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Found 31,633 Resources

"AJ"

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
Simple flat one-piece form of shaped blade tapering to curved point at end of handle; matte finish.

"American Beauty" Iron

National Museum of American History
Model 79AB, 1000W, 110-120V (AC only) clothes or laundry iron for domestic use. Chrome-plated, streamlined body has a forward-leaning, black Bakelite handle with red Lucite grip; handle front is set back from the pointed toe, while spurred back doubles as a heel rest. Thermostat control (fabric selector dial) and encased thermometer are below handle; both black with white markings. Brown, red, and yellow cloth-covered cord with 2-prong, bell-shape, brown plastic plug attached at back right of handle; black rubber tubing at attachment. No box.

Thermometer and handle back both marked "American / Beauty." Identification plate on heel underside stamped: "AMERICAN BEAUTY / CA. NO. 79AB. VOLTS 110-120 WATTS1000 / A.C. ONLY / AMERICAN ELECTRICAL HEATER CO. / DETROIT, U.S.A. / PAT. NO’S. / DES.121163 / ” 121164 / RE.22048 / 1916671 / PAT. NO’S. / 2256147 / 2270316 / 2300230 / 2328152 / TO REMOVE / CONTROL LEVER OR TERM. BOX COVER / PRY OFF / 8412".

U.S. Design Patents:

- 121163, June 25, 1940, Frank Kuhn, Grosse Pointe Farms, and Laurence H. Thomas, assignors to American Electrical Heater Company, Detroit, Michigan, for “a laundry iron”

- 121164, June 25, 1940, Frank Kuhn, Grosse Pointe Farms, and Laurence H. Thomas, assignors to American Electrical Heater Company, Detroit, Michigan, for “a handle for laundry iron or the like”

- RE.22048, March 10, 1942, Frank Kuhn, Grosse Pointe Farms, and Laurence H. Thomas, assignors to American Electrical Heater Company, Detroit, Michigan, for “Electric iron”

U.S. Mechanical Patents:

- 1916671, July 4, 1933, Charles A. Hanser, Erwin A. Lockwood, assignors to American Electrical Heater Company, Detroit, Michigan, for “Thermostat”

- 2256147, Sept. 16, 1941, Frank Kuhn, Grosse Pointe Farms, and Laurence H. Thomas, assignors to American Electrical Heater Company, Detroit, Michigan, for “Handle”

- 2270316, Jan. 20, 1942, Frank Kuhn, Grosse Pointe Farms, and Laurence H. Thomas, assignors to American Electrical Heater Company, Detroit, Michigan, for "finish for working of laundry irons and the like" (sole plate)

- 2300230, Oct. 27, 1942, Frank Kuhn and Laurence H. Thomas, assignors to American Electrical Heater Company, Detroit, Michigan, for “Thermometer unit for electric irons”

- 2328152, Aug. 31, 1943, Frank Kuhn and Laurence H. Thomas, assignors to American Electrical Heater Company, Detroit, Michigan, for "Thermostatic unit and connections for electric irons"

Date made per phone conversation with manufacturer (in 1988).

"Assyrian Head" pattern

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
Handle with scrolled foliate ornament and antique style crowned female mask at tip; spade-shaped blade with scrolled foliate decoration, partially fluted.

"BLUE DOG" Shark

Smithsonian American Art Museum

"Balustrades des Orchestres du Grand Carre aux champs-Elysees (1833)"

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
Design for two different red-bordered square panels. Right: Dark green square with a diamond-shaped white insert, decorated with a blue arabesque design. Left: Dark purple square with an octagonal white insert, decorated with a blue arabesque design.

"Be Cast"

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
Case for picnic cutlery 1999-53-21/25. Black rectangular shape with curved corners; the hinged lid, with raised lozenge-shaped section at left and "BE CAST US" logo on upper right, opens to reveal cutlery fitted in sectioned base; each section labled with the name of the corresponding piece: from left to right: spoon, fork, knife, pick, pick.

"Be Cast"

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
Lozenge shaped polished steel knife (a), the blade with curved bottom edge coming to pointed tip; "BE CAST" on handle; cover (b) of clear matte-textured plastic fits over blade. Part of six-piece picnic set.

