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Found 8,450 Resources

The Road to Negro Liberation

National Museum of African American History and Culture
A pamphlet titled: [The Road To Negro Liberation]. The cover features red print on discolored paper. The title stretches throughout the center. Additional text reads: [Harry Haywood / 10¢ / Report to the Eighth Convention of the Communist Party of the U.S.A.]. There is also a hammer and sickle in the upper right edge. The interior contains sixty-three pages of text. The back cover features an advertisement for the Negro Liberator.

20 Dollars, United States, 1933

National Museum of American History
United States Mint, Philadelphia. Production of gold coinage was halted early in 1933 as the United States continued to move away from the gold standard. All double eagles struck in 1933 were not issued or authorized to be released to the public. Instead, they were supposed to be melted down and conveyed as bullion to Fort Knox. But all of the coins were not melted down. A handful were spirited away and kept in hiding for decades. One double eagle dated 1933 surfaced recently, and a complicated arrangement monetized it so that it could be sold at auction for millions of dollars.

This coin and another 1933 double eagle transferred from the U.S. Mint to the Smithsonian were the only legally owned with that date until recently.

The 1933 double eagle marks the end of the era in which the U.S. Congress authorized circulating gold coinage.

Acceptance Speeches: Communist Candidates in Presidential Elections

National Museum of African American History and Culture
A pamphlet featuring the 1936 candidates for the Communist Party. The cover has black print on yellowed paper. At center, there are two black and white photographs - one of Earl Browder, the other of James W. Ford. The interior consists of fifteen pages of text of speeches delivered by Browder and Ford. The back cover has an advertisement for Workers Library Publishers.

The Jobless Negro

National Museum of African American History and Culture
A pamphlet written by Elizabeth Lawson. The front cover of the pamphlet is black print on yellowed paper. Text at the top reads: [The Jobless Negro / by Elizabeth Lawson / Price 1¢]. Below the text is a black and white photograph of a man with his fist in the air. The pamphlet consists of sixteen pages of text, including the back cover. The back cover also contains publication information and a stamp for the Workers Book Shop.

Photographic print of Count Basie

National Museum of African American History and Culture
A black and white close up photograph of Count Basie seated at a piano. A woman wearing a fur coat and two men wearing suits are partially visible in the background. The back of the photograph has six stickers with barcode, numbers, reproduction information, caption information and a handwritten inscription of numbers.

Photographic print of Eroll Garner and unknown woman at a piano

National Museum of African American History and Culture
A black and white photograph of Erroll Garner and an unknown woman at a piano. Garner sits to the left of the photograph at the keys of the piano. The woman stands to the right of the photograph with her hands atop the piano. The front right corner has a handwritten inscription in black ink: [716]. The back of the photograph has caption information written by hand in pencil.

The Philadelphia Tribune Vol. 59, No. 34

National Museum of African American History and Culture
Pages 1 - 8 of the Philadelphia Tribune from August 7, 1943. The newspaper is folded in half. The headline at the top of the page reads "HOODLEMS WRECK $500,000 IN PROPERTY / Leaders Say Harlem Riot Set Group Back 20 Years."

20 Dollars, United States, 1933

National Museum of American History
United States Mint, Philadelphia. Production of gold coinage was halted early in 1933. All double eagles struck that years were not to be released to the public, but melted down and conveyed as bullion to Fort Knox. But all of the coins were not melted down: as seems inevitable under these circumstances, a handful was spirited away, kept in hiding for decades. One coin surfaced recently, and a complicated arrangement resulted in its being sold at auction for millions of dollars.

The two coins seen here are the only other 1933 double eagles legally held. They were transferred from the U.S. Mint to the Smithsonian Institution.

Negro Churchmen Speak to White Churchmen

National Museum of African American History and Culture
Pamphlet on understanding church teaching by the Federal Council of the Church of Christ in America's Commission on the Church and Minority Peoples. The white cover has black printed text on the left side which reads [Negro / Churchmen / Speak To / White / Churchmen]. There are sections about Christian faith, American democracy, and the post-war world. The booklet has fifteen (15) pages, with two (2) staples, and ends with a list of churchmen in support of the book. The back cover has distribution and price information. There is a mark on the front cover with the price of five (5) cents.

The Negro Worker Vol. 4 No. 2

National Museum of African American History and Culture
A pamphlet with black print on green paper. On the center of the front cover there is a black and white photograph of workers in a confrontation with a police officer with following caption, "Negro workers in struggle with police in U.S.A." The interior consists of thirty-two pages of text and photographs. The back cover features a drawing of a man breaking a chain over a globe.

