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Found 223 Collections

 

Planetary Topography

Students get an introduction to the concept of topography and how topographic data are displayed with graduated colors. Students practice visualizing and translating map-view data into side-view topographic profiles of various features. Then, with this background, students examine real topographic data from four planetary bodies in the solar system and interpret this data to answer questions about each planetary body. 

Students will:
  • Understand that topography is a 2D representation of a 3D feature, the elevation of a surface.
  • Read and analyze topography data to find what’s high and low in elevation.
  • Visualize the shape of a land form or feature based on its topography.
  • Interpret real planetary topography data to answer questions.
  • Explain how topography data is useful, both on Earth and other planets.

Keywords: #airandspace, National Air and Space Museum, NASM, topography, maps, Mars, Venus, Earth, Moon

National Air and Space Museum Smithsonian
18
 

Tornadoes

This collection looks at tornadoes, how they form, how they are measured, and includes a hands-on activity and a design challenge.

Students will:
  • Understand the properties of tornadoes.
  • Understand how tornadoes form a funnel-shaped mass of air.
  • Understand that engineers design and build structures to withstand tornado damage.

Keywords: #airandspace, National Air and Space Museum, NASM, natural disaster, planning, 

National Air and Space Museum Smithsonian
15
 

Fly Girls: Women in Aerospace

From the time the airplane first took to the air women have played an important role in shaping the aerospace industry. Join STEM in 30 and the first private space explorer, Anousheh Ansari as we take a look at the contributions of early women aviators, female astronauts and other pioneering women.

National Air and Space Museum
16
 

WWI: How History Shaped Technology

98 years ago this week, the United States entered World War I. The Wright brothers had only taken to the sky 14 years before, but airplanes still played a vital role in the war effort. Because of the events of WWI, airplane technology developed at an incredible rate. This fast-paced webcast will look at how airplanes changed in this short timeframe, how other technology advanced, and how airplanes were used throughout WWI.

April 8, 2015

National Air and Space Museum
18
 

Modular Designs

Observe and discuss selected images. . . 

  • What shapes or forms are combined in each image?
  • What purpose do you think it was designed for? Why do you think that?
  • What do all the images have in common?

After discussion, construct a definition of the term "modular."

ART MAKING CHALLENGES: 

  • Create a modular sculpture for a community space using cut and folded paper or tag board.
  • Draw a modular design for a building with a specific purpose.
  • Design modular storage for a small apartment. 
  • Design modular furniture that could be rearranged for different purposes. 

Jean-Marie Galing
15
 

Fabulous Fabrics

Use images to introduce a stamp-printing lesson with primary students. Observe selected images and discuss. . . 

  • What shapes or lines do you see?
  • Which fabrics have repeat patterns?
  • Which fabrics have alternating patterns?
  • What could the fabric be used for?

Play a sorting game with images printed on cards. Categories for sorting could include stripes, plaid, checkerboard, floral, polka dot, etc.

ART MAKING CHALLENGE: 

  • Students will stamp print on paper with cardboard edges, stampers, or found objects to create patterns. 
  • Printed paper will then be cut into clothing for collage self portraits.

Jean-Marie Galing
23
 

Read Between the Brushstrokes: Using Visual Art as a Historical Source ("Unite")

This Learning Lab from the National Museum of African American History and Culture (NMAAHC) will explore the connection between visual art and history. 

When studying history, it is important to remember that all historical sources do not look the same. Visual art, being an active response to a stimulus, serves as a mirror to the contemporary landscape. Art engages in a conversation with history while acting as a visual expression of contemporary thoughts and ideas.

Through the visual art piece "Unite" by Barbara Jones-Hogu (1971), students will learn more about the cultural context of the late 1960's and early 1970's including the Black Arts Movement while honing their visual literacy competency. The questions, prompts, and information provided in this Learning Lab will help students hone their skills in visual literacy competency. Students can use this Learning Lab collection to help sharpen their historical thinking skills and expand their conceptions of historical sources.