"Be Cast"

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
Lozenge shaped polished steel form with oval bowl and "BE CAST" on handle. Part of six-piece picnic set.

"Be Cast"

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
Lozenge-shaped polished steel form with three upturned tines and "BE CAST" on handle. Part of six-piece picnic set.

"Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks"

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
Oblong, in the shape of an Elk's tooth, featuring a blue enameled clock dial with Roman numerals and set at 11:00, beneath which is a raised image of an elk's head, above the clock are the letters B.P.O.E., an acronym for the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks. No decoration on reverse. Lid hinged on upper left. Striker on the reverse side of lid.

"Biram's Patent" Anemometer

National Museum of American History
Portable, single-dial, eight-vane, mechanical anemometer with carrying or hanging loop at top. Device consists of a circular brass band with exterior frame around its vertical middle that holds a central shaft in place that is turned by the spatulate-shaped vanes and connected to a small circular dial, marked 1 to 9 with "X" at zero place, at center front of frame. Top front crossbar of frame engraved "Biram's Patent" while bottom front crossbar has "Davis & Son", "647" and "A" (sideways), all in roman letters.

The anemometer measures wind velocity in order to determine the volume of air entering or exiting mine shafts. It was invented in 1844 by Benjamin Biram (1804-1857), house steward to the Earl Fitzwilliam, who owned several coal mines in South Yorkshire, England. Scientific instrument maker John Davis (1810-1873) of Derby, England, first manufactured the device in 1845; and anemometers based on Biram's patent continued to be produced by the successor firms of John Davis & Son and Davis Derby until the mid 20th century.

"Blue Book" Mallinson's American Indian Series

National Museum of American History
Booklet produced by H. R. Mallinson & Co., Inc., New York. Subject is a line of silk fabrics based on Native American symbolism and lore from 1927-28. 20 leaves, 40 pages, including front and back covers. Front cover is a bust of a Native American Chief in feathered headdress (Sioux War Bonnet). Top of the entire booklet is cut following the shape of the headdress.

"Candelabre du Pavillon Orchestre place dans le bassin des Tuileries en 1834"

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
Design for a candelabrum surmounted by a t-shaped superstructure, which is topped with a red polyhedron lantern and two smaller blue lanterns suspended from the perpendicular arm of the superstructure. Below this is the yellow, fluted and cinched columnar body of the candelabrum, which rests on a tall base articulated with abstracted vegetal ornaments in gold, black and blue, which in turn rests on a blue plinth with light blue and red circular ornaments. The candelabrum is nearly identical to those represented in Blouet's drawing of a music pavilion, 1991-17-7.

"Cast as white by default": Exploring the lack of diversity in movies

National Museum of American History

What if you watched only the lines in E.T. or the entire Harry Potter series that were spoken by people of color? You might realize two things: First, it doesn't take long. Second, it leaves you with questions. I interviewed Venezuelan American actor Dylan Marron, creator of the Every Single Word project, as part of my research for the upcoming History Film Forum.

Dylan, tell us a little about your Every Single Word project. What inspired you to do this project? How did you decide what films to use?

I created Every Single Word from two vantage points: film lover and actor. I've long been aware of the dearth of diversity in mainstream American films as a viewer, but it was only recently that I've come to feel the consequences of it from the inside. Casting calls that I would not be "right" for, roles that would call for me to "play up" my ethnicity, and agents who would compliment my work but then tell me that they weren't sure how much work there would be for my "type." I became well acquainted with the euphemisms employed to tell me I wasn't white enough to regularly get work.

I wanted to express this in a way that presented facts, not feelings. I figured if I presented the truth without comment that it would present a question rather than a statement. This is how many people of color speak in mainstream films. How does this sit with you?

I choose films that tell universal stories that are not about race whose protagonists could have been any color, but were cast as white by default.

Black-and-white portrait of woman with headwrap and stern or determined expression

I've noticed that you have an image of Scarlett O'Hara and Mammy, (characters from Gone with the Wind) as a background to your Every Single Word blog. What significance does that film hold for you? What are your views on the representation of people of color in that film?

