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Political advocate and textile artist Alexis Gumbs at the Closing Ceremony

Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage
Alexis Gumbs, a textile artist, political advocate, and presenter at the Will to Adorn program, reads a poem at the closing ceremonies of the 2013 Smithsonian Folklife Festival. The Will to Adorn program focused on the diversity of the African American community as seen through the lens of dress. Editing by Kylie Shryock and Alexander Jusdanis Videography by David Barnes and Documentation Volunteers [Catalog No. CFV10563; Copyright 2013 Smithsonian Institution]

Photograph of Lia Cook kneeling on Space Continuum I

Archives of American Art
1 photographic print : b&w ; 25 x 21 cm. Photograph of textile artist Lia Cook kneeling on her work Space Continuum I.
Inscription (handwritten) on label on verso: "Space Continuum I" 12' x 10' 1973 Wool/polyurethane foam

Photograph of Lia Cook with Space Continuum I

Archives of American Art
1 photographic print : col. ; 25 x 20 cm. Photograph of textile artist Lia Cook with her work Space Continuum I.

Textile

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
Yard goods; navy and black zig-zag bands on a splattered ground, a Soap 'n' Water design created by Associated American Artists, 1957.

Textile

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
Yard goods; overlapping blue and black spheres on a cream ground, a Soap 'n' Water design created by Associated American Artists, 1957.

Textile

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
Yard goods; large brown leaves on a black ground, a Soap 'n' Water design created by Associated American Artists, 1957.

Textile

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
Yard goods; blue polka dot stripes on a black ground, a Soap 'n' Water design created by Associated American Artists, 1957.

Textile

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
Yard goods; polished cotton, floral border design in deep turquoise, blue, violet, purple, emerald, and olive greens on a white ground, a Soap 'n' Water design created by Associated American Artists, 1957.

Textile

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
Yard goods; cotton border print, large anemones in shades of rose, blue, and lavender with green leaves on a black ground, a Soap 'n' Water design created by Associated American Artists, 1957.

Textile Design

National Museum of the American Indian

Textile Design

National Museum of the American Indian

Textile

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
Slightly more than one full repeat of a plate. Printed cotton on red. Landscape: two scenes, one an artist standing at an easel in front of a classical temple and dancers and a musician in front of a classical style pavillion.

Fabric too narrow for plate: Fabric lengths placed side-by-side repeat pattern straight across.

Textile

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
Ground shot with frisé silver or gold thread. Large-scale vertical repeat of conventionalized iris in black cut velvet. Ground color given by main silk warp. Black.

Textile

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
Ivory silk square with a block printed design in black showing an Eastern-style sailing canoe with two kneeling men, one with a spear. Fish leap in stylized waves around the boat. Corner spandrels each have two crossed fish. At the bottom of the circle: "Biddle 1923."

One complete panel and part of a second.

Textile

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
Cream-colored square with a block printed design in black showing a naked horseman spearing a wild boar that is surrounded by hunting dogs. In corners outside circle are horses and dogs. Design mostly reserved in color of the silk with black outlines and details. At the bottom of the circle: "Biddle 1923."

Textile

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
Broad vertical bands of velvet stripes in blue, black, dark pink, yellow, green and white with narrower satin bands in black.

Textile

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
Straight repeat of four narrative illustrations filling full width of fabric. The scenes refer to Diane de Poittiers and Henry II in the 16th century. Length of repeat: 92.5cm. (36 3/8").

Lengths of fabric would continue the pattern as a half drop.

Textile design:Tulips in black, white and blue

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum

Oral history interview with Glen Kaufman, 2008 January 22-February 23

Archives of American Art
Sound recording: 12 sound files (5 hr., 29 min.)

Transcript: 86 pages

Oral history interview with Glen Kaufman conducted 2008 January 22 and February 23 by Josephine Shea, for the Archives of American Art's Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America at Kaufman's home in Athens, Georgia.

Kaufman speaks of his childhood in Chicago; earning his B.A. in education in Wisconsin and meeting his wife; joining the ROTC and moving to Ohio; attending Cranbrook Academy of Art; living and studying in Denmark; traveling through Western Europe; working at the Liebes Studio in New York; teaching at Cranbrook for about 40 years; working in Japan; using metal leaf and wax in his art; moving from large to miniature textiles; his glove exhibition; visiting India; gallery exhibitions in Japan; the difference between university-trained artists and artisans; the impact of travel and international influences on his work; the art community in Kyoto; using Japanese dancers in his exhibitions; incorporating traditional Korean and Japanese materials and techniques into his work. Kaufman also recalls Charlene Page, Bill Thompson, Maija Grotell, Marianne Strengell, Dorothy Liebes, Jack Lenor Larsen, Meda Parker Johnston, Earl McCutchen, Ed Lambert, Mildred Constantine, Louise Allrich, Ed Rossbach, Camille Cook, and others.

Textile

National Museum of the American Indian

Textile

National Museum of the American Indian

Textile

National Museum of the American Indian

Textile

National Museum of the American Indian
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