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Found 77 Collections

 

Experience of black hat making

Black millinery plays a big role in African American history and to this day shapes the evolution of black culture.

mariah beard
6
 

Black Codes

information aned pictures on the black codes

Rhiannon Lawrence
5
 

Black History: Black Heritage Stamp Series

A topical collection featuring African-American leaders, inventors, activists, sports figures, and culture-shapers whose lives changed history. Teaching Tips can be found in "notes."

These stamps are part of the Black Heritage Stamp Series. U.S. postage stamps were in use for nearly a century before Booker T. Washington became the first African American to appear on one. A handful of additional black history-related designs appeared between 1940 and 1978, when the U.S. Postal Service introduced the Black Heritage series. USPS continues to issue a stamp featuring a notable Black American every February in conjunction with Black History Month and at other times during the year. Today the Black Heritage issues are the longest-running U.S. stamp series.
Emily Murgia
38
 

Artifacts at Historically Black Colleges and Universities

"Artifacts at Historically Black Colleges and Universitities" includes ten artifacts from Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) throughout the United States. This collection can be used to educate students about HBCU culture, history, alumni, founders, and achievement.

Le'Passion Darby
12
 

Black Millinery

Hats are a large part of many cultures. In black history hats have been extravagant accessories. My collection features both African and African American styled hats.

Janan Muhammad
10
 

Black History Month - Celebrating the Rich Cultural History of our Country

This Learning Lab uses interactive virtual tours, videos, images, and much more to Celebrate the Rich Cultural History of African American History in honor or Black History Month.

Students can explore this Learning Lab independently. Learning exercises and worksheets have been provided to help enhance the exploration of the content for the NMAAHC Black Superheroes 

Wakanda Learning Lab is this? #SJ2019LP

Kara MontgomeryRoa
29
 

Black Panther and Black Superheroes

Wakanda Learning Lab is this? 

This Learning Lab explores the importance of representation in popular media. How are people portrayed? Why are they portrayed? What does this say about a people in a society and the society itself? How do these messages affect and inform us about others and ourselves?

First, how are African Americans represented in popular media. Second, how African, the African Diaspora, and African American culture are represented in Black Panther (both as a comic book character and as part of the modern Marvel cinematic universe) and through other superhero lore. 

The National Museum of African American History and Culture celebrates the museum's acquirement of the movie costume of the iconic and groundbreaking Marvel comic book character Black Panther. The character of Black Panther (King T'Challa of Wakanda), and his iconic suit, debuted in the Marvel cinematic universe in the 2015 film Captain America: Civil War, and featured in his self-titled movie Black Panther in 2018. Since the debut of Black Panther (King T'Challa of Wakanda) in the Fantastic Four #52 in July 1966, Black Panther has been a trailblazer for the black superheroes that have followed him in print and on screen. 

Students can explore this Learning Lab independently. Learning exercises and worksheets have been provided to help enhance the exploration of the content. 

Keyword: nmaahc, African, American, Black, Panther, Marvel, T'Challa, Wakanda, suit, comic, superhero, super, hero, civil war, Falcon, Bumblebee, Vixen, Storm, Nick Fury, Luke Cage, DC, universe, Green Lantern, Misty


NMAAHC Education
26
 

The Black Arts Movement

“Sometimes referred to as 'the artistic sister of the Black Power Movement,' the Black Arts Movement stands as the single most controversial moment in the history of African-American literature—possibly in American literature as a whole. Although it fundamentally changed American attitudes both toward the function and meaning of literature as well as the place of ethnic literature in English departments, African-American scholars as prominent as Henry Louis Gates, Jr., have deemed it the 'shortest and least successful' movement in African American cultural history."--"Black Creativity: On the Cutting Edge," Time (Oct. 10, 1994)

This topical collection includes background information as well as examples of poetry and art from the Black Arts Movement. Two excerpts from essays are also included. There are also some examples of works from artists who rejected the premise of the Black Arts Movement.

Students could use this collection as a starting point for further research or to create an illustrated timeline of the movement. Works could be analyzed for their reflection or rejection of themes like: black nationalism, self-determination, "the black is beautiful" movement, and liberation. Students could also evaluate the merits of the arguments for and against a "black arts movement" as articulated by Karenga and Saunders in the text excerpts.

This is a work-in-progress based on the digitized materials within the Smithsonian Learning Lab's collection--it is not meant to be wholly definitive or authoritative.