In my mind Hattie McDaniel (the actor who played Mammy in Gone with the Wind) is the posterwoman for Every Single Word. Yes, she had a large supporting role in the most popular film in history. Yes, she won an Oscar for it. But what kind of role? Mammy was Scarlett O'Hara's dutiful servant, a house slave tending to her selfish white master in the context of a war that was fighting for her freedom. From a storytelling perspective that is a fascinating character who could easily be the protagonist of her own four-hour epic film. But she isn't, she's a one-note character (played beautifully by McDaniel with what she was given) that has little to no agency to change or affect the story of the film.

We still see the Mammy archetype today. Maids, servants, slaves—humans stripped of their agency whose characters don't have an arc. But why can people of color still only play characters written to be of color? Why are roles that are written to tell a colorless story automatically cast as white?

Recently you've been looking into historically based films. Do you see a contrast in these types of films? How do you think the lack of diversity in historical films shapes America's collective memory and American culture?

As we're seeing right now in the Texas textbook debate, history is just as much about the person teaching that history as it is about the history they're teaching. If only straight white dudes are controlling how history is told in film, then that's the only perspective we're going to get.

Dylan Marron's playlist includes scenes from Cimarron (1931) and other movies of the past, most of which feature very little dialogue by people of color

In many historical movies, specifically in war films, women are often absent from those narratives. Would you ever consider focusing your project on another group, such as women?

The lack of women in film is also a huge problem, specifically the absence of women with agency. For now, Every Single Word will be about race but I encourage all moviegoers to question not only the quantity but the content of the words any minority is allowed to speak in pop storytelling.

Why do you believe there is still this profound lack of diversity in Hollywood films?

The problems here are largely structural. It's all about who has the power and who has access to the means of production. If one group is still controlling the money in Hollywood, then they're also going to influence what stories Hollywood tells. We craft stories in our own image.

What historical films would you want to do Every Single Word to in the future?

I think Lawrence of Arabia will be interesting.

Black-and-white photo of a theater and surrounding buildings

Lastly, Dylan, what are you looking to accomplish with this project? Do you believe that your project will circulate enough awareness through mainstream America about the lack of diversity in films?

All I want to do is to present facts and ask questions. That's what I hope Every Single Word will do. Who is crafting universal stories? And which people get to be avatars for those universal stories? I am only one voice asking these questions but I'm also part of a loud and strong chorus.

The Smithsonian and partners at the National Endowment for the Humanities present the History Film Forum, a four-day exploration of history on the screen, November 19-22, 2015. Three events in particular that might interest you: Discussion: Diversity in History Film, Screening: Uniquely Nasty: The U.S. Government's War on Gays, and Discussion: The Free State of Jones

Posted Date: 
Tuesday, November 17, 2015 - 11:15

Categories:

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"Centilitre" Measure

National Museum of American History
Lidless, bracket-handled, cylindrical metric measure with a spouted, sloped collar and molded base; incised around collar and bottom of body. Stamped on front of body "CENTILITRE" in incuse serif letters below a small clasped hands in a circle and "199"; on face of handle with another small clasped hands; and along top of inside rim with an indiscernible number of small raised letters. Flat bottom struck once with touchmark "VC" in a lozenge or diamond shape. One of an assembled set of eight metric measures, DL*67.0326-.0333.

"Chelsea Bird" Jar with Cover

National Museum of American History
Covered ginger jar shape with high shoulders tapering to moderate base. Cover is a flattened dome shape. The glass was blown and cased with colorless and amethyst layers. The outer amethyst colored layer was cut and carved away into designs featuring birds, insects, and flora of twigs and grass known as "Chelsea Bird" pattern. Large rectangular panel of crosshatch diamond pattern.

"Chilum" (Hookah Part)

NMNH - Anthropology Dept.
OVERALL SHAPE CYLINDRICAL, BOWL-SHAPED CENTER TAPERED INWARD TO FLARED HOLLOW BASE, STEPPED UPWARD ALONGSHAFT TO FLARED RIM, WAVES, RINGS, STRIPE, AND BANDS IN ZONED BLACK AND BUFF PAINT. BROKEN AT BASE OF SHAFT.

"Chocolate is a Fighting Food!" – Chocolate bars in the Second World War

National Museum of American History

"Do you like chocolate?" That's one of the first questions I ask museum visitors during a chocolate program I lead in the museum's Wallace H. Coulter Performance Plaza. Nearly every time, the response is unanimous: "Of course!" Most of us don't see chocolate as more than a delicious (and often addictive) candy we love to eat, especially around Halloween and Valentine’s Day. Many people are surprised, then, when I show them how chocolate has had many other uses besides being a confection.

