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Philippa Rappoport

Manager of Community Engagement
Smithsonian Office of Educational Technology
Smithsonian Staff

I work in community engagement, education, and outreach at the Smithsonian Office of Educational Technology (OET), and have a particular interest in creating collections about culture and heritage, as well as collections to support English and other language learning and the Smithsonian-Montgomery College Fellowship program. At OET over the last several years I have focused on creating digital assets for schools, families, and new immigrant English Language learners to complement teacher professional development and pan-Smithsonian programming, including Learning Lab teaching collections, YouTube videos with tradition bearers, a handmade family stories book-making website, and online heritage tours.

Philippa Rappoport's collections

 

Social Justice in the Time of Pandemic: Smithsonian-Montgomery College Faculty Fellowship 2022 Opening Panel Resources

<p>This collection serves as an introduction to the opening panel of the 2022 Smithsonian-Montgomery College Faculty Fellowship Program. This year's theme is “Social Justice in the time of Pandemic: The Hurdles Behind, the Urgency of Now, and Moving Forward after Covid." Five Smithsonian staff members will present at the session to explore the various ways that the Smithsonian is addressing issues of social justice in the time of pandemic. Presenters include Ashleigh Coren (Smithsonian American Women's History Initiative and National Portrait Gallery), Ariana Curtis (Our Shared Future: Reckoning with Our Racial Past Initiative and National Museum of African American History and Culture), Healoha Johnston (Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center), Andrea Jones (Anacostia Community Museum), and Ranald Woodaman (National Museum of the American Latino). Their bios, presentation descriptions, and other resources are included inside. (Click on each tile for more information.)<br><br>As you explore these resources, jot down any questions you have for the presenters. It is sure to be a fascinating and thought-provoking seminar series!<br><br>#MCteach</p>
Philippa Rappoport
22
 

English and Scottish Ballads from Smithsonian Folkways

<p>Here is a collection of English and Scottish ballads, recorded by Smithsonian Folkways and sung by Ewan MacColl, who is sometimes referred to as the "godfather of British folk revival." These recordings are in the Folkways Records Collection, 1948-1986.</p>
Philippa Rappoport
10
 

German Foods in America

<p>This topical collection includes images and articles about German food in America, and considers more broadly the effects of immigration on foodways traditions. Included are images, a website from the National Museum of American History that looks at historical context, articles on specific foods, and a link to a treasure trove of recipes. Enjoy!</p>
Philippa Rappoport
11
 

Michael Cumming's "Haitian Mermaid #2"

<h4><br></h4> <p>This collection prompts students to explore "Haitian Mermaid #2," an artwork by Michael Cummings using the Project Zero Thinking Routine "See, Think, Wonder." After careful observation, students consider two additional images of the mermaid Lasirn by unknown artists, using the Project Zero Artful Thinking Routine "See, Wonder, Compare." The collection can be used to practice and strengthen students' comfort looking at objects and making observations. </p> <p>Also included is an article from the National Museum of National History that includes some background on the mermaid Lasirn in Haiti. According to the article, "the mermaid Lasirn is one of three powerful female water spirits, sometimes considered sisters, who are honored in shrines. One sister is cool, calm and seductive. The other is hot, passionate, angry, and strong. Lasirn's personality is a blend of these opposites. Together, they validate a wide range of temperaments for women." In addition, as in many pictures of Lasirn, a Vodou banner in the exhibition shows her with a mirror and comb, as well as another common mermaid symbol, a trumpet. Lasirn wears modern, imported clothing, such as the cowboy hat... Flags or banners with pictures of spirits are an important part of Vodou ceremonies in Haiti. They are hung in temples or carried in processions to salute the spirits. A single banner may have more than 10,000 sequins."</p> <p>Keywords: Caribbean</p>
Philippa Rappoport
6
 

Using Technology to Explore Our Nation’s Difficult Past

<p>This collection serves as a preview for the fifth of six seminar sessions in the 2018 Smithsonian-Montgomery College Faculty Fellowship Program. This year's theme is “We the People: America’s Grand and Radical Experiment with Democracy.”</p> <p>Kinshasha Holman Conwill, Rex Ellis, Helsynia Brown, Adam Martin, and Jessica Johnson will engage participants in an exploration of the National Museum of African American History and Culture's efforts to use technology to make the museum a participatory environment. A fuller description and presenter bios are included inside the collection.</p> <p>#MCteach</p>
Philippa Rappoport
9
 

