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"Boy On the Straight-Back Chair" Rehearsal

Smithsonian Institution Archives
Also known as 68191.

Digital contact sheet available.

Rehearsal for the Division of Performing Arts production of "Boy On the Straight-Back Chair," a play by Ronald Tavel, at the Museum of Natural History.

"Carboniferous Coal Swamp Forests" Exhibit

Smithsonian Institution Archives
See also Record Unit 95, Box 44, Folder 12.

Updated as part of the Exhibits Modernization Program.

In Hall of Fossil Plants and Invertebrates at Museum of Natural History.

"Carl-Henning Pedersen" Art Exhibition

Smithsonian Institution Archives
Also known as 68183.

Digital contact sheet available.

"Carl-Henning Pedersen" art exhibition at the Museum of Natural History, sponsored by Smithsonian Institution Traveling Exhibition Service (SITES), with Secretary S. Dillon Ripley, Vice President Spiro Agnew, and Judy Agnew.

"Carl-Henning Pedersen" Art Exhibition

Smithsonian Institution Archives
Also known as 68184.

Digital contact sheet available.

"Carl-Henning Pedersen" art exhibition at the Museum of Natural History, sponsored by Smithsonian Institution Traveling Exhibition Service (SITES), with Secretary S. Dillon Ripley, Vice President Spiro Agnew, and Judy Agnew.

"Color Me Mankind" Exhibition

Smithsonian Institution Archives
Digital contact sheet available.

"Color Me Mankind" exhibition at the National Museum of History and Technology, now known as the National Museum of American History.

"Echinoderms" Exhibit

Smithsonian Institution Archives
See also Record Unit 95, Box 44, Folder 12.

Updated as part of the Exhibits Modernization Program.

In Hall of Fossil Plants and Invertebrates at Museum of Natural History.

"Eocene Whale-Like Mammal" Exhibit

Smithsonian Institution Archives
Basilosaurus cetoides "Owen," a fossil Eocene whale found in Alabama, on display Museum of Natural History.

"Grant King Sprint Racer" model kit box

National Museum of American History
Grant King model car kit box explains Grant King's role in the Black American Racers on the sides of the box. King was BAR's chief mechanic for the Formula 5000 race car including the 1975 inaugural Long Beach Grand Prix in Long Beach, CA. King was an iconic Indianapolis 500 mechanic in the 1960s and 1970s. He was also one of the best United States Auto Club (USAC) sprint car constructors during this period and served on the board of directors at USAC in 1975. Miller hired King as his Formula 5000 chief mechanic because King did not have any racial bias that was prevalent of the era because he was Asian. King's popularity and mechanical skill in auto racing warranted this "Grant King Sprint Racer" model kit sold in hobby shops and retailers nationwide in the 1970s.

In 1969, Len Miller and his brother Dexter for Miller Racing to race hot rods on the drag racing circuit in Pennsylvania, New Jersey and the Northeast. With success on the racetrack he formed Vanguard Racing in 1972 and was the first African American to enter a car in the Indianapolis 500. He then went on to found the Black American Racers Association in 1973. The goal of the organization was to “unify African-American drivers in all types of racing – stock car, open wheel, and drag racing -- pave the way for greater success and introduce race fans to African-American’s history in motorsports.”

Later that same year the Black American Racers, Inc. (BAR) was formed with Benny Scott as their second generation African-American driver. Also in 1973, BAR became the first team to have an African American driver compete in England. In 1975, BAR driver Benny Scott would break the color barrier at the Long Beach Grand Prix, when the team entered a Formula 5000 car in the inaugural race. Len and Benny Scott were inducted into the Black Athletes Hall of Fame for their achievements in motorsports in 1976. In 1978, BAR experienced a setback when their driver Tommy Thompson was killed in an accident at the Trenton Speedway. Many of the team members took a break after this tragedy and in the 1980s the team turned toward stock car racing.

"Guard" kachina

National Museum of the American Indian

"Harvest" kachina

National Museum of the American Indian

"Hello Boys! Become an Erector Master Engineer!"

Smithsonian Magazine

Christmas of 1918 was just months away, and the United States — immersed in the war effort — was considering calling off Santa. Perhaps parents should invest in Liberty bonds rather than in toys, the powers-that-be reasoned. Why should toys be saved when so many other items were being sacrificed during wartime?

Addressing the Council of National Defense in a special meeting, an energetic businessman from New Haven, Connecticut, explained why. America, argued A. C. Gilbert, was the home of educational toys, toys that prepared our boys for adulthood. He also brought examples. Soon, the Secretaries of War, the Navy, Commerce and the Interior were playing with tiny submarines and engines, reading children's books and tinkering with A. C. Gilbert's own popular creation: the Erector set.

He was touted in the press that year as "The Man Who Saved Christmas," but as author Bruce Watson points out, A. C. Gilbert and his trusty Erector sets also saved "rainy afternoons from boredom" and "inquiring minds...from the tedium of science textbooks." From 1913, when he released his first boxes of steel girders, nuts and bolts, till his death in 1961, A. C. Gilbert was inseparable from the popular toy, and the toy was inseparable from American boyhood.