Our interactive program on chocolate history, The Business of Chocolate: From Bean to Drink, helps visitors understand how people made chocolate in the 18th century as well as chocolate's historical roles in American business and society. In particular, I love talking with visitors about chocolate's use in military rations, both because it's a story I first heard from my grandfather and because it's a topic I was able to research during my internship.

My grandfather, Harlan Thomas Kennedy, a veteran of World War II, used to share memories of eating chocolate on the battlefront. Growing up in a poor mining family in western Kentucky during the Great Depression, my grandfather hardly had much chocolate until his time in the army. While in the 82nd Airborne Division fighting in Belgium and the Netherlands during Operation Market Garden, he received field rations, a most spartan variant being the K-ration. These rations each included a chocolate bar!

K-ration; original outer green color cardboard box contains: waxed cardboard box shell with “CHESTERFIELD” cigarette pack, toilet paper packet, one stick of gum, and eight biscuits, confectionery chocolate D bar, bouillon powder packet, can of pork loaf; manufactured by the Kellogg Company; World War II era.

Black-and-white pocket-sized portrait photo of Harlan Thomas Kennedy (1924-2013), of Ohio County, Kentucky, in army uniform, around 1943.

My grandfather's fondness for the rationed chocolate bars was so great that he would even trade cigarettes for more chocolate. These chocolate bars certainly served as a morale boost when on the front, where resources had to be limited.

Of all foods, why chocolate? Because of its caffeine and high calorie content, it was a reliable source of energy for soldiers on the front. Chocolate consumption among Americans dates back to colonial times—George Washington and the Continental Army during the Revolutionary War would have consumed chocolate as a hot beverage, for example. By World War II chocolate had become a staple of military rations.

In fact, the U.S. War Department collaborated with chocolate manufacturers to produce Ration D bars, especially suitable for extreme temperatures sometimes encountered on the front. A mixture of chocolate, sugar, powdered milk, oat flour, and vitamins provided 600 calories per serving and made a very effective survival food.

Box for U.S. Army Field Ration D ("with Thiamine Hydrochloride, Twelve 4 Ounce Cakes, Prepared by Hershey Chocolate Corporation, Hershey, PA, January 1942").

Brown, yellow, and blue wrapped “Hershey’s Tropical Chocolate” bar. Small print on the top reads, “REG. U.S. PAT. OFF”. Small print on the side of bar reads, “MANUFACTURED BY HERSHEY CHOCOLATE CORPORATION, HERSHEY, PA.” The top left corner of the wrapper is torn, revealing the inner foil wrapping.

It surprises me that my grandpa enjoyed the bars so much, as they were designed more for sustenance than for taste. They were to be eaten slowly to supply maximum energy. The Ration D bars were intended to "taste a little better than a boiled potato," according to U.S. Army Quartermaster Paul Logan in a 1937 correspondence with Hershey's, and many other soldiers apparently disliked the bar since it was mostly bitter and extremely dense. I suppose if the bars were too tasty, they would've been eaten too quickly!

Due to the amount of chocolate the War Department and the Red Cross sent to soldiers abroad, chocolate on the home front was very limited. Many magazine advertisements asked civilians for wartime cooperation and understanding, as chocolate became an integral part in the war effort. Could you imagine if chocolate were rationed today?

This October 9, 1944, advertisement for Whitman’s chocolate boxes shows a woman embracing a soldier in uniform kissing her cheek. On the bottom right is a box of Whitman’s Chocolate Sampler. The bold font reads, “A WOMAN NEVER FORGETS THE MAN WHO REMEMBERS,” and, “BUY MORE WAR BONDS.” In fine print below the box of chocolates reads, “If you can’t always get your favorite Sampler, remember it’s because millions of pounds of Whitman’s Chocolates are going to all our fighting fronts.”

As with many other products, chocolate's wartime production helped it develop into a mass consumer food in the decades after the war. If you are interested in learning more about chocolate's military legacy, you should check out the M&M's story, currently on display in the American Enterprise exhibition. M&M's were first introduced to World War II soldiers as a sugar-coated chocolate candy that didn't melt in your hands.

