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Found 33 Collections

 

Project Zero Thinking Routines

This introductory collection includes the Understanding Map and several of Harvard University’s Project Zero routines. Workshop participants will select a routine(s) based on the type of thinking and understanding they are trying to encourage. The routine(s) can be paired with museum resource(s) (visuals, audio, texts) that (1) align to a topic or theme that will be taught this semester and (2) provide engaging stimuli to prompt discussion. 

#PZPGH #LatinoHAC #APA2018 #TWUtech #WISSIT #EthnicStudies

Ashley Naranjo
48
 

Comparing & Contrasting

This collection is a great way for students to practice comparing and contrasting objects. 

I begin by having students complete a See, Wonder with the first image of the Odyssey Video Game. I then show them the second image of the GameBoy. They complete a See, Wonder for that image, then complete the Connect portion by comparing and contrasting both images.

#PZPGH

C.Harris
4
 

Character & Setting

This collection focuses on exploring characters and settings, as well as how the two can be used together for a specific purpose. I used this collection to demonstrate to students how characters and settings impact one another.

#PZPGH

C.Harris
6
 

Behind Design: Exploring Culture Through Artifact Investigation

Introduction

How might we learn about cultures through the study of artifacts? What role could the study of design elements and process play in in deepening our understanding? How could we leverage student agency of the design process to gain opportunities to recognize relationships between artifacts and culture?

This collection provides opportunities for students to uncover complexity by looking closely and making connections between cultures and the design process behind the artifacts. Student claims are based on evidence using provided resources for investigation. The Artifact Investigation Map serves as a visible thinking tool for documenting our understanding of a culture by making connections between the artifact and research.

Procedure

Begin by looking closely at an artifact, Lone Dog Winter Count, using a Project Zero Routine, Zoom In. Through close examination, we begin to develop hypotheses about the object and the connections to the culture. While a main goal is to learn more about the culture related to the artifact, we are also building a capacity for using this thinking process to build understanding. Record and display class ideas generated through this routine. In the discussion of culture, we are looking at how people live: What do the people value? What are their priorities and motivations?

Introduce the points of The Artifact Investigation Map. Ask students, “How could this be used to organize the ideas documented from the thinking routine about the artifact and the people who created it?”. (Students may recognize this as the Engineering Design Process.) Building on our initial Zoom In documentation, the group connects the artifact ideas to the map points. Different questions within each point may serve as prompts to continue making connections and lead to more questions about what we still wonder, guiding the next research steps. Provide a space to record and share new questions during the process.

Begin the research process with the first video Lakota Winter Counts. Using information from the source, model the process of organizing the findings using the different points on The Artifact Investigation Map. Be sure to highlight unanswered questions in the map as the class decides the future steps in the research. Support the student use of resource-based evidence starting from this Learning Lab collection when making and documenting claims. Depending on the learners, this phase may vary in the structure of guidance and interaction. Documentation is shared with an emphasis on providing opportunities to discuss the claims, findings, and analysis.


Guiding Points for Inquiry using The Artifact Investigation Map:

Ask: What needs or problems might this artifact address/solve? Does this design reflect empathy for a particular group or person?

Imagine: What possible prototypes or variations might have been produced in the timeline of this artifact? Could there have been earlier versions leading to this one?  

Plan: Identify and describe what could have been key factors and/or restrictions influencing design process. Examples: materials/natural resources, traditions, people power, skills, technology/tools, historical and natural environment….

(Re)Create: Describe the possible steps taken to create the artifact. What could this look like? Options include for this exploration: Try to create a version or reenact one of the steps of the process. Use observations of the process to draw possible conclusions about the culture. Sketch or act out the steps. Take a part of the process and use the Step Inside thinking routine. *Document and share this process with the group in order to prepare for the next phase of The Artifact Investigation Map

Improvements: Since the creation of this artifact, what versions do we see today? What would the biography of this type of innovation look like? How might this type of artifact connect to modern innovation?  *Extension for Improvements: Use the thinking routine Imagine If to evaluate a modern iteration of the artifact. How does it compare to the original?


Documenting Ongoing Conclusions/Questions/Reflections

Throughout the investigation, students share and post supported claims about the culture and reflect upon the process of using the design cycle to guide the study.

For the final reflection, use the thinking routine I Used to Think, Now I Think… to look for changes in thinking. Keep the process and research lines of thinking open for continued exploration with the unanswered questions.