The guiding questions of this Learning Lab are

  • What is visual art’s connection to historical events? Why is it important that we recognize these connections?
  • How do contemporary events shape artists’ responses in their art making?
  • What does studying art add to our understanding of historical events and time periods?

The goals of this Learning Lab are

  • Bridge the gap in understanding between art analysis and historical analysis
  • Explore the inherent ties between art pieces and their surrounding historical context
  • Introduce the foundations of formal art analysis and develop close looking skills for visual art pieces

If you are new to Learning Lab, visit https://learninglab.si.edu/help/getting-started to learn how to get started!

National Museum of African American History and Culture
12
 

Read Between the Brushstrokes: Using Visual Art as a Historical Source ("New Age of Slavery")

This Learning Lab from the National Museum of African American History and Culture (NMAAHC) will explore the connection between visual art and history. 

When studying history, it is important to remember that all historical sources do not look the same. Visual art, being an active response to a stimulus, serves as a mirror to the contemporary landscape. Art engages in a conversation with history while acting as a visual expression of contemporary thoughts and ideas.

Through the visual art piece "New Age of Slavery" by Patrick Campbell (2014), students will learn more about the events and cultural context of the contemporary landscape including the pattern of police brutality against African Americans and the Black Lives Matter Movement while honing their visual literacy competency. The questions, prompts, and information provided in this Learning Lab will help students hone their skills in visual literacy competency. Students can use this Learning Lab collection to help sharpen their historical thinking skills and expand their conceptions of historical sources.

The guiding questions of this Learning Lab are

  • What is visual art’s connection to historical events? Why is it important that we recognize these connections?
  • How do contemporary events shape artists’ responses in their art making?
  • What does studying art add to our understanding of historical events and time periods?

The goals of this Learning Lab are

  • Bridge the gap in understanding between art analysis and historical analysis
  • Explore the inherent ties between art pieces and their surrounding historical context
  • Introduce the foundations of formal art analysis and develop close looking skills for visual art pieces

If you are new to Learning Lab, visit https://learninglab.si.edu/help/getting-started to learn how to get started!

Keywords: NMAAHC, African American, slavery, flag, American, 13th Amendment, visual art, Black Lives Matter, lynching, United States, visual literacy

National Museum of African American History and Culture
12
 

Read Between the Brushstrokes: Using Visual Art as a Historical Source ("Ethiopia")

This Learning Lab from the National Museum of African American History and Culture (NMAAHC) will explore the connection between visual art and history. 

When studying history, it is important to remember that all historical sources do not look the same. Visual art, being an active response to a stimulus, serves as a mirror to the contemporary landscape. Art engages in a conversation with history while acting as a visual expression of contemporary thoughts and ideas.

Through the visual art piece Ethiopia by Meta Vaux Warrick Fuller (1921), students will learn more about the events and cultural context of the 1920s in America, including the Harlem Renaissance. Fuller's piece reflects the racial politics of the period, especially African Americans' quest for self identity. Ethiopia serves as a symbol of African Americans' identity exploration post-World War II and in the midst of the Pan-African movement.

The questions, prompts, and information provided in this Learning Lab will help students hone their skills in visual literacy competency. Students can use this Learning Lab collection to help sharpen their historical thinking skills and expand their conceptions of historical sources.

The guiding questions of this Learning Lab are

  • What is visual art’s connection to historical events? Why is it important that we recognize these connections?
  • How do contemporary events shape artists’ responses in their art making?
  • What does studying art add to our understanding of historical events and time periods?

The goals of this Learning Lab are

  • Bridge the gap in understanding between art analysis and historical analysis
  • Explore the inherent ties between art pieces and their surrounding historical context
  • Introduce the foundations of formal art analysis and develop close looking skills for visual art pieces

If you are new to Learning Lab, visit https://learninglab.si.edu/help/getting-started to learn how to get started!

National Museum of African American History and Culture
12
 

Read Between the Brushstrokes: Using Visual Art as a Historical Source ("Walking")

This Learning Lab from the National Museum of African American History and Culture (NMAAHC) will explore the connection between visual art and history. 