1619 Project: Support collection of resources from the National Museum of African American History and Culture

<p>Here are some resources suggested by colleagues at the National Museum of African American History and Culture, in support of a professional development workshop with the University of Arizona's Center for the Study of Race and Democracy and The 1619 Project Advocates of Arizona.</p>
Philippa Rappoport
6
 

Origami Animals: Demonstration Videos and Background Information

<p>People from all over the world have enjoyed doing traditional paper crafts for hundreds and sometimes thousands of years. In this set, you'll find interviews with origami artists and a variety of demonstration videos to make paper animals (bull, butterfly, crane) and a paper wallet. Appropriate for classroom, home, or informal education settings.</p> <p>The Japanese word "origami" comes from two smaller words: "ori" which means "to fold," and "kami" meaning "paper." Although this is the most common word in the United States for the craft of paper folding, the tradition is known to have existed in China and Japan for more than a millennium, and from there it spread to other countries around the world. Japanese patterns tend to focus on animals and flowers, while Chinese designs are usually for things like boats and hats. Paper folding's earlier use was ceremonial, but with time the tradition became popular as a children's activity.<br /></p> <p>Grab some paper and have fun!<br /></p> <p><br /></p>
Philippa Rappoport
5
 

The Art of Gaman: Storytelling, Musical and Dance Performance, and Hands-On Activities Demonstrations

<p>This collection comes from an Asian Pacific American Heritage Month family day in the Grand Salon of the Renwick Gallery of Art. The festival was created to complement the Renwick exhibition, "The Art of Gaman: Arts and Crafts from the Japanese American Internment Camps, 1942-1946." Included here are an interview with the curator of the exhibition, as well as musical and dance performances by Nen Daiko and the Kikuyuki Dancers of America, storytelling and an interview with Anne Shimojima, and hands-on origami and doll-making demonstrations.</p>
Philippa Rappoport
10
 

Metadata and Tagging Activity

<p>This activity, designed as a group exercise, asks participants to assume the role of a college student researching American women's work in the early 20th century, as an entry point to consider what is useful when tagging, searching, and creating digital resources. The collection includes the images that participants considered, followed in each case by a PDF of their responses. For the activity instructions, see the second tile of the collection.</p> <p>This activity was conducted at the inaugural meeting of the Smithsonian Digital Resources Steering Committee, a group convened to share knowledge and explore best practices, issues, and strategies that arise in using and creating digital cultural museum resources.  </p> <p>Kayo Denda, Librarian for Women's, Gender and Sexuality Studies at Rutgers University and Visiting Fellow at the Smithsonian Office of Educational Technology, created the activity reproduced here.  As a Fellow, Ms. Denda is exploring how libraries, museums, and archives develop metadata for content on women in American history.  <br></p> <p>#DCRSC</p> <p><br></p> <p><br></p>
Philippa Rappoport
17
 

6 Jewish American objects for Jewish American Heritage Month

<p>This is a collection of six objects, from the National Museum of American History, that were selected by museum staff for what they reveal about the Jewish American experience.</p><p>I've created this collection from the blog post by Tory Alrman. <em>Tory Altman has also blogged about <a href="http://americanhistory.si.edu/blog/patriotic-anthems">patriotic songs beyond the national anthem</a> and <a href="http://americanhistory.si.edu/blog/new-project-explores-what-it-means-be-american">what it means to be American</a>.</em></p>
Philippa Rappoport
6
 

When Irish American eyes are smilin'

<p>This is a collection of objects, from the National Museum of American History, that were selected by museum staff for what they reveal about the Irish American experience.</p><p><em>The manager of Museum Advisory Committees in the museum's Office of External Affairs, Daniel Gifford is a scholar of holidays (see his post on <a href="http://americanhistory.si.edu/blog/inclusion-and-exclusion-two-historic-thanksgiving-cartoons">Thanksgiving cartoons</a>) and the history of vacationing in America. Timothy Winkle is the deputy chair and curator in the Division of Home and Community Life. Eric Jentsch is the deputy chair and curator in the Division of Culture and the Arts. Christy Wallover is a project assistant in the Division of Armed Forces History.</em><br /></p>
Philippa Rappoport
11
 

Asian Pacific American Heritage Month Resources

<p>These classroom resources from different Smithsonian museums focus on Asian Pacific American history and culture. </p>
Philippa Rappoport
25