#PZPGH

Erik Lindemann
30
 

Behind Design: Exploring American Indian Cultures Through Artifact Investigation

Introduction

How might we learn about cultures through the study of artifacts? What role could the study of design elements and process play in in deepening our understanding? How could we leverage student agency of the design process to gain opportunities to recognize relationships between artifacts and culture.

This collection provides opportunities for students to uncover complexity by looking closely and making connections between cultures and the design process behind the artifacts. Student claims are based on evidence using provided resources for investigation. The Artifact Investigation Map serves as a visible thinking tool for documenting our understanding of a culture by making connections between the artifact and our research.

Procedure

Begin by looking closely at an artifact, Lone Dog Winter Count, using a Project Zero Routine, See, Think, Wonder. Through close examination, we begin to develop hypotheses about the object and the connections to the culture. While a main goal is to learn more about the culture related to the artifact, we are also building a capacity for using this thinking process to build understanding. Record and display class ideas generated through this routine. In the discussion of culture, we are looking at how people live: What do the people value? What are their priorities and motivations?

Introduce the points of The Artifact Investigation Map. Ask students, “How could this be used to organize the ideas documented from the thinking routine about the artifact and the people who created it?”. (Students may recognize this as the Engineering Design Process.) Building on our initial See, Think, Wonder documentation, the group connects the artifact ideas to the map points. Different questions within each point may serve as prompts to continue making connections and lead to more questions about what we still wonder, guiding the next research steps. Provide a space to record and share new questions during the process.

Begin the research process with the first video Lakota Winter Counts. Using information from the source, model the process of organizing the findings using the different points on The Artifact Investigation Map. Be sure to highlight unanswered questions in the map as the class decides the future steps in the research. Support the student use of resource-based evidence starting from this Learning Lab collection when making and documenting claims. Depending on the learners, this phase may vary in the structure of guidance and interaction. Documentation is shared with an emphasis on providing opportunities to discuss the claims, findings, and analysis.


Guiding Points for Inquiry using The Artifact Investigation Map:

Ask: What needs or problems might this artifact address/solve? Does this design reflect empathy for a particular group or person?

Imagine: What possible prototypes or variations might have been produced in the timeline of this artifact? Could there have been earlier versions leading to this one?  

Plan: Identify and describe what could have been key factors influencing design process. Examples: materials/natural resources, people power, skills, technology/tools, historical and natural environment….

(Re)Create: Describe the possible steps taken to create the artifact. What could this look like? Options include for this exploration: Try to create a mini-version or reenact one of the steps of the process. Use observations of the process to draw possible conclusions about the culture. Sketch or act out the steps. Take a part of the process and use the Step Inside thinking routine. *Document and share this process with the group in order to prepare for the next phase of The Artifact Investigation Map

Improvements: Since the creation of this artifact, what versions do we see today? What would the biography of this type of innovation look like? How might this type of artifact connect to modern innovation? *Extension for Improvements: Use the thinking routine Imagine If to evaluate a modern iteration of the artifact. How does it compare to the original?


Documenting Ongoing Conclusions/Questions/Reflections

Throughout the investigation, students share and post supported claims about the culture and reflect upon the process of using the design cycle to guide the study.

For the final reflection, use the thinking routine I Used to Think, Now I Think… to look for changes in thinking. Keep the process and research lines of thinking open for continued exploration with the unanswered questions.

#PZPGH

Andrea Croft
31
 

Harlem Renaissance Art and Music

This collection was developed for a unit based upon the Harlem Renaissance and the art movement incorporating the style of visual artist Romare Bearden for students PreK thru 6th grade.  Students were exposed to different musical artists such as Cab Calloway, Louis Armstrong, and Duke Ellington to make the connections between Bearden's art work and their musical abilities.  This group of artifacts was beneficial for students to be exposed to people, art work, and history that they may not have been exposed to before.  Using the thinking routines such as 'See, Think, Wonder' was a great way for students to dive deeper into images, not just art work but even images of people and the differences in time periods.

#pzpgh

Rebecca Grubbs
15
 

How Much Can I Fit in My Cracker Box? What Came First the Cracker or the Box? PZPgh

The students will explore the idea of volume.  They will think about how a cracker box was constructed and how it could be filled.  The students will then apply what they have learned to create a lunchbox.  See the following collection to continue.   Learning  Volume Through Lunchbox Architecture PZPgh

Al Dietrich
9
 

Living Things: Parts and Purposes

This collection reinforces the question:

How do the parts of plants and animals help them to grow and survive? 

Students will look for patterns as they observe various plant and animal artifacts to determine the necessary parts for living organisms.

