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National Air and Space Museum Flight Simulator

Smithsonian Institution Archives
Featured in the "Torch," May 1978.

An aid instructs a visitor in the National Air and Space Museum (NASM) General Aviation Trainer (GAT-1) flight simulator in the General Aviation Gallery.

Explore Smithsonian: How Are Optical Instruments Tested Before Space Flight?

SI Center for Learning and Digital Access
Telescopes have mirrors that help them gather light, but the challenge of modern telescopes is getting the mirrors to bend and move to collect the most light. Discover how Smithsonian researchers are making their own mirrors, and testing them, to go into space.

The Psychology of Long-Term Space Flight: Music, Art, and Creature Comforts - STEM in 30

National Air and Space Museum
If you've ever taken a long trip, you know that bringing your favorite things along will help get you through the journey. The same goes for astronauts in space. Music and the arts entertain them and give them a chance to break away from their demanding schedules. In this episode of STEM in 30, we'll dive into how music, art, and creature comforts helps astronauts cope with long-term space travel. This program is made possible through the generous support of NASA. More: airandspace.si.edu/stem-30

NASM Flight Simulator

Smithsonian Archives - History Div
Featured in TORCH, May 1978

Trying out the National Air and Space Museum flight simulator in the General Aviation Gallery.

Launching the Space Race

National Air and Space Museum
The Soviet Union launched Sputnik in 1957, proving that they mastered WWII rocket technology. Sputnik spurred the U.S. to develop rocket, space flight, and navigation technology to rival the Soviet Union.

Stowage Bag, Official Flight Kit, Space Shuttle

National Air and Space Museum
This Official Flight Kit stowage bag was created for NASA's human spaceflight program. It was flown on a space shuttle mission.

NASA transferred the stowage bag to the Museum in 2017.

Space Junk

National Air and Space Museum

Space is a mess. At this moment, there are literally thousands of human-made objects cluttering up Earth orbit. There's the big stuff you would expect, like satellites. But, when two of these large objects collide, they can create millions of tiny orbiting pieces. And all of these little particles can cause big problems.

This episode is all about orbital debris, a.k.a. space junk – where it comes from, how we’re trying to solve the debris problem, and what happens when it comes back to Earth. We’ll talk with Donald Kessler, the former NASA scientist who first modeled the dangers of space junk, and historian Lisa Rand, who shares the creative ideas on how to clean it up (think – lasers… and gecko feet).

 

Interior Views of National Air and Space Museum Exhibits, "Flight Uniforms"

Smithsonian Institution Archives
Requested from Office of Printing and Photographic Services (OPPS) by National Air and Space Museum.

Germs in Space

National Air and Space Museum
When Space X launched the Dragon Spacecraft on Friday, April 18, it was carrying nearly 5,000 pounds of supplies and payloads, including critical materials to support more than 150 science investigations planned for International Space Station (ISS) Expeditions 39 and 40.  Among these materials are some that weigh hardly anything at all—microbes—of which one type   ...Continue Reading

Explore Smithsonian: How Can Electricity Correct a Telescope in Outer Space?

SI Center for Learning and Digital Access
Learn how scientist at Smithsonian Astrophysical Society are using electricity to correct mirrors on telescopes in outer space!

"Milestones of Flight Gallery" in National Air and Space Museum

Smithsonian Archives - History Div
Featured in TORCH, February 1977

The "Milestones of Flight Gallery" draws a large crowd of visitors in the newly opened National Air and Space Museum. This photograph was taken December 28, 1976.

Double the Space Budget?

National Air and Space Museum

The Flight of the Dragon

National Air and Space Museum

Medal, NASA Space Flight, Sally Ride

National Air and Space Museum
This set of items constitute the NASA Space Flight Medal awarded to Dr. Sally K. Ride after her first space flight aboard STS-7 in 1983. The medal is bestowed upon all space flight crew members after the completion of a mission.

