Activity and Background Information

<p>People from all over the world have enjoyed doing traditional paper crafts for hundreds and sometimes thousands of years. In this set, you'll explore the tradition of the origami Japanese paper crane, a symbol of hope. A demonstration video is included for those who want to make their own crane. Appropriate for classroom, home, or informal education settings.</p> <p>The Japanese word "origami" comes from two smaller words: "ori" which means "to fold," and "kami" meaning "paper." Although this is the most common word in the United States for the craft of paper folding, the tradition is known to have existed in China and Japan for more than a millennium, and from there it spread to other countries around the world. Japanese patterns tend to focus on animals and flowers, while Chinese designs are usually for things like boats and hats. Paper folding's earlier use was ceremonial, but with time the tradition became popular as a children's activity. <br /></p>
Philippa Rappoport
8
 

The Art of Gaman: Storytelling, Musical and Dance Performance, and Hands-On Activities Demonstrations

<p>This collections comes from an Asian Pacific American Heritage Month family day in the Grand Salon of the Renwick Gallery of Art. The festival was created to complement the Renwick exhibition, "The Art of Gaman: Arts and Crafts from the Japanese American Internment Camps, 1942-1946." Included here are an interview with the curator of the exhibition, as well as musical and dance performances by Nen Daiko and the Kikuyuki Dancers of America, storytelling and an interview with Anne Shimojima, and hands-on origami and doll-making demonstrations.</p>
Philippa Rappoport
10
 

Origami Animals: Demonstration Videos and Background Information

<p>People from all over the world have enjoyed doing traditional paper crafts for hundreds and sometimes thousands of years. In this set, you'll find interviews with origami artists and a variety of demonstration videos to make paper animals (bull, butterfly, crane) and a paper wallet. Appropriate for classroom, home, or informal education settings.</p> <p>The Japanese word "origami" comes from two smaller words: "ori" which means "to fold," and "kami" meaning "paper." Although this is the most common word in the United States for the craft of paper folding, the tradition is known to have existed in China and Japan for more than a millennium, and from there it spread to other countries around the world. Japanese patterns tend to focus on animals and flowers, while Chinese designs are usually for things like boats and hats. Paper folding's earlier use was ceremonial, but with time the tradition became popular as a children's activity.<br /></p> <p>Grab some paper and have fun!<br /></p> <p><br /></p>
Philippa Rappoport
5