The visible thinking routine of "parts, purposes and complexities" will be at the center of this collection as we analyze the needs of plants and animals and how their parts satisfy those needs.  While we took a deep dive into just a couple of the living things, I've included a few other artifacts for educator choice.  

This collection also utilizes the See, Think, Wonder routine to help pique student interest, build student engagement and introduce the concept of parts and purposes of living things.  

*I paired this lesson with a real world observation of a plant to observe, examine and describe the function of plant parts.


#PZPGH

Katie Richter
10
 

Explorers and Exploring

Various explorers (mainly early Americas) and ideas supporting exploration. Project Zero thinking routines paired with resources. #pzpgh

Thomas Anderson
18
 

The Three Branches of Government

This Collection contains resources to help students understand the three branches of government in the United States.

SWBT identify and describe the purposes of each branch of the United States government. 

#PZPGH


Jackie Pack
18
 

Planets of the Solar System

Through this collection, students will deepen their understanding of each planet in our solar system.  Pairing the See, Think, Wonder thinking routine with an embroidered quilt of the solar system will peak students' interest in the dwarf planet, Pluto.  After discovering the year that the quilt was made, students can explore the website to learn the history of Pluto.

Using the provided websites, students will work in groups to research a planet.  They will use the obtained information to write a headline that captures the most interesting aspect of the planet and to create a model of the planet.

#PZPGH

Jamie Bonacorso
21
 

Revolutionary War

This collection was created for the purpose of immersing my fifth grade social studies students in a world of artifacts that they would otherwise not have had the opportunity to see. My students lack exposure and background knowledge centered around the arts. Most of them would never have the opportunity to view these artifacts in person. Having this collection and abundance of  options to integrate into my curriculum opens a world of opportunities! #pzpgh

Jamie Chambers
29
 

Three Branches of U.S. Government

This collection was designed to be used in a third grade classroom to supplement the teaching of the three branches of U.S. government.  The collection would be utilized over the course of a week-long unit.

Objective: Students will be able to identify and explain the purpose of the three branches of the U.S. government.

#PZPGH

Monique Wertz
23
 

Educating for Global Competence: A Professional Development Workshop

This is a lesson designed for a teacher workshop on using Thinking Routines to spark curiosity and a desire to explore topics in depth. The estimated length of the workshop is 45 minutes, although there are extensions to the learning that could easily double that time (see below).

The first step is to engage in slow looking with the image. I will project it on a screen and we will get close in order to see all of the details. It's a dense image, with copious detail. I'll ask the teachers to look closely, noting where their eyes go, what they focus on.

Once we have had time to scan the image a few times, I'll introduce the See-Wonder-Connect Thinking Routine. See the next resource for the sequencing of questions. For the connect in this instance, I'll ask: How does this painting's subject matter connect to topics you teach, or that are taught in your school?

After completing the Thinking Routine, I'll reveal the title, Manifest Destiny, and ask for reactions to it. Why would Rockman choose that title? What do you think the artist is trying to say?

I'll give some background information about the artist and the painting. There are resources posted that give further information.

The teachers will go back to small groups at tables and brainstorm further how the image (or perhaps another image) could be used in their own context.

The lesson can be extended in a variety of ways. It can be a kick-off to an interdisciplinary study of various issues raised by the small groups, for example. I've used the 3Ys Global Thinking Routine to evaluate the significance of the various issues. Following the 3Ys, I then ask: How can you go more deeply with this topic? What more do you need to learn?

This image is a strong example of an artist's response to contemporary issues. One can't understand the potential impact of global warming without knowledge of science. In that way, it offers great potential for interdisciplinary exploration. But it could also connect to dystopian views in art (literature, visual art, etc.); artistic responses to the contemporary world; the ephemerality of human creations; etc.

#PZPGH

James Reese
10
 

Compare and Contrast: Schools Then and Now

In this collection, students will be able to make a connection to schools in years past by comparing and contrasting their modern day school environment to schools long ago. The See, Think, Wonder routine allows for children to recognize differences and similarities through using historical resources and events. This collection can be used as a cross curricular resource to create lessons for several units including segregation, civil rights, and time lines. #PZPGH

Cynthia Murphy
12
 

Comparing and Contrasting Across Similar Texts-Fairy Tales

In this collection, students will be able to explore the skill of comparing and contrasting across similar texts with a focus on fairy tales using the See, Think, Wonder thinking routine. This collection would be used best after first reading several different fairy tales with students.

