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Found 7,235 Resources

Teacher

National Museum of American History

Teacher's Token

National Museum of American History

Untitled (Teacher)

Smithsonian American Art Museum

The Teacher

Smithsonian American Art Museum

Teacher's Pet

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
Children's wallpaper showing a variety of animals including a zebra, sheep, pig, duck, fish, skunk, mouse, yak and a flamingo arranged across the width of the paper. With exception of the zebra each is brightly colored in unnatural hues. The name of each animal is printed above the figure. Printed on a white ground.

Teacher Benares

Smithsonian American Art Museum

Software, Teacher and Teacher Data Transfer

National Museum of American History

Software, Teacher and Teacher Data Transfer

National Museum of American History

Teacher’s Number Line

National Museum of American History
From the time of Descartes (1596–1650), mathematicians have described positive and negative integers as evenly spaced points on a line, now called the number line, that extends infinitely in both directions. This usage had made it into some school textbooks by the early 20th century. Particularly at the time of the development of the New Math in the 1950s and 1960s, number lines became part of the school classroom. This example of a number line was developed by Loraine McMillan and sold by Houghton Mifflin Company to accompany the 1972 edition of the textbook Modern School Mathematics. McMillan also prepared a leaflet describing how the number line should be used and a that sold separately. The device consists of eleven cards. Ten of these can be placed end to end to show a number line with the integers from 0 to 100 written in red. The eleventh card is divided into segments but has no numbers marked on it. Each card, unfolded, measures 89 cm. w. x 11 cm. d. The cards were coated with clear plastic so that teachers could mark them with crayons or felt tip markers. The teacher’s guide is printed on blue paper. A mark on it reads: Teacher’s number line; teacher’s guide(/) by (/) Loraine McMillan. Another mark on it reads: houghton (/) mifflin (/) company. A third mark reads: 1972 . This example appears unused. It was received in 2012, and had been the property of Harvard University mathematician Andrew Gleason. References: P. A. Kidwell, A. Ackerberg-Hastings, and D. L. Roberts, Tools of American Mathematics Teaching, Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press (2008), pp. 202-203. Max Beberman and Bruce Meserve, “The Concept of a Literal Number Symbol,” Mathematics Teacher; 48, 1955, pp. 198–202.

Teacher Tips: Weather

Smithsonian Science Education Center
Karen Pavlik provides some practical tips for successfully teaching a weather unit at the elementary level.

Ellen, The Teacher

National Museum of American History
Mrs. (Barbara) Hofland’s Ellen, The Teacher, a Tale for Youth was published by W. B. Gilley of New York in 1815. The novel tells the tale of Ellen, who as a young girl expressed a desire to be a teacher. Growing up, her mother dies, and her father becomes bankrupt. Her fortunes continue to decline until she is rescued by a kindly older gentleman who sends her to school and helps her become a teacher. Ellen then forms her own school for children who were neglected as she was. The Copp Collection contains about 150 books of early American imprint and shows a wide range of reading matter typical of a New England Puritan family living in a port town. Literacy was expected of many New Englanders, as Puritan doctrine required everyone to read the Bible. The abundance of multiple Bibles, psalms, hymnodies, sermons, and morality tales reflects the Copp’s religious beliefs. Other highlights of the library include the works of Shakespeare, almanacs, historical and political texts, and travel narratives. The Copp Collection contains a variety of household objects that the Copp family of Connecticut used from around 1700 until the mid-1800s. Part of the Puritan Great Migration from England to Boston, the family eventually made their home in New London County, Connecticut, where their textiles, clothes, utensils, ceramics, books, bibles, and letters provide a vivid picture of daily life. More of the collection from the Division of Home and Community Life can be viewed by searching accession number 28810.

Flower to Teacher

Smithsonian American Art Museum

Teacher and Children

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
A woman and a group of children holding hands, forming a ring. Swings in the background.

Teacher and Children

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
A woman and a group of small children holding hands, forming a ring. Children on swings, and skipping rope, in the background.

Shiva as Teacher

Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery

Anthropology Teacher Resources

SI Center for Learning and Digital Access
A list of free teacher resources put out by the NMNH Department of Anthropology. Includes issues of Anthronotes (publication for educators), leaflets, bibliographies, and teacher packets on a variety of topics within anthropology.

Teacher Equipment Catalogs

National Museum of American History

Rest Hour (Columbia Teacher's College)

Smithsonian American Art Museum

Teacher's Anatomical Aid

National Museum of American History

Teacher Needs School Supplies

National Museum of American History
This homemade poster was used by public-school third-grade teacher Teresa Danks in July 2017 in a roadside effort in Tulsa, Oklahoma, to raise funds for her classroom. Most public-school teachers use their own money or raise funds to provide classroom supplies. Danks was spurred to action by her frustration with recent steep cuts to Oklahoma’s education budget. Her effort attracted media attention nationwide and helped to bring awareness to the issue of teachers’ role in providing classroom supplies.

Articles reporting on Danks’s effort include:

https://time.com/4871149/oklahoma-teresa-danks-panhandling-school-supplies/

https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/education/wp/2017/07/24/a-teachers-solution-to-buy-school-supplies-for-her-classroom-panhandling/

Portrait of a Teacher

Smithsonian American Art Museum

Killer Joe, Dance Teacher

National Museum of American History

Teacher Lesson: Compare & Contrast

National Portrait Gallery
Briana Zavadil White, school and teacher program coordinator at the National Portrait Gallery, demonstrates the Compare and Contrast strategy for exploring portraiture. The Compare and Contrast looking strategy allows students to discover the similarities and differences between two portraits of the same individual. When looking closely at these two portraits of Pocahontas, students can determine which of these portraits was created from life, and which one is based from the other. The Compare and Contrast strategy also works well when comparing the likeness of an individual over time, and considering what has occurred during the years of the portraits.
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