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Found 34 Collections

 

Heroes at the Freer|Sackler

A view of cultural, disputed and everyday heroes in artworks at the Freer|Sackler Museums in support of our X-day work with 6th grade at Whittle School & Studios, 2019.

Shannon Brinkley
10
 

Read and Write Qin Small Seal 认写秦小篆

About This Collection:

This collection was designed by Hongli Holloman, a Chinese language teacher at Washington International School, as a basic introduction to use learning lab for language educators. It is a collection of resources from Emperor Qin Shihuang’s Mausoleum Site Museum, the Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access, and the Smithsonian’s Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery. Each resources includes key information about the resources, as well as ideas for class discussion using Project Zero Global Thinking Routines, and class activities. Feel free to copy the collection and adapt it to your own use.

Keyword: ancient history; artifact; China; sculpture; Chinese; cross-cultural comparison; think puzzle explore; project zero; visible thinking routine; terra cotta; qin shi huang; shihuangdi; shi huang di; Qin Small Scrip; ancient script; terracotta army

Teaching Goals:

To help students review and learn about the origin of Chinese written language and the evolution of the scrips.

Students with proficiency level of Intermediate Low to Intermediate Med would have more reinforcement to advance to Intermediate High Advanced Low level. Please check here to get the description of ACTFL Proficiency Guidelines.

1. Develop international-mindedness through the study of Chinese languages, culture of China, and ideas and issues of global significance.

2. Enable students to communicate in Chinese they have studied to introduce ancient Qin dynasty and its first Emperor.

3. Encourage, through the study of Qin Small Seal, an awareness and appreciation of a variety of perspectives of people from China

4. Develop students’ understanding of the relationship between the languages and cultures with which they are familiar.

5. Develop students’ awareness of the importance of language in relation to other areas of knowledge, such as history and art.

6. Provide students, through language learning and the process of inquiry, with opportunities for intellectual engagement and the development of critical- and creative-thinking skills specifically using Project Zero thinking routines such as PARTS-PURPOSE-COMPLEXITIES, Looking Ten Times Two, THREE Y’S.

7. Provide students with a basis for further study, work and leisure through the use of Chinese.

8. Foster curiosity, creativity and a lifelong enjoyment of language learning.

Standards Targeted:

  1. ACTFL WORLD-READINESS STANDARDS FOR LEARNING LANGUAGES

Communication

Standard 1.1: Students engage in conversations, provide and obtain information, express feelings and emotions, and exchange opinions.

Standard 1.2: Students understand and interpret written and spoken language on a variety of topics.

Standard 1.3: Students present information, concepts, and ideas to an audience of listeners or readers on a variety of topics.

Cultures

Standard 2.2: Students demonstrate an understanding of the relationship between the products and perspectives of the culture studied.

Connections

Standard 3.1: Students reinforce and further their knowledge of other disciplines through the foreign language.
Standard 3.2: Students acquire information and recognize the distinctive viewpoints that are only available through the foreign language and its cultures.

Comparisons

Standard 4.1: Students demonstrate understanding of the nature of language through comparisons of the language studied and their own.

Standard 4.2: Students demonstrate understanding of the concept of culture through comparisons of the cultures studied and their own.

Communities

Standard 5.1: Students use the language both within and beyond the school setting.

Standard 5.2: Students show evidence of becoming life-long learners by using the language for personal enjoyment and enrichment.

IB DP: Language Acquisition Aims

1. Develop international-mindedness through the study of languages, cultures, and ideas and issues of global significance.

2. Enable students to communicate in the language they have studied in a range of contexts and for a variety of purposes.

3. Encourage, through the study of texts and through social interaction, an awareness and appreciation of a variety of perspectives of people from diverse cultures.

4. Develop students’ understanding of the relationship between the languages and cultures with which they are familiar.

5. Develop students’ awareness of the importance of language in relation to other areas of knowledge.

6. Provide students, through language learning and the process of inquiry, with opportunities for intellectual engagement and the development of critical- and creative-thinking skills.

7. Provide students with a basis for further study, work and leisure through the use of an additional language.

8. Foster curiosity, creativity and a lifelong enjoyment of language learning.

Hongli Holloman
22
 

Compare and Contrast: Personal Perspectives in Portraiture

In this activity, students will explore how portraits reflect both the personality of the subject portrayed and the artist's personal view of the subject. They will examine two portraits, both painted by American artist James McNeill Whistler (1834-1903), of his patron British shipping magnate Frederick Richards Leyland (1831-1892). Using looking strategies, students will compare and contrast the artist's perspective of his subject, then will connect the portraits to music as a final activity.