Kate Harris
41
 

Descrimination against blacks

For years upon years we've came across many racial issue all throughout history. More specifically , the way blacks were treated. Being a person of color caused controversy and still does today. This collection focuses on African American directly.The issue has yet been dealt with but it has progressed over time, things that were happening in the past aren't happening now in today's society. It still is not good , but it has gotten better. America count just get along due to skin colors. Finally in 2008 we had our first colored president that made history. People of color cultural background is looked down upon as something bad .

lona carroll
3
 

Freedmen's Bureau

In 1865, it was established to help black slaves and poor whites in the South. About 4 million were freed which it resulted in the victory for the Union.

Gabriela Garcia
5
 

Ku Klux Klan

founded in 1866 and extend into the Southern states by 1970. Its members were waged underground by violence and intimidation directed towards white and black republican. They were founded in Tennessee. 

Charley Jacobson
5
 
 

Black History Month Family Festival: Interviews, Performances, Highlights

This collections comes from a Black History Month family festival created to complement the exhibition, "The Black List." Included here are a gallery tour with curator Ann Shumard, and interviews with puppeteer Schroeder Cherry, guitarist Warner Williams, the Taratibu Youth Association Step Dance Group, silhouette artist Lauren Muney and collage artist Michael Albert.

Philippa Rappoport
7
 

African American History Month Resources

These classroom resources from different Smithsonian museums focus on African American history and culture. 



Tag: black history 

Philippa Rappoport
25
 

The Black Power Movement

Teaching about the Black Power Movement can be challenging, but has rich rewards. Misconceptions about the Black Power Movement abound, but the ability to contrast their strategies and aims with the earlier Civil Rights Movement allows Social Studies teachers to discuss the complex ways that social movements evolve, change, and respond to the times. In addition, a study of the Black Power Movement helps give context for a broader study of the economic and political shifts in the 1970s and 1980s and the rise of identity politics. This teaching collection includes a variety of resources that could be used to teach about the Black Power Movement, organized into sections for:

-People in the Movement

-Goals and Strategies of the Movement

-Teaching Activities

General guiding questions for this collection include:

-What were the distinct problems that the Black Power Movement tried to address? Do they remain today?

-What were the strategies of the Black Power Movement? Do you agree or disagree with these?

-Why and how do social movements develop and evolve?

-What defines a successful social movement? Was the Black Power Movement successful?

- Can a social movement survive beyond the demise of its leadership?

-What is the role of the arts in promoting the ideals of social movements?

This is a work-in-progress based on the digitized materials within the Smithsonian Learning Lab's collection--it is not meant to be wholly definitive or authoritative.

Kate Harris
31
 

Black Panther and Black Superhereos

Wakanda Learning Lab is this? 

This Learning Lab explores the importance of representation in popular media. How are people portrayed? Why are they portrayed? What does this say about a people in a society and the society itself? How do these messages affect and inform us about others and ourselves?

First, how are African Americans are represented in popular media. Second, how African, the African Diaspora, and African American culture are represented in Black Panther (both as a comic book character and as part of the modern Marvel cinematic universe) and through other superhero lore. 

The National Museum of African American History and Culture celebrates the museum's acquirement of the movie costume of the iconic and groundbreaking Marvel comic book character Black Panther. The character of Black Panther (King T'Challa of Wakanda), and his iconic suit, debuted in the Marvel cinematic universe in the 2015 film Captain America: Civil War, and featured in his self-titled movie Black Panther in 2018. Since the debut of Black Panther (King T'Challa of Wakanda) in the Fantastic Four #52 in July 1966, Black Panther has been a trailblazer for the black superheroes that have followed him in print and on screen. 

Students can explore this Learning Lab independently. Learning exercises and worksheets have been provided to help enhance the exploration of the content. 

Keyword: nmaahc, African, American, Black, Panther, Marvel, T'Challa, Wakanda, suit, comic, superhero, super, hero, civil war, wakanda


Tabbetha Harrison
19
 

The Black Power Movement

Teaching about the Black Power Movement can be challenging, but has rich rewards. Misconceptions about the Black Power Movement abound, but the ability to contrast their strategies and aims with the earlier Civil Rights Movement allows Social Studies teachers to discuss the complex ways that social movements evolve, change, and respond to the times. In addition, a study of the Black Power Movement helps give context for a broader study of the economic and political shifts in the 1970s and 1980s and the rise of identity politics. This teaching collection includes a variety of resources that could be used to teach about the Black Power Movement, organized into sections for:

-People in the Movement

-Goals and Strategies of the Movement

-Teaching Activities

General guiding questions for this collection include:

-What were the distinct problems that the Black Power Movement tried to address? Do they remain today?

