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Women Loving Women

National Museum of American History

Women

Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery

Women Rising

National Museum of American History

Celebrating Women

National Museum of American History

Women's March on Washington

National Museum of American History

Women's March on Washington

National Museum of American History

National Organization for Women

National Museum of American History

Respect Women of Color

National Museum of American History

National League of Women Voters

National Museum of American History

When Women Vote, Women WIn.

National Museum of American History

Women in Public Office

National Museum of American History

Old Women

Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery

Two women

Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery

Two women

Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery

Women's Equality Day

National Museum of American History

Women Rising Up

National Museum of American History

Two women

Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery

Women's Activities

Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery

Women’s Movement pendant

National Museum of American History
This pendant designed by Shirley Aidekman is a modern copy of the original “Jailed for Freedom” pins. It both reminds of and honors the sacrifice the original pin recipients made in the name of woman’s suffrage and equality.

In January 1917, members of the National Woman's Party (NWP) became the first people to picket the White House. Protesting the government's failure to pass a constitutional amendment enfranchising women, NWP members, led by Alice Paul, began picketing the White House. Their purple, white, and gold banners asked President Woodrow Wilson, "Mr. President what will you do for woman suffrage?" and "Mr. President how long must women wait for liberty?" Tolerated at first, the "silent sentinels" were increasingly seen as an embarrassment to the administration. As the United States entered the First World War, the NWP pickets' banners often pointed out the hypocrisy of fighting for democracy and freedom in Europe while denying it to women at home. In June 1917, the D.C. police began arresting the picketers for obstructing sidewalk traffic. 90 women were sentenced to terms ranging from 60 days to six months in the Occoquan Workhouse. When their demands to be treated as political prisoners were ignored, they went on hunger strikes and were forcibly fed. The publicity surrounding their ordeal generated public sympathy for the suffragists and their cause. In December, 1917, at a meeting in their honor, the pickets who had been jailed were presented with small silver pins in the shape of prison doors with heart-shaped locks.

Poster from Women's March on Washington with "Women are Perfect"

National Museum of African American History and Culture
Poster with artist Jessica Sabogal's print “Women are Perfect (If You Let Them)” from the 2017 Women’s March on Washington. The poster is printed in shades of yellow and brown. At the top [WOMEN ARE PERFECT] is printed in yellow. The center of the poster has the image of a smiling young girl. The artist's mark of two interlocking branches with leaves is printed on the girl's chest. She has natural hair and is looking upward. At the bottom right in brown is [@WOMENSMARCH + THEAMPLIFIERFOUNDATION.ORG + JESSICA SABOGAL]. The design is repeated on the back.

Representative Women

National Portrait Gallery
Representative Women

Between 1860 and 1880, it became common for American reformers to gather on stages—then called lyceums—to promote abolition, temperance, education reform, and women’s rights. Lyceum associations allowed suffragists to speak. In their lectures, suffragists addressed men and women of diverse backgrounds—across state, racial, and economic divides—and reached wider audiences than through women’s organizations alone.

Representative Women is a combinative portrait that brings together seven women who were active on the lecture circuit. The visual power of the image stems from its ability to reveal both the cohesiveness of the movement and the strong individual personalities within it. Clockwise from the top are portraits of Lucretia Coffin Mott, Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Mary Livermore, Lydia Maria Francis Child, Susan B. Anthony, and Sara Jane Lippincott, who surround the central figure of Anna Elizabeth Dickinson. At the time, Dickinson was more popular than Mark Twain and held the distinction of being the highest paid woman on the lecture circuit.

Entre 1860 y 1880 era común que los reformistas estadounidenses se reunieran en espacios que llamaban liceos para promover la abolición, la templanza, la reforma educativa y los derechos de la mujer. Las asociaciones de los liceos permitían hablar a las sufragistas. En estas conferencias podían

dirigirse a hombres y mujeres de diversos trasfondos geográficos, raciales y económicos, logrando alcanzar públicos más amplios que mediante las organizaciones femeninas.

Representative Women es un retrato combinado de siete mujeres que estuvieron activas en el circuito de conferencias. El poder visual de la imagen se debe a que revela tanto la cohesión del movimiento como la individualidad de las fuertes personalidades que lo componían. En dirección del reloj, desde arriba, vemos a Lucretia Coffin Mott, Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Mary Livermore, Lydia Maria Francis Child, Susan B. Anthony y Sara Jane Lippincott, quienes rodean a la figura central de Anna Elizabeth Dickinson. Para esa época, Dickinson era más popular que Mark Twain y ostentaba la distinción de ser la mujer mejor pagada del circuito de conferencias.

Transkei Women

Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives
Transkei Women, 1947. Two women are lying on the ground face to face. The woman on the right is playing with the other woman's short hair. The woman on the right is wearing a head warp and cloth wrapped around her. There are other women sitting and standing in the background. The people have come together for the Sunday morning beer drinking and discussion of politics among the people. Photograph by Constance Stuart Larrabee, 1947.

In 1947, Constance Staurt Larrabee visited the Transkei. She was there researching the housing problems in Southern Africa.

There are no prints of this negative in the Constance Stuart Larrabee Collection. EEPA produced an 8x10 study print and 6x6 contact print for reference purposes.

The cataloging of the Constance Stuart Larrabee Collection was supported by a grant from The Smithsonian Women's Committee.

Transkei Women

Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives
Transkei Women, 1947. There are several women standing in the grass. One woman on the far back right is holding a child. They are wearing large head wraps, jewelry, skirts, and long tops. Photograph by Constance Stuart Larrabee, 1947.

In 1947, Constance Staurt Larrabee visited the Transkei. She was there researching the housing problems in Southern Africa.

There are no prints of this negative in the Constance Stuart Larrabee Collection. EEPA produced an 8x10 study print for reference purposes.

The cataloging of the Constance Stuart Larrabee Collection was supported by a grant from The Smithsonian Women's Committee.
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