#PZPGH


Sara Greco
7
 

Nonrenewable Resource: Coal Mining

This collection can be used to introduce a unit about natural resources and the Industrial Revolution.  Students will have a chance to reflect upon where natural resources come from, the danger of extracting the natural resources, and living conditions of some workers that mined this nonrenewable resources in the past.   #PZPGH

Gretchen Hogue
15
 

Math Talks

I am using these photos/paintings paired with the "Claim, Support, Question" thinking routine as a springboard to have deeper class and group discussions about difficult math problems. 

#PZPGH

Amy Taylor
23
 

Using Close Investigation of Artworks to Tell Stories and Take Perspectives

This collection provides opportunities for students to uncover the deeper meaning of and build an understanding behind an artist’s work, reveal an artist’s personal values, as well as begin developing empathy and sparking curiosity through close observation, perspective-taking and questioning. This deeper look into artwork can be used as a catalyst for students to share their own works, and act as an agent for action in their larger community.

#PZPGH

Andrea Croft
28
 

Patents and Design ideas

*This is a smaller portion of the process of creating an invention.*


Goal:  Students will see the importance in how patents and designs are drawn and created before they begin to make their own.  

Introduction:  Students are shown a picture of a sewing machine, but in the patent form.  Have them try to guess what it is.  Discuss why detailed drawings are important and how it helps in creating a design for an idea.  

Students use the see, think, wonder routine to work with other photos of patents and designs and figure out what they are.  Let the students guide the discussion with their ideas and explanations.  They can try to back up their opinions with information to explain what they think they are seeing in the pictures.  Students will then watch a short film clip to see how inventors got inspired.  Then discuss ways they might get inspired and talk about what they do in every day life that they could improve upon.  I use this example because it is the easiest for them to wrap their heads around in the beginning.  

Wrap up with an "I use to think, but now I think" discussion about how important designs are and being detailed can make a difference in a drawing.  

This could take one or two class periods as a short introduction before jumping into a designing project.  I've also included the SparkLab's Inventors Notebook as an example of how to walk students through the design/creating process.  


#PZPGH


Nicole Wilkinson
10
 

Maps as Primary Resources

Introduction:  How can we use primary sources to learn more about the world around us and how it changes over time.  By applying Project Zero routines, student groups explore maps over time and discuss why/how they change.    

Procedure:

Provide the students with a piece of the Waldsemuller map and have them use the Parts, Purpose, Complexities thinking routine(slide1) or the See Think Wonder routine(slide2).  Usually, I change the terms to fit the activity, so in this case I use Observe, Reflect, and Question.  I tell them to observe and question first.  What are you seeing and why is it there?  What other things do you see but not understand?  Then they go back and reflect on what they think the map is of and how it might be part of a bigger map and what that means.   Generally the questions and observation lead the discussion and I let the students work together to talk about what their map parts have and others do not.  

Once students have finished their observations of the map pieces, show them the whole map(slide3) put together and discuss the history of the map.  What does it look like? Is it the same way our maps look today? Why or why not? Have a discussion about when the map was made, how, and who made it, along with the history of the time period.  How do you think maps have changed since then?

Next, show them the map from 1854 and compare and contrast the two maps.  Discuss the changes in history and why the maps may look so different.  Continue going through each of the maps and ask how the maps have changed over time and why.  Explain the importance of using a primary resource for a map as opposed to a secondary resource.  

Finally, show the last two maps and discuss how maps can be used for more than just showing places, but also for seismographic activity, deforestation, etc.  Discuss what has changed in NYC over the last 200 years and discuss why it might be useful to have that old map?   (Writing a historical novel, seeing where ancestors lived, etc.).

Closure:

I generally don't do a wrap up activity, as the students go into their social studies classes and continue learning about maps and creating their own there.   The classroom teacher works with the students on creating their own maps of our town/neighborhood in coordination with the Project Zero Out of Eden project.  


#PZPGH

Nicole Wilkinson
10
 

Jazz Musicians

This project is just the library portion of a much bigger cross-classroom project, utilizing art, music, library, and classroom teachers. This collection first focuses on visual analysis of artworks and photographs as a lead-in for further research into individual musician’s biographies.

During their library time, students are introduced to important Jazz musicians.  Then they research those musicians and put the information they learn together with the information gained from the other special areas and in their classroom to think about how Jazz has changed over time and what made the musicians who they were.  

Day 1: See, Think, Wonder - we look at the photograph together and they come up with their sticky notes for later discussions.

Day 2: Discussion: Who are these people, why are they important, and what did we notice about this painting.  We then compare the painting to the very colorful Duke Ellington photo, followed by a few more of famous musicians.  We discuss the different ways color and diversity is shown and how that is important for the time the music was being created.  