Sally Ride became the first American woman in space when she flew aboard STS-7 in 1983. Her second and last space mission was STS-41G in 1984. A physicist with a Ph.D., she joined the astronaut corps in 1978 as a part of the first class of astronauts recruited specifically for the Space Shuttle Program. Viewed as a leader in the NASA community, she served on the Rogers Commission after the Challenger disaster in 1986 as well as the Columbia Accident Investigation Board (CAIB) in 2003. She also led the task force that produced a visionary strategic planning report in 1987 titled, “NASA Leadership and America’s Future in Space,” but known popularly as the Ride Report.

After she retired from NASA in 1987, Dr. Ride taught first at Stanford and later at the University of California, San Diego. Until her death in 2012, she was president and CEO of Sally Ride Science, a company that promoted science education.

Dr. Ride’s partner, Dr. Tam O’Shaughnessy, donated the medals and accompanying items to the Museum in 2013.

Ask an Expert: Preparations for the First Human Space Flight

National Air and Space Museum
Dr. Cathleen Lewis, curator in the Space History Division at the National Air and Space Museum, discusses the preparation to launch the first humans into space. This informal gallery talk was recorded on December 1, 2010 as part of the National Air and Space Museum's "Ask an Expert" lecture series. Ask an Expert" lectures are presented weekly at the National Air and Space Museum in Washington, DC and biweekly at the Udvar-Hazy Center in Chantilly, VA. For more information & schedule, see http://www.nasm.si.edu/askanexpert/

Leonardo's Flight

National Air and Space Museum
Video prepared for the exhibition, Leonardo da Vinci's Codex on the Flight of Birds, at the Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum, September 13-October 22, 2013. The video describes the content and history of this historically prescient Leonardo da Vinci notebook about flight. Video Credit: Courtesy of Silvia Rosa Brusin, RAI Radiotelevisione Italiana

Aerobatic Flight

National Air and Space Museum
Veteran cinematographer Mark Magin has shot thousands of hours of air show film and files, which he culled into this exciting piece. Archival film rounded out the history, highlighting some of the aerobatic planes at the Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center and the extraordinary pilots who flew them. http://airandspace.si.edu/exhibitions/aerobatic/

The First Transpacific Passenger Flight

National Air and Space Museum
Passed over S.F. Bay Bridge, along Embarcadero, Marina, Presidio, etc. Just after passing over Golden Gate Bridge encountered low cumulus clouds on the coast. “On top” from there on over “snowy desert.” Later clear & broken—smooth air. Early morning, “detoured” to south to avoid several storm areas. Arrived Honolulu (Pearl City) after passing over “Diamond   ...Continue Reading

First Flight?

National Air and Space Museum
December 17, 2013, marked the 110th anniversary of the first powered, controlled flight of an airplane. Wilbur Wright had made the first attempt three days before, when the brothers laid their 60 foot launch rail down the lower slope of the Kill Devil Hill. That attempt ended with a hard landing only 105 feet from   ...Continue Reading

‘Tis the Season for a Reason

SI Center for Learning and Digital Access
‘Tis the Season for a Reason — investigates common student difficulties in understanding the cause of the seasons as well as common pitfalls and helpful approaches. 

Hands and Gloves in Space

National Air and Space Museum
There is a common saying that the hands are where the mind meets the world. In space there is no direct contact between the mind and the world. This transaction is mediated by the artificial structures called gloves. I came to realize the extent of this interference most profoundly several weeks ago when I saw   ...Continue Reading

A Surprise Call From Space

National Air and Space Museum

It’s not a typical afternoon at work when you answer the phone and hear, “Hey, Dr. Neal. It’s Kjell Lindgren calling from the International Space Station.” Thus began a 15-minute surprise call from the ISS Expedition 44-45 NASA astronaut. Lindgren just wanted to say that he had with him the Museum flag and Gemini IV patch   ...Continue Reading

The post A Surprise Call From Space appeared first on AirSpace.

A Rationale for Cislunar Space

National Air and Space Museum
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