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Found 39,203 Resources

× Sarcolexia Sea Foam

Smithsonian Gardens

× Sarcolexia Sea Foam

Smithsonian Gardens

× Sarcolexia Sea Foam

Smithsonian Gardens

p-type solar cell for terrestrial use

National Museum of American History
Solar cells come in many shapes and sizes, and are manufactured with a variety of materials. The wafer of this round cell is made with the element silicon and has an anti-reflection coating of titanium dioxide. The dark areas convert sunlight into electricity while the thick and thin lines are part of the electrical circuit. The two white, golf club-shaped parallel lines are the main circuit leads that gather the charge from the seventeen thin “fingers” that run horizontally across the wafer. This solar cell was designed for use on the ground rather than in space.

p-type multi-crystal solar cell for terrestrial use

National Museum of American History
Solar cells come in many shapes and sizes, and are manufactured with a variety of materials. The wafer of this round cell is made with the element silicon and has an anti-reflection coating of titanium dioxide. The dark areas convert sunlight into electricity while the thick and thin lines are part of the electrical circuit. The silver, crescent-shaped main lead runs along one edge and gathers the charge from fourteen thin “fingers” that run horizontally across the wafer. This solar cell was designed for use on the ground rather than in space.

p-type hexagonal solar cell for terrestrial use

National Museum of American History
Solar cells come in many shapes and sizes, and are manufactured with a variety of materials. The wafer of this hexagonal cell is made with the element silicon. The dark areas convert sunlight into electricity while the thick and thin lines are part of the electrical circuit. The white, tapered arrow along the center is the main lead and gathers the charge from twelve thin “fingers” that run horizontally across the wafer. This solar cell was designed for use on the ground rather than in space. The hexagonal shape allows many cells to be grouped together on a panel, minimizing wasted space between each cell.

microscope

National Museum of American History
This is a compound monocular with coarse and fine focus, double nosepiece, square stage, inclination joint with handle, sub-stage diaphragm, sub-stage mirror, and horseshoe base. The inscription reads “E. Leitz Wetzlar / No 24997.” The serial number indicates a date of around 1892. The back of the base is marked “48?” This was used at the Department of Terrestrial Magnetism of the Carnegie Institution of Washington. Ref: Ernst Leitz, Petrological and Metallographic Microscopes (Wetzlar, 1910), pp. 14-17.

lantern slide

National Museum of American History
Glass lantern slide depicting the relative lunar and terrestrial shadows at four points of the Earth’s orbit around the Sun. The rectangular wooden frame is incised “CARPENTER / & WESTLEY / 24 REGENT ST. / LONDON” on front, and “23” on one edge.

lantern slide

National Museum of American History
Glass lantern slide representing the relative lunar and terrestrial shadows at four point of the Earth’s orbit around the Sun. The rectangular wooden frame is incised “CARPENTER / & WESTLEY / 24 REGENT ST. / LONDON” on front, and “22” on one edge.

globe

National Museum of American History
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