When studying history, it is important to remember that all historical sources do not look the same. Visual art, being an active response to a stimulus, serves as a mirror to the contemporary landscape. Art engages in a conversation with history while acting as a visual expression of contemporary thoughts and ideas.

Through the visual art piece "Walking" by Charles Henry Alston (1958), students will learn more about the events and cultural context of the 1950's including the Civil Rights Movement and the role of women as social activists while honing their visual literacy competency. The questions, prompts, and information provided in this Learning Lab will help students hone their skills in visual literacy competency. Students can use this Learning Lab collection to help sharpen their historical thinking skills and expand their conceptions of historical sources.

The guiding questions of this Learning Lab are

  • What is visual art’s connection to historical events? Why is it important that we recognize these connections?
  • How do contemporary events shape artists’ responses in their art making?
  • What does studying art add to our understanding of historical events and time periods?

The goals of this Learning Lab are

  • Bridge the gap in understanding between art analysis and historical analysis
  • Explore the inherent ties between art pieces and their surrounding historical context
  • Introduce the foundations of formal art analysis and develop close looking skills for visual art pieces

If you are new to Learning Lab, visit https://learninglab.si.edu/help/getting-started to learn how to get started!

National Museum of African American History and Culture
12
 

Read Between the Brushstrokes: Using Visual Art as a Historical Source ("Trapped")

This Learning Lab from the National Museum of African American History and Culture (NMAAHC) will explore the connection between visual art and history. 

When studying history, it is important to remember that all historical sources do not look the same. Visual art, being an active response to a stimulus, serves as a mirror to the contemporary landscape. Art engages in a conversation with history while acting as a visual expression of contemporary thoughts and ideas.

Through visual and historical analysis of the art piece "Trapped" Alvin Carl Hollingsworth (1965), students will learn more about the events and cultural context of the late 1960's including discriminatory housing policies and the Black Arts Movement. The questions, prompts, and information provided in this Learning Lab will help students hone their skills in visual literacy competency. Students can use this Learning Lab collection to help sharpen their historical thinking skills and expand their conceptions of historical sources.

The guiding questions of this Learning Lab are

  • What is visual art’s connection to historical events? Why is it important that we recognize these connections?
  • How do contemporary events shape artists’ responses in their art making?
  • What does studying art add to our understanding of historical events and time periods?

The goals of this Learning Lab are

  • Bridge the gap in understanding between art analysis and historical analysis
  • Explore the inherent ties between art pieces and their surrounding historical context
  • Introduce the foundations of formal art analysis and develop close looking skills for visual art pieces

If you are new to Learning Lab, visit https://learninglab.si.edu/help/getting-started to learn how to get started!

National Museum of African American History and Culture
11
 

Read Between the Brushstrokes: Using Visual Art as a Historical Source ("Increase Risk with Emotional Faith")

This Learning Lab from the National Museum of African American History and Culture (NMAAHC) will explore the connection between visual art and history. 

When studying history, it is important to remember that all historical sources do not look the same. Visual art, being an active response to a stimulus, serves as a mirror to the contemporary landscape. Art engages in a conversation with history while acting as a visual expression of contemporary thoughts and ideas.

Through the visual art piece "Increase Risk with Emotional Faith" by Kevin E. Cole (2008), students will learn more about the events and cultural context of the early 2000's including the economic recession and the election of Barack Obama. Cole's piece directly speaks to the racial politics evident in devastation of Hurricane Katrina and the violent history of segregation in the South. 

The questions, prompts, and information provided in this Learning Lab will help students hone their skills in visual literacy competency. Students can use this Learning Lab collection to help sharpen their historical thinking skills and expand their conceptions of historical sources.

The guiding questions of this Learning Lab are

  • What is visual art’s connection to historical events? Why is it important that we recognize these connections?
  • How do contemporary events shape artists’ responses in their art making?
  • What does studying art add to our understanding of historical events and time periods?