-What were the strategies of the Black Power Movement? Do you agree or disagree with these?

-Why and how do social movements develop and evolve?

-What defines a successful social movement? Was the Black Power Movement successful?

- Can a social movement survive beyond the demise of its leadership?

-What is the role of the arts in promoting the ideals of social movements?

This is a work-in-progress based on the digitized materials within the Smithsonian Learning Lab's collection--it is not meant to be wholly definitive or authoritative.

Susan Ogilvie
31
 

Did the Black Panther Party Help or Hurt the Civil Rights Movement?

#TeachingInquiry

1. What did members of the Black Panther Party look like?
2. How did the Black Panther Party help their communities?
3. How was the Black Panther Party viewed by those outside the group?

Richard Duffy
30
 

Remembering the Civil Rights Movement

I chose  the 1960's Civil Rights Movement as my project because it is important to reflect upon how difficult it was for blacks to gain equal rights and how much resilience and determination was necessary. Furthermore, it is interesting to note how relatively recent the Civil Rights Movement is compared to today. My black peers may have had grandmothers or grandfathers that had to fight for their right to vote. The Civil Rights movement is a special time in history that demands attention and remembrance!

Bella Franchina
10
 

Civil Rights Movement

I chose  the 1960's Civil Rights Movement as my project because it is important to reflect upon how difficult it was for blacks to gain equal rights and how much resilience and determination was necessary. Furthermore, it is interesting to note how relatively recent the Civil Rights Movement is compared to today. My black peers may have had grandmothers or grandfathers that had to fight for their right to vote. The Civil Rights movement is a special time in history that demands attention and remembrance!

Bella Franchina
10
 

Ku Klux Klan


The Ku Klux Klan is one of several white supremacy organizations in the united states, Dedicated to opposing civil rights for blacks, jews, and other ethnic, racial, social or religious groups.

Made by~ Payton troutman and Dante' Lallo

Dante' Lallo
5
 

Read Between the Brushstrokes: Using Visual Art as a Historical Source

This Learning Lab from the National Museum of African American History and Culture (NMAAHC) will explore the connection between visual art and history. 

When studying history, it is important to remember that all historical sources do not look the same. Visual art, being an active response to a stimulus, serves as a mirror to the contemporary landscape. Art engages in a conversation with history while acting as a visual expression of contemporary thoughts and ideas.

Through the visual art piece "New Age of Slavery" by Patrick Campbell (2014), students will learn more about the events and cultural context of the contemporary landscape including the pattern of police brutality against African Americans and the Black Lives Matter Movement while honing their visual literacy competency. Students can use this Learning Lab collection to help sharpen their historical thinking skills and expand their conceptions of historical sources.

keyword: NMAAHC, African American, slavery, flag, American, 13th Amendment, visual art, Black Lives Matter, lynching, United States, visual literacy

NMAAHC Education
12
 

Practice Reading Portraits--Black History Month

This collection was created for a brief warm-up activity where students practiced analyzing portraits of recognizable figures as a group, prior to working on their own portrait analysis. Portraits of Muhammad Ali, Serena Williams, Rosa Parks, and Booker T. Washington are included and they vary in detail and medium.

The last resource, a PDF file, is a teacher's guide created by the National Portrait Gallery. Teachers should lead discussion about the portraits using suggested questions in the guide, and then let students search for a portrait of someone of their own choosing to analyze.

tags: civil rights, sports, tennis, boxing, African-American, black history, analysis, comparison

Kate Harris
6
 

Investigating the American Prison System through Constitutional Law

This collection contains materials for a 2-part lesson on the prison system in America. Students will consider the prison system in America through the lens of the 8th amendment, comparing their interpretations of "cruel and unusual punishment" and "excessive" bail to that of the American government's interpretation. Ultimately, students will come to the understanding that laws can be manipulated and distorted by those who hold power and that interpreting law is a highly political act with enormous ramifications. 

This lesson is part of a larger study of Black American history, so the content portion of this lesson will focus on the way in which the prison system disproportionately disadvantages Black Americans. This lesson will end up with an artistic activity that will ask students to create an artistic piece about the 13th Amendment, inspired by Mark Bradford's "Amendment #8." 

See the attached lesson plan for additional details. #SAAMteach

Naomi Tsai
8
1-24 of 77 Collections