This collection was created for the District of Columbia Public Schools (DCPS) Arts Professional Development Day by the Education Department at the Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery, in collaboration with Tess Porter, Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access.

Tags: Peacock Room, Whistler, portrait

Freer|Sackler Education
6
 

Exploring Korean Art at the Freer|Sackler

This Learning Lab contains introductory materials to help educators explore Korean art from Freer|Sackler collections with students.  It includes the following:

  • a founding history of Korean art collections at the Freer|Sackler
  • an illustrated timeline of Korea
  • a map of major ceramic production sites in Korea
  • images and information regarding rare Buddhist paintings from the Goryeo dynasty (935-1392)
  • definitions and examples of selected clay, decoration, glaze, pigment, and symbol types in Korean art
  • Freer Gallery of Art audio tour selections of Korean art
  • curator videos from Discovering Korea's Past: Interdisciplinary Connections Summer Institute for Educators held at the Freer|Sackler, Summer 2018
  • related educator resources from other museums
  • teacher-created lessons and Learning Lab Collections from Discovering Korea's Past: Interdisciplinary Connections Summer Institute for Educators held at the Freer|Sackler, Summer 2018

Tags: Korea, Goryeo, archaeology, art, celadon, ceramics, painting, symbols, Buddhism

Freer|Sackler Education
113
 

Educating for Global Competence with Contemporary Asian Art

What is global competence?  What are the skills and dispositions of globally competent students?  What role can art play in educating students for global competence?  Teachers can use this Learning Lab Collection as a resource for students to explore themes of global importance in the arts of Asia.  The Collection features two works of contemporary Asian art at the Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery with several tools for students to examine and reflect about the works of art, such as Visible Thinking Routines,  Artful Thinking Routines, or Global Thinking Routines.  For each routine, the rationale and  process is described to help the teacher practice.  The Collection also includes artist interviews and other contextual information about the works of art for teachers and students to deepen their understanding.

This Learning Lab Collection was created to support the The Council of Chief State School Officers (CCSSO) National Teachers of the Year 2018 program.  CCSSO is a nonpartisan, nationwide, nonprofit organization of public officials who head departments of elementary and secondary education in the states, the District of Columbia, the Department of Defense Education Activity, the Bureau of Indian Education and the five U.S. extra-state jurisdictions.  Learn more at https://www.ccsso.org/

Essential Questions to be addressed by this Learning Lab Collection:

  • What are some practical tools teachers can use to look closely and reflect about works of art?
  • How can we use works of art to prepare students to understand the world and participate in it?
  • How do we define global competence and globally competent students?

#NTOY18

Tags:  #AsiaTeachers; Asian; Asia; Freer|Sackler; Project Zero; Global Competence; Global Competency; Visible Thinking; Artful Thinking; Chalk Talk; See-Think-Wonder; 3Ys; 3-2-1 Bridge; Contemporary Asian Art; China; India; Monkeys; Religion; Architecture; Chinese Cultural Revolution; Xu Bing; Terminal; Subodh Gupta; Sculpture; Lacquer; Wood; Brass 

Freer|Sackler Education
22
 

Prehistoric Art

This collection will focus on Prehistoric Art and take you through some of the most magnificent and interesting art from the era. My first resource is based upon Hittite Art. The hittites were a civilization in north-central Anatolia around 1600 BC. Many of the art pieces revolve around Hittite ritual practices. While this civilization left no written pieces, pictures are worth a thousand words and the art they left behind gives you a glimpse of what life was like in 1600 BC. 

The second resource is focused on the Venus of Willendorf, which is an 11.1 centimetre tall venus figurine which was estimated to have been built around 30,000 BC. The sculpture is depicting a naked woman. The exaggerated sexual features can be interpreted as a possible fertility fetish. 

The third resource revolves around ancient sculptures from Jordan.  These sculptures are rather mysterious and lack an sort of gender as well as some human features. The uniqueness and mystery surrounding them brings much attention to them. 

The fourth resource is about the Excavation of Persepolis. Archaeological evidence show that some of the earliest remains of Persepolis come from about 515 BC. It came from inscriptions on the wall of the palace that led archaeologists to believe that Darius 1 built the terrace and the palaces. Another great example of art leading to historical breakthroughs. 