The goals of this Learning Lab are

  • Bridge the gap in understanding between art analysis and historical analysis
  • Explore the inherent ties between art pieces and their surrounding historical context
  • Introduce the foundations of formal art analysis and develop close looking skills for visual art pieces

If you are new to Learning Lab, visit https://learninglab.si.edu/help/getting-started to learn how to get started!

National Museum of African American History and Culture
12
 

Read Between the Brushstrokes: Using Visual Art as a Historical Source ("View of Lake Okanagan")

This Learning Lab from the National Museum of African American History and Culture (NMAAHC) will explore the connection between visual art and history. 

When studying history, it is important to remember that all historical sources do not look the same. Visual art, being an active response to a stimulus, serves as a mirror to the contemporary landscape. Art engages in a conversation with history while acting as a visual expression of contemporary thoughts and ideas.

Through the visual art piece View of Lake Okanagan by Grafton Tyler Brown (1882), students will learn more about the events and cultural context of the late 1800s in America. Brown's piece reflects the burgeoning environmental movement. Americans' heightened appreciation for natural lands led to the development of national parks. As a black man who passed for white his entire adult life, Brown offers a unique perspective. Students can use this Learning Lab collection to help sharpen their historical thinking skills and expand their conceptions of historical sources. The questions, prompts, and information provided in this Learning Lab will help students hone their skills in visual literacy competency.

The guiding questions of this Learning Lab are

  • What is visual art’s connection to historical events? Why is it important that we recognize these connections?
  • How do contemporary events shape artists’ responses in their art making?
  • What does studying art add to our understanding of historical events and time periods?

The goals of this Learning Lab are

  • Bridge the gap in understanding between art analysis and historical analysis
  • Explore the inherent ties between art pieces and their surrounding historical context
  • Introduce the foundations of formal art analysis and develop close looking skills for visual art pieces

If you are new to Learning Lab, visit https://learninglab.si.edu/help/getting-started to learn how to get started!

National Museum of African American History and Culture
12
 

Read Between the Brushstrokes: Using Visual Art as a Historical Source ("Off to War")

This Learning Lab from the National Museum of African American History and Culture (NMAAHC) will explore the connection between visual art and history. 

When studying history, it is important to remember that all historical sources do not look the same. Visual art, being an active response to a stimulus, serves as a mirror to the contemporary landscape. Art engages in a conversation with history while acting as a visual expression of contemporary thoughts and ideas.

Through the visual art piece Off to War by William H. Johnson (1942-1944), students will learn more about the events and cultural context of the 1940s in America. Johnson’s piece responds to the tumultuous political and social climate of the period with a consciously naïve depiction of an African American family sending their son off to war. His painting sheds light on the deeply personal impact of World War II on domestic America, especially the African American community. Students can use this Learning Lab collection to help sharpen their historical thinking skills, hone their visual literacy competency, and expand their conceptions of historical sources. The questions, prompts, and information provided in this Learning Lab will help students hone their skills in visual literacy competency.

The guiding questions of this Learning Lab are

  • What is visual art’s connection to historical events? Why is it important that we recognize these connections?
  • How do contemporary events shape artists’ responses in their art making?
  • What does studying art add to our understanding of historical events and time periods?

The goals of this Learning Lab are

  • Bridge the gap in understanding between art analysis and historical analysis
  • Explore the inherent ties between art pieces and their surrounding historical context
  • Introduce the foundations of formal art analysis and develop close looking skills for visual art pieces

If you are new to Learning Lab, visit https://learninglab.si.edu/help/getting-started to learn how to get started!

National Museum of African American History and Culture
12
 

Area Artists: Washington, D.C.

This Learning Lab from the National Museum of African American History and Culture (NMAAHC) will explore three different visual artists with ties to Washington, D.C.

As a black women artists, Alma Thomas, Elizabeth Catlett, and Loïs Mailou Jones encountered many barriers to success. All three artists lived and worked in Washington, D.C. throughout their careers. They contributed to the social, artistic, and academic communities within the nation's capital and beyond. 