Day 3-5: Students will pick musicians and begin to research about their lives.  They will use our online databases (ie. WorldBook) to get background information.  They will then do an illustration of their person and put in important words/phrases to show how their life shaped who they became.  These drawings are then hung and used for further discussions.

List of possible musicians to research (we use more as needed for the students to work in pairs): Duke Ellington, Dizzy Gillespie, Billie Holiday, Romare Bearden, Louis Armstrong, John Coltrane, Charles Mingus, Charlie Parker, Jellie roll Morton, Thelonious Monk, Count Bassie, Ella Fitzgerald, Miles Davis

The overall grade level project looks at African American music over time and how it has changed from African Tribal songs up thru Jazz in the 50s-60s and beyond.  Then they discuss how it has fused into something new and ever changing.

#PZPGH

Nicole Wilkinson
7
 

The Road to Civil Rights

Essential questions:

  • How can we learn more about history through a photograph?
  • How do social factors, such as racism, influence change?
  • How much power do American citizens have to change government policies?
  • What factors drove the Jim Crow era and segregation after the Civil War?
  • How did Americans push back against discrimination, specifically segregation, and fight for civil rights?

This series of lessons is designed as a broad introduction to the factors leading up to the Civil Rights Movement.  Students will look closely at the 13th, 4th, and 15th amendments to the Constitution. Students will then explore some of the factors leading to and consequences of the rise of segregated America during the Jim Crow era in the years following the Civil War. They will look closely at powerful images that exemplify some of the Jim Crow laws, and then explore some of the court cases and responses of citizens that helped to bring about some changes leading up to and during the Civil Rights Movement in the United States.

Time: 3-4 class periods with optional maker project assessment.

Day 1

Anticipatory set: Have students complete a chalk talk to unravel their definitions of equality vs. racism. Discuss and formally define equality and racism. 

Looking closely: Share the image of the water fountains and notice similarities and differences (Optional opportunity to use the See - Think - Wonder thinking routine). Discuss context of Jim Crow era and explain we will be exploring what factors led to these laws and how people fought to change them. 

Have students look closely at the 13th, 14th, and 15th amendments and dissect the language of the amendments to understand their meaning using the Parts, Purposes, Messages thinking routine. Read page one of iCivics Jim Crow handout. Students should record examples of equality and racism on post it notes as they read. When finished, they can add these post it notes to the chalk talk posters with definitions of equality and racism as they discuss their examples. 

Day 2

Anticipatory set: Use the Imagine if... thinking routine to have groups of students explore challenging Jim Crow era issues.

Looking closely: Read "Jim Crow and the Great Migration" and have students continue to record examples of equality vs. racism on post it notes to add to the chalk talk posters from yesterday. Explore powerful Jim Crow images with a chalk talk using the Reporter's Notebook thinking routine.

Discuss how some people began to speak out against the injustices of the Jim Crow laws, both directly and indirectly. Compare and contrast the approaches of Booker T. Washington and  W. E. B. Du Bois. Then read "I, too" by Langston Hughes. Students should complete the See/Hear - Think - Wonder during their first listen. Then students can deconstruct the poem in groups, paying attention to both the literal and figurative meaning of the metaphor of the kitchen in the poem. 

Exit ticket/Reflection: What are the multiple meanings of the kitchen in the poem, "I, too," by Langston Hughes? What was his purpose for writing this poem?

Day 3

Anticipatory set: Use the Making it Fair: Now, Then, Later thinking routine to start to identify how people could have made these Jim Crow restrictions more fair. 

Looking closely: Read "The Road to Civil Rights" handout from iCivics. Students can add equality vs. racism post its to their original chalk talks. Watch the video of the sit-in reenactment (optional - reenact a sit-in in the classroom). Look closely at images of marches, sit-ins, boycotts, and court cases and use the Reporter's Notebook thinking routine to notice the layers of interactions during the events. 

Optional assessment: Introduce the Journey to Civil Rights maker project. Allow students 3-4 days to work on their artifacts and essay explaining their choices.

#PZPGH

Lara Grogan
31
 

We the People

Essential Questions:

What would cause a people to revolt against their government?

Why does a society need a system of government?

Why is it important for Americans to understand their system of government?

Why is it important for Americans to understand the history of their country?

Understanding Moves: Making Connections, Describe What's There, Uncovering Complexity, Reason with Evidence, Build Explanations

Thinking Moves: See Think Wonder, Parts Purposes Complexities

#PZPGH

Gary Galuska
18
1-24 of 33 Collections