The fifth resource is about the Excavation of Samarra, which is just north of Baghdad. Plenty of Female statuette and pottery were discovered from this excavation. 

The sixth and final resource is about the vicinity of nihavand. Attached are some art pieces from Nihavand. 


Works Cited:

Smithsonian Archives - History Div, Smithsonian Institution. “Smithsonian Learning Lab Resource: Ancient Sculptures from Jordan.” Smithsonian Learning Lab, Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access, 2 Nov. 2015. learninglab.si.edu/q/r/119934. Accessed 17 Feb. 2019.

Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives, Smithsonian Institution. “Smithsonian Learning Lab Resource: Excavation of Persepolis (Iran): Prehistoric Flint Tools [Drawing].” Smithsonian Learning Lab, Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access, 27 Oct. 2015. learninglab.si.edu/q/r/9002. Accessed 17 Feb. 2019.

Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives, Smithsonian Institution. “Smithsonian Learning Lab Resource: Vicinity of Nihavand (Iran): Two Daggers, from Prehistoric Mound of Tepe Giyan [Graphic].” Smithsonian Learning Lab, Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access, 3 Nov. 2015. learninglab.si.edu/q/r/224415. Accessed 17 Feb. 2019.

#AHMC2019

For Resources 7-12 text will be attached to each picture explaining the significance.

Resources 13-18 will be attached with captions to the pictures explaining the significance and how it relates to some of what we have learned and the overall theme as well. 

Quinlan Evans
18
 

Goryeo Period Celadon Etched and Inlaid Decorative Techniques Translated into Watercolor Painting

Korean Goryeo period (918-1392) celadon  has famously elegant surface decorations. The delicate flowers, birds, and fish are incised with thin perfection into the clay pots and accented by inlaid white and black slip. Then the whole design is softly but beautifully highlighted by the glass like jade-green glaze. Using this six part lesson plan, students will research Goryeo celadon, compare its decorative techniques to other similar etched techniques, experiment with unique watercolor techniques to create similar effects, plan their own art work using a celadon like look, create their masterpiece, and evaluate whether they have achieved the desired goal of reproducing the look of Goryeo celadon decoration in watercolor. Completing this process, they will have created a painting that they could not have imagined before they began the exploration into  Goryeo celadon pottery decoration. In the first addendum students will be introduced to techniques using acrylic paste and pouring mediums which can produce an even more realistic appearance of Goyreo celadon incised and inlaid decoration.

Here in part 1. are some examples of green glazed, incised ceramics from Korea's Goryeo period. They are from the Freer Art Gallery's collection. Sort them into three groups according to their type of decoration. Then determine if the type of decoration is related to the time period in which they were created.  Next, take time to explore where this particular decoration style originated and how the Goryeo period potters in Korea perfected the technique. In part 2, compare these pieces to other types of art that are made using  similar etching techniques, such as scrimshaw and leather stamping, Then compare them to watercolor paintings of similar subjects to determine how to reproduce the Goryeo celadon look in watercolor painting. One goal of this learning lab is that students will make connections between different mediums and periods and in that process, discover new ways to use the mediums that they are familiar with. Later, in parts 3 and 4, students will be using the Goryeo celadon designs for inspiration when they practice new techniques and plan their own artwork which they will create in step five of the learning lab. In step 6 the students will evaluate their art works to see if they have achieved their goal of making a painting with the look of Goryeo celadon decoration. Addendum 1.  is not intended to be part of the watercolor lessons because of the time required to do the activities and the considerable mess involved, but it introduces the student to Acrylic mediums that can be used to make pictures that not only look like incised and inlaid Goryeo celadon, but are made with very similar techniques. #AsiaTeachers, #Watercolor, #GoryeoCeladon, #Ceramics, #NewAndCombinedPaintingTechniques. #Etching, #StudentArtProjects, #KoreanHistory, #ScratchedAndImpressedWatercolorPaper. #AcrylicPouringMedium, #AcrylicPasteMedium.

Elizabeth Anne Cox
88
 

Discovering Four Asian Countries Through Celadon Ceramics

In this collection, beautiful celadon ceramic pieces are used to help students explore the art of Celadon. While learning more about the ceramics students will also
 explore the following things: kingdoms, personal objects of value, burial practices, cultural similarities and differences, religious and ceremonial pieces, political influence, kings and noble men,  dynasties, artistry, skilled craftsmanship, treasures, geography and the continent of Asia.