Visitors to this Learning Lab collection will have the opportunity  to learn more about Alma Thomas, Elizabeth Catlett, and Loïs Mailou Jones, and their approaches to art and art making. The questions, prompts, and information provided in this Learning Lab will help students develop their knowledge of Washington D.C. history and foster an appreciation for great artists. 

The guiding questions of this Learning Lab are

  • Who are Alma Thomas, Elizabeth Catlett, and Loïs Mailou Jones?
  • How were these artists' personal lives and artistic practices shaped by their time in Washington, D.C.?
  • What inspired each artist to create their works?
  • How are the artists' works similar? How are they different?

If you are new to Learning Lab, visit https://learninglab.si.edu/help/getting-started to learn how to get started!

National Museum of African American History and Culture
13
 

In Full Color: The Black Arts Movement of the 1960s-70s

This Learning Lab from the National Museum of African American History and Culture (NMAAHC) will explore the Black Arts Movement of the 1960s and 70s. 

When studying history, it is important to remember that all historical sources do not look the same. Visual art, being an active response to a stimulus, serves as a mirror to the contemporary landscape. Art engages in a conversation with history while acting as a visual expression of contemporary thoughts and ideas.

Through this collection of resources from different Smithsonian museum and biographies of famous artists, students will learn more about the major influences and themes of this period of African American revolution and expression. The questions, prompts, and information provided in this Learning Lab will help students hone their skills in synthesizing information and analyzing primary sources. 

The guiding questions of this Learning Lab are

  • What are the dominant themes of the social and political climate of the 1960s and 70s?
  • How did the major events of the 1960s and 70s shape the artistic production of the period?
  • Who were some of the influential figures in the Black Arts Movement?
  • What are some of the shared goals of African American artists during the 1960s and 70s?
  • How did artists during this period respond to the the social and political climate?

If you are new to Learning Lab, visit https://learninglab.si.edu/help/getting-started to learn how to get started!

National Museum of African American History and Culture
36
 

Abstract Sculpture

For younger students, play an "I Spy" or sorting game with sculpture images. Attributes to look for:

  • Geometric shapes/forms
  • Biomorphic shapes/forms
  • Inside/outside sculptures
  • Sculptures that resemble animals or people
  • Sculptures that don't resemble anything
  • Big/little sculptures - explain how you decided this (scale in relation to its surroundings)

With older students, challenge them to construct a definition of abstraction based on what they observe in the sculptures.

Jean-Marie Galing
23
 

Representational, Abstract, or Nonrepresentational?

Introductory Activity: Print image cards for small group collaboration. Students will sort images into three categories:

  1. Representational Art (realistic imagery)
  2. Abstract Art (recognizable imagery that does not reflect actual appearance)
  3. Nonrepresentational Art (does not represent a depiction of the physical appearance of people or objects)

Formal Analysis Activity: 

Choose a few images to compare and contrast: How did the artist use line, shape, color, balance, repetition, or overall composition to convey

  1. The illusion of movement or rhythm
  2. Visual tension
  3. A mood or feeling

NOTE: pdf file of these images is meant to be printed front-to-back so that citations will appear on the reverse side of each image. 


Jean-Marie Galing
25
 

Reading Portraiture: A Guide for Educators

The National Portrait Gallery tells the story of the United States by portraying the people who shape the nation’s history, development, and culture. These individuals understand who we are and remind us of what we can aspire to be.

This Learning Lab collection was designed so that educators can use portraits as a springboard for a conversation in their classrooms. Portraits present insights into history and biography, prompt writing in the classroom, inspire students to create self-portraits, and even offer great ties to science and mathematics. In this guide, you will discover how to teach students to spot visual clues in artworks and then analyze them, similar to dissecting a historical document. Teaching students to use close reading skills with portraiture will produce a rich and memorable investigation of both the sitter and the artist.

The "Learning to Look" strategies in this guide offer unique ways to engage in close looking and portraiture with your students. The "Elements of Portrayal" provide more guiding questions to help you and your students learn how to read portraiture.