Whether as a champion pole-vaulter, a professional magician or a purveyor of constructive fun, A. C. Gilbert set out to be the very best — and encouraged the same drive in his young customers. Times and toys have changed, and Gilbert's Erector sets and science kits now sell only among collectors. But the fond memories of millions of grown-up "Erector Engineers" — including our author — live on.

"Jannis Spyropoulos" Exhibition; Luncheon for Robert P. Multhauf

Smithsonian Institution Archives
Digital contact sheet available.

"Jannis Spyropoulos" exhibition at National Collection of Fine Arts, now known as the Smithsonian American Art Museum, September 18, 1969; Luncheon for Robert P. Multhauf, Senior Scientific Advisor at the National Museum of History and Technology, now known as the National Museum of American History, September 24, 1969.

"Kinds of Plants and Animals" Exhibit

Smithsonian Institution Archives
Updated as part of the Exhibits Modernization Program.

In Hall of Fossil Plants and Invertebrates at Museum of Natural History.

"Liberator" broadside advertising a bus trip to the 1963 March on Washington

National Museum of African American History and Culture
Blue print on yellowed paper. At center, a drawing of a bus. The text reads, "RIDE WITH THE LIBERATOR IN THE MARCH ON WASHINGTON WEDNESDAY AUGUST 28, 1963."

"Love Makes the World Go 'Round"

National Museum of American History
This sheet music is for the song “Love Makes the World Go ‘Round,” with words and music by Bob Merrill. It was published by Robbins Music Corporation in New York, New York in 1961. This song was featured in the 1961 Broadway musical Carnival! originally produced by David Merrick, with book by Michael Stewart and music and lyrics by Bob Merrill. Carnival! premiered an Broadway premiere at the Imperial Theatre on April 12, 1961 and starred Anna Maria Alberghetti, James Mitchell, Kaye Ballard, Pierre Olaf, and Jerry Orbach.

"Man and Beast: Comparative Social Behavior" Symposium

Smithsonian Institution Archives
Digital contact sheet available.

"Man and Beast: Comparative Social Behavior" symposium, with S. Dillon Ripley and Chief Justice Earl Warren, featuring a procession outside the National Museum of History and Technology, now known as the National Museum of American History.

"Man and Beast: Comparative Social Behavior" Symposium

Smithsonian Institution Archives
Digital contact sheet available.

"Man and Beast: Comparative Social Behavior" symposium, with S. Dillon Ripley, featuring a procession outside the National Museum of History and Technology, now known as the National Museum of American History.

"Memphis Underground"

National Museum of American History
This sheet music is for the song “Memphis Underground.” The song was composed and performed by Herbie Mann as a jazz flute solo, and published in 1969 by the Herbie Mann Music Corporation. The song belonged to an album of the same name.

"Midnight Cowboy"

National Museum of American History
This sheet music is for the song “Midnight Cowboy,” with music by John Barry. It was published by United Artists Music Company and Barwin Music, Inc. in New York, New York in 1969. This song was featured in the 1969 United Artists film Midnight Cowboy, directed by John Schlesinger and starred Dustin Hoffman and Jon Voight. There is an image of American duo pianists Ferrante & Teicher, who had a popular version of this song in 1970.

"Milton Avery" Painting Exhibition; Popular Culture Seminar

Smithsonian Institution Archives
Digital contact sheet available.

"Milton Avery" painting exhibition at the National Collection of Fine Arts (NCFA), now known as the Smithsonian American Art Museum, December 11, 1969; Popular culture seminar at the National Museum of History and Technology, now known as the National Museum of American History, December 16, 1969.

"Nature's History Book" Exhibit

Smithsonian Institution Archives
See also Record Unit 95, Box 44, Folder 12.

Updated as part of the Exhibits Modernization Program.

In Hall of Fossil Plants and Invertebrates at Museum of Natural History.

"Over the Rainbow"

National Museum of American History
“Someday I’ll wish upon a star/And wake up where the clouds are far/Behind me./Where troubles melt like lemon drops/Away above the chimney tops/That’s where you’ll find me.” E.Y.”Yip”Harbug’s hopeful lyrics made “Over the Rainbow” from the film The Wizard of Oz an instant favorite with 1939 audiences. The song, composed by Harold Arlen, quickly became a national standard and the signature ballad of the film’s star, Judy Garland (1922–1969).

"Pharmacy In Prints" Exhibition

Smithsonian Institution Archives
Digital contact sheet available.

"Pharmacy In Prints" exhibition at the National Museum of History and Technology, now known as the National Museum of American History, with Sami K. Hamarneh, Curator in the Division of Medical Sciences, and Robert P. Multhauf, MHT Director.

"Skulls of Eocene Mammals" Exhibit

Smithsonian Institution Archives
Updated as part of the Exhibits Modernization Program.

At Museum of Natural History.
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