This collection is not comprehensive but hopefully will serve as a starting point to encourage students to research and study  more  about some aspect of Asian-related ceramics, arts, geography, history, cultures, customs or trade . Hopefully  it will encourage interest and value in  field trips to Museums such as the Smithsonian Freer Gallery, as well as short-term /long-term study abroad trips to Asian countries.


Eniola O
14
 

Korean Art: Exploring Artistic Practices

In this activity, students will explore the elements of art and principles of design used in celadon ceramics in order to understand the artistic practices and aesthetics of the Goryeo period (935-1392 CE), an era of great artistic and cultural achievement in Korea.  Many of the Goryeo celadons in the Freer|Sackler's collections originally adorned palaces, Buddhist temples, and private residences of the aristocracy.  Use this activity as an entry point into studying ceramics, Korean art, the Goryeo dynasty, and more.  Click Read More for ideas about how to prompt further inquiry using the Project Zero Visible Thinking Routine "Think / Puzzle / Explore" and resources on the elements of art and principles of design.

#AsiaTeachers

Keywords: clay, pottery, sculpture, vessel, cheongja

Tess Porter
13
 

Korean+Art+Culture+Language

This Learning Lab Collection is designed for students who are studying Korean. Students will explore Korean art from the Freer collection, and learn more about Korean culture, history, and tradition by using artworks. Through the exploring art and learning Korean process, student will develop a greater understanding of the unique aspects of Korean culture and the structure of Korean language. 

Keywords: Korean, Language, Art, Culture, Tradition

#AsiaTeachers

This Learning Lab Collection is following Virginia Department of Education Standards of Learning for World Language: Non-Roman Alphabet Language for character-based language. Click here to find more information (p. 29-46) 

Level 1: Students begin to develop communicative competence in the target language and expand their understanding of the culture(s) of the people who speak the language.

Level 2: Students continue to develop their communicative and cultural competence by interacting orally and in writing with other speakers of the target language, understanding oral and written messages in the language, and making oral and written presentations in the language.

Level 3: Students communicate on a variety of topics at a level commensurate with their study, using structures that are more complex in the language and moving from concrete to more abstract concepts in a variety of time frames.

Level 4: Students continue to develop their communicative and culture competence in the interpersonal, interpretive, and presentational modes of communication.

Level 5: Students are able to exchange and support opinions on a variety of topics related to historical and contemporary events and issues at a proficiency level commensurate with their study. 


SSCCKoreanSchool
25
 

Discovering Korea Through an Object

This collection was created as an introduction to Korea and its culture by focusing on one object in the Freer/Sackler Museum.  "Water dropper in the form of a duck." Interdisciplinary lesson for Media (information literacy, research skills), Art (calligraphy), and Music (children’s songs).  

Susan Schmidt
6
 

China’s Terracotta Army: Exploring the Tomb Complex and Values of China’s First Emperor

In this activity, students will take on the role of archaeologists and make inferences about what objects included in the elaborate tomb complex of China’s First Emperor, Qin Shihuang (259 – 210 BCE) can reveal about his values, afterlife beliefs, and how he saw himself and his world. Students will analyze objects including not only members of the Terracotta Army, a group of approximately 7,000 terracotta soldiers and horses, but also terracotta acrobats, bronze waterfowl, and more. This collection is Part 3 in a series of collections created for a social studies classroom; for more information, click “Read More.”

Objects found in Emperor Qin Shihuang’s elaborate tomb complex, which covers a total area of 17.6 square miles, make up the majority of surviving objects from this significant period in Chinese history. They are some of the best archaeological evidence researchers have for understanding the spiritual beliefs, military practices, and values of the ruler responsible for unifying China for the first time in its history. 

Authors of this collection are the Emperor Qin Shihuang’s Mausoleum Site Museum, the Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access, and the Smithsonian’s Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery.

Tags: archaeology; archaeologist; ancient history; artifact; afterlife; funerary practices; burial; death; spiritual beliefs; military; soldier; sculpture; chinese; world; asia; asian; xi'an; empire; cross-cultural comparison; terra cotta; qin shi huang; shihuangdi; shi huang di; earthenware; ceramics

Emperor Qin Shihuang's Terracotta Army
25
 

Visual Cues to Role and Rank in World Art

Throughout world history artists have used visual cues to communicate role and rank. As a cultural window, art shares insights in to the structure and beliefs of a society. Through compare and contrast questions students analyze the selected works to better understand artistic techniques as well as the cultural mores communicated through each work. This activity was developed at Discovering Korea's Past: Interdisciplinary Connections Summer institute for Educators held at the Freer/Sackler, summer 2018.