1940s cellophane wrapper for M&M’s candy. The wrapper is shaped in a cylinder and flattened. White font on a red circular background says “Greetings from the American Red Cross,” flanked by two candles. The wrapper also says “Candy Coated Chocolate, mmm Delicious mmm.”

Listening to my grandfather's wartime memories of chocolate helped me realize how small things in our lives connect to bigger movements, ideas, and events. Have you talked with your family members or friends about the role of special foods like chocolate in their lives?

Sean Jacobson completed an internship in the Department of Visitor Services. He is a recent graduate of Western Kentucky University, where he majored in History and Broadcasting. The Business of Chocolate: From Bean to Drink is a free daytime program. Check our calendar for upcoming dates.

Author(s): 
intern Sean Jacobson
Posted Date: 
Monday, October 24, 2016 - 08:00
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"Chocolate is a Fighting Food!" – Chocolate bars in the Second World War

National Museum of American History

"Do you like chocolate?" That's one of the first questions I ask museum visitors during a chocolate program I lead in the museum's Wallace H. Coulter Performance Plaza. Nearly every time, the response is unanimous: "Of course!" Most of us don't see chocolate as more than a delicious (and often addictive) candy we love to eat, especially around Halloween and Valentine’s Day. Many people are surprised, then, when I show them how chocolate has had many other uses besides being a confection.

Our interactive program on chocolate history, The Business of Chocolate: From Bean to Drink, helps visitors understand how people made chocolate in the 18th century as well as chocolate's historical roles in American business and society. In particular, I love talking with visitors about chocolate's use in military rations, both because it's a story I first heard from my grandfather and because it's a topic I was able to research during my internship.

My grandfather, Harlan Thomas Kennedy, a veteran of World War II, used to share memories of eating chocolate on the battlefront. Growing up in a poor mining family in western Kentucky during the Great Depression, my grandfather hardly had much chocolate until his time in the army. While in the 82nd Airborne Division fighting in Belgium and the Netherlands during Operation Market Garden, he received field rations, a most spartan variant being the K-ration. These rations each included a chocolate bar!

K-ration; original outer green color cardboard box contains: waxed cardboard box shell with “CHESTERFIELD” cigarette pack, toilet paper packet, one stick of gum, and eight biscuits, confectionery chocolate D bar, bouillon powder packet, can of pork loaf; manufactured by the Kellogg Company; World War II era.

Black-and-white pocket-sized portrait photo of Harlan Thomas Kennedy (1924-2013), of Ohio County, Kentucky, in army uniform, around 1943.

My grandfather's fondness for the rationed chocolate bars was so great that he would even trade cigarettes for more chocolate. These chocolate bars certainly served as a morale boost when on the front, where resources had to be limited.

Of all foods, why chocolate? Because of its caffeine and high calorie content, it was a reliable source of energy for soldiers on the front. Chocolate consumption among Americans dates back to colonial times—George Washington and the Continental Army during the Revolutionary War would have consumed chocolate as a hot beverage, for example. By World War II chocolate had become a staple of military rations.

In fact, the U.S. War Department collaborated with chocolate manufacturers to produce Ration D bars, especially suitable for extreme temperatures sometimes encountered on the front. A mixture of chocolate, sugar, powdered milk, oat flour, and vitamins provided 600 calories per serving and made a very effective survival food.

Box for U.S. Army Field Ration D ("with Thiamine Hydrochloride, Twelve 4 Ounce Cakes, Prepared by Hershey Chocolate Corporation, Hershey, PA, January 1942").

Brown, yellow, and blue wrapped “Hershey’s Tropical Chocolate” bar. Small print on the top reads, “REG. U.S. PAT. OFF”. Small print on the side of bar reads, “MANUFACTURED BY HERSHEY CHOCOLATE CORPORATION, HERSHEY, PA.” The top left corner of the wrapper is torn, revealing the inner foil wrapping.

It surprises me that my grandpa enjoyed the bars so much, as they were designed more for sustenance than for taste. They were to be eaten slowly to supply maximum energy. The Ration D bars were intended to "taste a little better than a boiled potato," according to U.S. Army Quartermaster Paul Logan in a 1937 correspondence with Hershey's, and many other soldiers apparently disliked the bar since it was mostly bitter and extremely dense. I suppose if the bars were too tasty, they would've been eaten too quickly!