#NPGteach

Nicole Vance
61
 

Shaping America: Exploring Portraiture from the Colonial Era to the Civil War

Meet the politicians, reformers, inventors, authors, soldiers, and others who shaped the course of American history from the Colonial Era through the Civil War. Students will analyze portraits to learn about the diverse and significant contributions to American society made by individuals in the National Portrait Gallery’s collection.

#NPGteach

Objectives: After completing this lesson, students will be better able to:

  •  Identify important Americans and analyze their contributions to U.S. History
  • Identify key components of a portrait and discuss what we can learn about the sitter through these components

Keywords: Colonies, Revolutionary War, Westward Expansion, Civil War, Abolition, Suffrage

Nicole Vance
68
 

Let's Make and Play: Making Mobiles

In this activity, you'll use common craft supplies to create a mobile. Look at the following Smithsonian resources for inspiration, then complete the activity that follows.

Parents and caregivers can use this activity to help children gain a better understanding of basic shape compositions, and counting by ones and tens. Let’s Make and Play activities are designed to be children-led activities with minimal direction or oversight required.

Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access
15
 

Uncovering America: Manifest Destiny and the West

In what ways was the US settled and unsettled in the 19th century?

What role did artists play in shaping public understandings of the US West?

Discover compelling stories of creativity, struggle, and resilience in this new set of resources for K–12 educators featuring works of art that reflect the richness and diversity of the people, places, and cultures of the United States.

National Gallery of Art
4
 

Uncovering America: Expressing the Individual

How is identity shaped, formed, and expressed?

How can works of art help us understand our world and ourselves more fully?

Discover compelling stories of creativity, struggle, and resilience in this new set of resources for K–12 educators featuring works of art that reflect the richness and diversity of the people, places, and cultures of the United States.

National Gallery of Art
4
 

Re-Imagining Migration DC Seminar Series, 2019-2020: Session 2

What specifically is the role of the arts in helping us construct welcoming and inclusive societies for all through education?

This collection is the second in a series of four created to support the Re-Imagining Migration DC Seminar Series, held between December 2019 and March 2020. The seminar series is led by Verónica Boix Mansilla, Senior Principal Investigator for Harvard Graduate School of Education's Project Zero, and Research Director for Re-Imagining Migration, with in-gallery experiences provided by educators from the Smithsonian American Art Museum, the National Museum of American History, the National Portrait Gallery, the Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access, and the National Gallery of Art. This set of collections is designed to be dynamic. We will continue to add material, including participant-created content, throughout the seminar series so that the collections themselves can be used as a type of textbook, reflecting the content, development, and outputs of the full seminar series. Please check back to the hashtag #ReImaginingMigration to see a growing body of materials to support educators as they strive to serve and teach about human migration in relevant and deep ways.

Key to the question of justice in a world shaped by migration is the “recognition gap” – migrants/refugees having lost the status, belonging and recognition in the old land, find themselves unrecognized (viewed as less worthy or invisible) in the new. What are the practices of re-representation/de-stigmatization that prove most effective to bring to light our default “single stories” our “fear” ? What are the daily, aesthetic and cultural tools we have to contribute to the de-stigmatization the refugee, restoring dignity to his, her narrative? In what ways might different lenses (media, demographics, history, art) afford us insights that are unique and relevant?  

In this session we examine the role of the arts to help us engage a topic as difficult and sensitive as the 70 million fellow human beings who have been forced to leave their home.  Our goal is to begin to articulate what arts and artists do when inviting us to engage in complex issues. Because the particulars of a given lens are best highlighted in comparison with others we experience three lenses attempting to tell a similar story about the situation of refugees today: Art, photojournalism, demography.  

Our approach:  We experience Mosses, A WP visual essay and UNHCR report

We ask:  about whom? By whom? For whom? How it speaks to me?  

We then examine the unique affordances of the arts and how other lenses can intersect.

#reimaginingmigration

National Gallery of Art
28
1-24 of 223 Collections