Kristen Morrison
13
 

Terracotta Warriors & Figures: Object Analysis

In this activity, students will use visual evidence to try guess the roles of figures found in the elaborate tomb complex of China's First Emperor, Qin Shihuang (259 – 210 BCE), and analyze what they may reveal about his values, how he saw himself, and how he saw his world.  

Objects found in Emperor Qin Shihuang’s elaborate tomb complex, which covers a total area of 17.6 square miles and contains over 7,000 terracotta figures, make up the majority of surviving objects from this significant period in Chinese history. They are some of the best archaeological evidence researchers have for understanding the spiritual beliefs, military practices, and values of the ruler responsible for unifying China for the first time in its history. 

Authors of this collection are the Emperor Qin Shihuang’s Mausoleum Site Museum, the Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access, and the Smithsonian’s Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery.

Keywords: archaeology, archaeologist, ancient history, artifact, afterlife, funerary practices, burial, death, spiritual beliefs, military, soldier, sculpture, chinese, world, asia, asian, xi'an, empire, cross-cultural comparison, terra cotta, qin shi huang, shihuangdi, shi huang di, earthenware, ceramics, pottery, terracotta army

Emperor Qin Shihuang's Terracotta Army
16
 

Student Activities | Exploring Point of View

How do you see the world? What's your point of view? What informs, shapes, and affects it? What does it mean to take on another person's point of view, and why is it important? This Learning Lab activity for students explores global issues, perspectives, and close looking through two artworks by Ahmed Mater, a contemporary Saudi artist. In addition to the two artworks, this collection also includes guiding questions, the gallery guide for the Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery exhibition "Symbolic Cities: The Work of Ahmed Mater," and an optional article for high-school students.



Tag: Middle East, Near East, Saudi Arabia, Mecca, Urbanization, Project Zero, Asia Society, See Think Wonder, 3 Ys, point of view

Freer|Sackler Education
5
 

Teaching Resources | Symbolic Cities: The Work of Ahmed Mater

How do you see the world? What’s your point of view? What informs, shapes, and affects it? What does it mean to take on another person’s point of view, and why is it important? This teaching collection features two artworks from the Smithsonian’s Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery by Ahmed Mater, a contemporary Saudi artist. Use this collection to introduce global competency and close looking in the classroom.

In addition to teaching strategies and two artworks by Ahmed Mater, this collection also includes: an article on global thinking routines; a digital version of the book "Educating for Global Competence: Preparing Our Youth to Engage the World;" the gallery guide to the Freer Gallery of Art and the Arthur M. Sackler Gallery exhibition "Symbolic Cities, the Work of Ahmed Mater;" an article about Ahmed Mater's "Symbolic Cities" exhibition; and a link to a Learning Lab student activities set using the strategies and resources compiled here.

This collection was created to support the 2016 CCSSO Teachers of the Year Day at the Smithsonian.

Tag: Middle East, Near East, Saudi Arabia, Mecca, Urbanization, Project Zero, Asia Society, See Think Wonder, 3 Ys
Freer|Sackler Education
11
 

AP Art History Curriculum Framework: Focus on "Jahangir Preferring a Sufi Shaikh to Kings"

This educational resource is designed especially for teachers and students in Advanced Placement (AP) Art History courses. It focuses on an artwork from the Freer|Sackler collection, Jahangir Preferring a Sufi Shaikh to Kings; one of the 250 works that are featured in the AP Art History curriculum. In particular, this artwork is in Content Area 8 - South, East, and Southeast Asia.

The AP Art History curriculum stresses the investigation of four key areas for each artwork: Form, Function, Content, and Context. This resource will touch on all four areas and can be adapted for use.



Tags: Album, AP, Art History, emperor, India, Jahangir, manuscript, Mughal dynasty, Muslim, portrait, Project Zero, See/Think/Wonder


Background Note to Teachers

India's Mughal emperors, who reigned over a vast and wealthy empire that extended over most of the South Asian subcontinent between the 16th and 19th centuries, were passionate about lavish manuscripts and paintings. Between 1556 and 1657, the greatest Mughal patrons—the emperors Akbar, Jahangir and Shah Jahan—formed grand workshops that brought together and nurtured India's leading painters, calligraphers and illuminators. This resource focuses on just one of the paintings created for Jahangir, but the Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery form one of the world's most important repositories of Mughal and Persian painting. To search our collection, refer to http://www.asia.si.edu/collections/edan/default.cf....