Due to the amount of chocolate the War Department and the Red Cross sent to soldiers abroad, chocolate on the home front was very limited. Many magazine advertisements asked civilians for wartime cooperation and understanding, as chocolate became an integral part in the war effort. Could you imagine if chocolate were rationed today?

This October 9, 1944, advertisement for Whitman’s chocolate boxes shows a woman embracing a soldier in uniform kissing her cheek. On the bottom right is a box of Whitman’s Chocolate Sampler. The bold font reads, “A WOMAN NEVER FORGETS THE MAN WHO REMEMBERS,” and, “BUY MORE WAR BONDS.” In fine print below the box of chocolates reads, “If you can’t always get your favorite Sampler, remember it’s because millions of pounds of Whitman’s Chocolates are going to all our fighting fronts.”

As with many other products, chocolate's wartime production helped it develop into a mass consumer food in the decades after the war. If you are interested in learning more about chocolate's military legacy, you should check out the M&M's story, currently on display in the American Enterprise exhibition. M&M's were first introduced to World War II soldiers as a sugar-coated chocolate candy that didn't melt in your hands.

1940s cellophane wrapper for M&M’s candy. The wrapper is shaped in a cylinder and flattened. White font on a red circular background says “Greetings from the American Red Cross,” flanked by two candles. The wrapper also says “Candy Coated Chocolate, mmm Delicious mmm.”

Listening to my grandfather's wartime memories of chocolate helped me realize how small things in our lives connect to bigger movements, ideas, and events. Have you talked with your family members or friends about the role of special foods like chocolate in their lives?

Sean Jacobson completed an internship in the Department of Visitor Services. He is a recent graduate of Western Kentucky University, where he majored in History and Broadcasting. The Business of Chocolate: From Bean to Drink is a free daytime program. Check our calendar for upcoming dates.

Author(s): 
intern Sean Jacobson
Posted Date: 
Monday, October 24, 2016 - 08:00
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"Colonnes d partmentales,fetes Juillet 1838"

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
Design for a polyhedron column with thin red stripes articulating the upper portion and geometric designs in red and blue articulating the lower portion. Affixed to the front of the column, three-fourths of the way up, is a large golden circle with a red and blue border, which is surmounted by an eagle. The whole structure is surmounted by a green, rounded urn shaped form and rests upon a two part base, the upper portion with yellow vertical panels with geometric inserts of red and green and the lower portion in solid red.

"Conch Shell Fgts Shaped For Beads.

NMNH - Anthropology Dept.

"Costers [sic.] in Cork" for Armstrong Co.

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
Four designs for coasters in cork, including plan and profile.

Upper left #5, hexagonal shaped, lined pattern

Upper right #7, square shaped, geometric pattern

Lower left #6, round shaped, flower-like pattern

Lower right #8, oval shaped, 5 ball pattern

Three logos of the Armstrong Company

"Decilitre" Measure

National Museum of American History
Bracket-handled, cylindrical metric measure with molded rim and base, hooked rectangular thumb piece, and flat extension burnt to the rimless domed lid. Both ends of hinge pin flattened. Lid inside with two pairs of raised concentric circles. Stamped on front of body "DECILITRE" in incuse serif letters flanked by illegible shapes; and on front outside of rim, face of handle and top of lid with clasped hands in an oval. Touchmark erased from underside of flat bottom. One of an assembled set of five metric measures, DL*67.0321-.0325.

"Demi Decilitre" Measure

National Museum of American History
Lidless, bracket-handled, cylindrical metric measure with a spouted, sloped collar and molded base; incised around collar and above base. Stamped on front of body "DEMI / DEC[ILITRE]" in incuse serif letters; on front of neck with a small imperial crown and four small letters; on face of handle with another small imperial crown above "199" sideways; to right of handle with three raised letters in circles; and along top of inside rim and top of handle with an indiscernible number of small letters. Flat bottom struck once with touchmark "GV" in a lozenge or diamond shape. One of an assembled set of eight metric measures, DL*67.0326-.0333.
1-24 of 31,633 Resources