Photographic print of Lionel Hampton and Bill Nunn

National Museum of African American History and Culture
A black and white photograph of Lionel Hampton standing to left of Bill Nunn Sr. Hampton's arm drapes around Nunn. Both men look directly at each other and smile. Hampton and Nunn stand in a darkened room; there is an upright piano and mic stand aligned with the left of the frame. The back of the photograph has a barcode sticker with a caption and a yellow circle sticker.

Photographic print of Bill "Bojangles" Robinson

National Museum of African American History and Culture
A black and white photograph of Bill "Bojangles" Robinson wearing long underwear and a brimmed hat while holding a striped cane. Robinson is standing in the entrance of a shower stall in a dressing room of the Stanley Theatre in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. The back of the photograph has barcoded sticker with caption information.

Southern Women Look at Lynching

National Museum of African American History and Culture
A pamphlet produced by the Association of Southern Women for the Prevention of Lynching. The soft cover consists of black printed text on a red background. The title [SOUTHERN WOMEN LOOK AT LYNCHING] is printed in large text at the top. There are 29 pages.

At the Old Ice-House

National Museum of African American History and Culture
A black-and-white photograph of two African American girls sitting on an unknown outdoor structure.

Photographic print of auto mechanic Sam "Scotty" Scott

National Museum of African American History and Culture
A black and white photograph of auto mechanic Sam "Scotty" Scott standing next to a car with an open hood. Scott is wearing a button-up shirt and backwards newsboy cap. He is looking at the camera and smiling. The back of the photograph is blank

This Child's Gonna Live

National Museum of African American History and Culture
A first edition of the novel, This Child's Gonna Live, by Sarah E. Wright.

The cover features a background image of a sepia toned portrait of Sarah E. Wright with off-white text. The book is 276 pages. The novel is set in a fishing village on Maryland's Eastern Shore during the Depression. It tells the story of an impoverished wife of an oysterman and her family.

Photographic print of a car crash

National Museum of African American History and Culture
A black and white photograph of a Buick, and another vehicle, at the front of an eight car collision. A crowd of men and young boys look on at the damaged vehicles in the middle of the street. In the background is a wall of storefronts, including Morris Pharmacy. The back of the photograph has various barcode stickers, captions, and inscriptions.

Photographic print of Ethel Waters in costume

National Museum of African American History and Culture
A black and white photograph of Ethel Waters backstage in costume for a performance in Pittsburgh. She wears a kerchief covering her hair, a long sleeved blouse, striped skirt, and checkered apron; her hands rest on her lap underneath the apron. Waters is seated in a corner in front of two walls lined with radiators. The back of the photograph has two barcode stickers, one with caption information, and a yellow circle sticker.

Photographic print of La Salle Beauty School

National Museum of African American History and Culture
A black and white photograph of La Salle Beauty School in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. The building has signs in the widows advertising the school. Two cars are parked outside on the street in front of the building. The bottom right corner has an inscription of a number: [719]. The back of the photograph has an inscription that identifies the building.

The Philadelphia Tribune Vol. 59, No. 34

National Museum of African American History and Culture
Pages 9 - 16 of the Philadelphia Tribune from August 7, 1943. The newspaper is folded in half. The headline at the top of the page reads "Fr. Soldiers Return To Martinique."

Medicine and Transportation

National Museum of African American History and Culture
This mural study includes depictions of various transportation and scientific industries. It is divided into two fields, an upper and a lower. The upper depicts examples of transportation technology, including a railroad engine, a propeller plane, a blimp, and a combustible engine. They are painted using broad streaks of color, contrasted with blocks of black and white. The lower field depicts a scene of science and technology, with African-American figures at work in a laboratory, a metal refinery, and a mine, set against a background of industrial scenes.

Letter to Margaret Martin Wallace ("Meg") from Josephine Baker

National Museum of African American History and Culture
A signed, typed letter from Josephine Baker to her sister Margaret Martin Wallace ("Meg"). The letter is written in French and was accompanied by a typed translation of the text.

The Negro Worker Vol.4 No. 4

National Museum of African American History and Culture
A pamphlet of black and red print on tan paper. On the center of the front cover there is a drawing of several world and national leaders labeled as warmongers. The interior consists of thirty-two pages of text and photographs. The back cover features a drawing of a man breaking a chain over a globe.

The Negro: His Future in America

National Museum of African American History and Culture
A special section of the October 18, 1943 issue of "The New Republic" titled "The Negro: His Future in America."
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