Related Standards

  • C3 D2.His.1.6-8 - Analyze connections among events and developments in broader historical contexts.
  • C3 D2.His.2.6-8 - Classify series of historical events and developments as examples of change and/or continuity.
  • C3 D2.His.14.6-8 - Explain multiple causes and effects of events and developments in the past.
  • C3 D2.His.15.6-8 - Evaluate the relative influence of various causes of events and developments in the past.
  • CCSS.ELA-Literacy.CCRA.R.7 - Integrate and evaluate content presented in diverse media and formats, including visually and quantitatively, as well as in words.
  • NAEA | Anchor Standard 7 - Perceive and analyze artistic work.
  • NAEA | Anchor Standard 8 - Interpret intent and meaning in artistic work.
  • NAEA | Anchor Standard 11 - Relate artistic ideas and works with societal, cultural and historical context to deepen understanding.
  • NCHS WH Era 6 | Standard 1B - The student understands the encounters between Europeans and peoples of Sub-Saharan Africa, Asia, and the Americas in the late 15th and early 16th centuries.
  • NCHS WH Era 6 | Standard 3C - The student understands the rise of the Safavid and Mughal empires.
  • NCHS WH Era 6 | Standard 6A - The student understands major global trends from 1450 to 1770.
  • NCSS 1 : Culture - Social studies programs should include experiences that provide for the study of culture and cultural diversity.
  • NCSS 2 : Time, Continuity, and Change - Social studies programs should include experiences that provide for the study of the past and its legacy.
  • NCSS 3 : People, Places, and Environments - Social studies programs should include experiences that provide for the study of people, places, and environments.


Resources

This collection has been compiled from materials available on the Freer|Sackler website. In addition, these resources have been especially useful:

Milo Cleveland Beach, The Imperial Image: Paintings for the Mughal Court. Washington, DC: Smithsonian Institution, 2012.

Print and online materials related to "Worlds within Worlds: Imperial Paintings from India and Iran," an exhibition held at the Freer|Sackler from July 28 through Sept. 16, 2012.


Freer|Sackler Education
12
 

Art and Science Intersections at the Freer|Sackler

This Learning Lab was designed by the Education Department of the Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery as a basic introduction for educators to the intersections of art and science.  Each image links to resources,  which include Freer|Sackler works of art, exhibition information, 3-D tours, videos, online interactives, and articles.  Feel free to copy the collection and adapt it for your students.

Keywords: Buddha, Buddhism, lacquer, stone, bronze, carving, conservation, technology, China, bells, music, sound, Resound, 3-D, STEM, STEAM, Metropolitan Museum, Walters Art Museum, Smithsonian, arts, science 

Freer|Sackler Education
17
 

An Introduction to Japanese Painting

This collection was designed by the Education Department of the Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery as a basic introduction to Japanese painting for educators. It is a collection of artworks from the museum's permanent collection that draw from a wide variety of formats, styles, media, and subjects that represent many of the major trends in Japanese painting. Each image includes key information about the artwork, as well as ideas for class discussion, lesson components, and/or links to resources such as videos and articles which provide additional information about the artwork. Feel free to copy the collection and adapt it to your own use. 

Keywords: Buddha, Hokusai, Mount Fuji, watercolor, bodhisattva, Fugen, Sōtatsu, cherry blossoms, seasons, Genji, crane, emakibyobukakemono, ukiyo-e, map, teacher, student, autumn, Japan, Japanese art, landscape, Edo period, Buddhism, Heian period, water, ocean, wave, boat, flower, insect, Muromachi period, river, surimono



Freer|Sackler Education
12
 

Timeline of Ancient China (5000 BCE - 220 CE)

This collection contains an interactive timeline of the art and archaeology of Ancient China from about 5000 BCE to 220 CE. It includes information on each period in this time range: Late Neolithic period, Erlitou culture, Shang dynasty, Western Zhou dynasty, Eastern Zhou dynasty, Qin dynasty, and Han dynasty; each with a representative object from each time period, ranging from a jade cong to a bronze incense burner.

Authors of this collection are the Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery and the Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access.

Tags: art history; artifact; archaeologist; ritual; Chinese; asia; Asian; warring states period; terracotta army; terra cotta;


Freer|Sackler Education
7
 

China’s Terracotta Army: The Terracotta Warriors

In this activity, students explore the Terracotta Army, a group of approximately 7,000 terracotta figures of warriors and horses made for China’s First Emperor, Qin Shihuang (259 – 210 BCE). After learning about Qin dynasty (221 – 206 BCE) afterlife beliefs analyzing the types of figures, layout of pits, and other object included, students will create their own arguments about what the Terracotta Army reveals about Emperor Qin Shihuang. This collection is Part 2 in a series of collections created for a social studies classroom; for more information, click “Read More.”

Objects found in Emperor Qin Shihuang’s elaborate tomb complex, which covers a total area of 17.6 square miles, make up the majority of surviving objects from this significant period in Chinese history. They are some of the best archaeological evidence researchers have for understanding the spiritual beliefs, military practices, and values of the ruler responsible for unifying China for the first time in its history. 

Authors of this collection are the Emperor Qin Shihuang’s Mausoleum Site Museum, the Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access, and the Smithsonian’s Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery.

Tags: archaeology; archaeologist; ancient history; artifact; afterlife; funerary practices; burial; death; spiritual beliefs; military; soldier; sculpture; chinese; world; asia; asian; xi'an; empire; cross-cultural comparison; think puzzle explore; strategy; project zero; visible thinking routine; terra cotta; qin shi huang; shihuangdi; shi huang di; earthenware; ceramics

Emperor Qin Shihuang's Terracotta Army
18
 

China’s Terracotta Army: Introduction to China’s First Emperor and the Terracotta Army

In this activity, students will learn about the life, achievements, and historical legacy of the First Emperor of China, Emperor Qin Shihuang (259 – 210 BCE). In order to understand why he, and the developments he shaped, are so historically significant, students will explore objects from the Qin (221 – 206 BCE) and Han (206 BCE – 220 CE) dynasties and use information learned to create arguments about the past. This collection is Part 1 in a series of collections created for a social studies classroom; for more information, click “Read More.”

Objects found in Emperor Qin Shihuang’s elaborate tomb complex, which covers a total area of 17.6 square miles, make up the majority of surviving objects from this significant period in Chinese history. They are some of the best archaeological evidence researchers have for understanding the spiritual beliefs, military practices, and values of the ruler responsible for unifying China for the first time in its history. 

Authors of this collection are the Emperor Qin Shihuang’s Mausoleum Site Museum, the Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access, and the Smithsonian’s Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery.

Tags: archaeology; archaeologist; ancient history; artifact; afterlife; funerary practices; burial; death; spiritual beliefs; military; soldier; sculpture; chinese; world; asia; asian; xi'an; empire; leader; see wonder connect; headlines; strategy; project zero; visible thinking routine; terra cotta; qin shi huang; shihuangdi; shi huang di; earthenware; ceramics

Emperor Qin Shihuang's Terracotta Army
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China's Terracotta Army: Information and Teaching Resources

This collection contains information and teaching resources on the Terracotta Army, a group of approximately 7,000 life-size terracotta figures created for the tomb complex of China's First Emperor, Qin Shihuang (259 – 210 BCE). Resources in this collection cover a wide range of topics, including: the discovery of the Terracotta Army, Emperor Qin Shihuang, the unification of China, Qin dynasty (221 – 206 BCE) spiritual beliefs, how the terracotta warriors were made, the different types of terracotta warriors, and the types of bronze weaponry found in the Terracotta Army pits. This collection also contains three interactives: a timeline of ancient Chinese history, a map of the tomb complex, and maps of battle formations in the Terracotta Army pits.

Objects found in Emperor Qin Shihuang’s elaborate tomb complex, which covers a total area of 17.6 square miles, make up the majority of surviving objects from this significant period in Chinese history.They are some of the best archaeological evidence researchers have for understanding the spiritual beliefs, military practices, and values of the ruler responsible for unifying China for the first time in its history. 

Authors of this collection are the Emperor Qin Shihuang’s Mausoleum Site Museum, the Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access, and the Smithsonian’s Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery.

Tags: archaeology; archaeologist; ancient history; artifact; afterlife; funerary practices; burial; death; religion; military; soldier; sculpture; chinese; world history; asia; asian; xi'an; empire; terra cotta; qin shi huang; shihuangdi; shi huang di; earthenware; ceramics

Emperor Qin Shihuang's Terracotta Army
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