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Found 714 Resources

Seoul--Korea

Smithsonian American Art Museum

Braniff Seoul

National Air and Space Museum
SEOUL BRANIFF Color photographic commercial aviation print. Reproduction of ceremonial dragon, blue border, airplane (Boeing 747) flies below image block; blue, orange red and green tones on paper; Offset Photolithograph.

Fly Now: The National Air and Space Museum Poster Collection

Throughout their history, posters have been a significant means of mass communication, often with striking visual effect. Wendy Wick Reaves, the Smithsonian Portrait Gallery Curator of Prints and Drawings, comments that "sometimes a pictorial poster is a decorative masterpiece-something I can't walk by without a jolt of aesthetic pleasure. Another might strike me as extremely clever advertising … But collectively, these 'pictures of persuasion,' as we might call them, offer a wealth of art, history, design, and popular culture for us to understand. The poster is a familiar part of our world, and we intuitively understand its role as propaganda, promotion, announcement, or advertisement."

Reaves' observations are especially relevant for the impressive array of aviation posters in the National Air and Space Museum's 1300+ artifact collection. Quite possibly the largest publicly-held collection of its kind in the United States, the National Air and Space Museum's posters focus primarily on advertising for aviation-related products and activities. Among other areas, the collection includes 19th-century ballooning exhibition posters, early 20th-century airplane exhibition and meet posters, and twentieth-century airline advertisements.

The posters in the collection represent printing technologies that include original lithography, silkscreen, photolithography, and computer-generated imagery. The collection is significant both for its aesthetic value and because it is a unique representation of the cultural, commercial and military history of aviation. The collection represents an intense interest in flight, both public and private, during a significant period of its technological and social development.

Copyright Disclosure for Orphaned Works

Whenever possible, the museum provides factual information about copyright owners and related matters in its records and other texts related to the collections. For many of the images in this collection, some of which were created for or by corporate entities that no longer exist, the museum does not own any copyrights. Therefore, it generally does not grant or deny permission to copy, distribute or otherwise use material in this collection. If identified, permission and possible fees may be required from the copyright owner independently of the museum. It is the user's obligation to determine and satisfy copyright or other use restrictions when copying, distributing or otherwise using materials found in the museum's collections. Transmission or reproduction of protected materials beyond that allowed by fair use requires the written permission of the copyright owners. Users must make their own assessments of rights in light of their intended use.

If you have any more information about an item you've seen in the Fly Now: The National Air and Space Museum Poster Collection, or if you are a copyright owner and believe we have not properly attributed your work to you or have used it without permission, we want to hear from you. Please contact pisanod@si.edu with your contact information and a link to the relevant content.

View more information about the Smithsonian's general copyright policies at http://www.si.edu/termsofuse

East Gate, Seoul

Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery

East Gate, Seoul

Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery

Seoul Korean Air

National Air and Space Museum
Offset Photolithograph: Reproduction of photographic image of snow covered buildings (temples?); white, red and black hues on heavy stock, sized paper.

Fly Now: The National Air and Space Museum Poster Collection

Throughout their history, posters have been a significant means of mass communication, often with striking visual effect. Wendy Wick Reaves, the Smithsonian Portrait Gallery Curator of Prints and Drawings, comments that "sometimes a pictorial poster is a decorative masterpiece-something I can't walk by without a jolt of aesthetic pleasure. Another might strike me as extremely clever advertising … But collectively, these 'pictures of persuasion,' as we might call them, offer a wealth of art, history, design, and popular culture for us to understand. The poster is a familiar part of our world, and we intuitively understand its role as propaganda, promotion, announcement, or advertisement."

Reaves' observations are especially relevant for the impressive array of aviation posters in the National Air and Space Museum's 1300+ artifact collection. Quite possibly the largest publicly-held collection of its kind in the United States, the National Air and Space Museum's posters focus primarily on advertising for aviation-related products and activities. Among other areas, the collection includes 19th-century ballooning exhibition posters, early 20th-century airplane exhibition and meet posters, and twentieth-century airline advertisements.

The posters in the collection represent printing technologies that include original lithography, silkscreen, photolithography, and computer-generated imagery. The collection is significant both for its aesthetic value and because it is a unique representation of the cultural, commercial and military history of aviation. The collection represents an intense interest in flight, both public and private, during a significant period of its technological and social development.

East Gate, Seoul, Sunrise

Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery

Map Of Seoul (Suseon Jeondo)

NMNH - Anthropology Dept.
"Late 19th century. Hand drawn and hand colored paper. This map of old Seoul and its environs encompasses the areas surrounded by Mount Bukhan and the Han River. Jeondo means complete map or whole view. Information about the Seoul city wall and the administrative districts is inscribed in Chinese on each side under the title. The inscription reads: the city wall is 9,975 bo [approximately 17 kilometers] in circumference, 40 cheok 2 chon [approximately 12 meters] high, and has eight gates; Seoul is divided into five districts under the administrative division called bu and the districts are subdivided into forty-nine smaller sections known as bang. Bernadou has inscribed a note on pronunciation and translation in English in the margin. This map includes pictorial features of mountain ranges, palace structures, temples, and city gates, all of which face the center of the city... Collected in Seoul. Ref: Hough Korean Catalog p. 488; Bernadou Field Notes 25" [from: "An Ethnography of the Hermit Kingdom: The J.B. Bernadou Korean Collection 1884-1885", Chang-su Cho Houchins, 2004, number 146]

Screen, Porcelain:Wood:Paint:from Royal Palace, Seoul, Korea n.d

National Anthropological Archives
Black and white photoprint on cardboard mount

Screen, Porcelain:Wood:Paint:from Royal Palace, Seoul, Korea n.d

National Anthropological Archives
Photo Prior to 1891?

Black and white photoprint on cardboard mount

Screen, Porcelain:Wood:Paint:from Royal Palace, Seoul, Korea n.d

National Anthropological Archives
Black and white photoprint on cardboard mount

Screen, Porcelain:Wood:Paint:from Royal Palace, Seoul, Korea n.d

National Anthropological Archives
Black and white photoprint on cardboard mount

Screen, Porcelain:Wood:Paint:from Royal Palace, Seoul, Korea n.d

National Anthropological Archives
Black and white photoprint on cardboard mount

A Korean mother flees the fighting around Seoul

National Museum of American History
Carl Mydans covered the Korean War for almost a year between 1950 and 1951. During that period, Seoul changed hands four times. By March of 1951, the city was in ruins, mostly destroyed in vicious street battles. Its prewar population dropping from 1.5 million inhabitants to a mere 200,000 plagued by massive food shortages. Throughout the war, Mydans witnessed how millions of Koreans were uprooted from their homes by bombing, shelling, or fear, and recorded their attempts to flee to safety.

Robots Will Lead Passengers to Their Gate at Seoul's Airport

Smithsonian Magazine

Robots are taking over.

Starting this month, robots will invade Seoul’s Incheon International Airport. The robots will drive themselves around the airport, assisting passengers and picking up litter.

Troika, as one robot is called, stands 4.5 feet tall and responds to its name when travelers need help, according to Associated Press.

(Courtesy of LG Electronics)

Passengers traveling through the airport can scan their boarding pass and Troika will take them directly to their gate. (Theoretically Troika is not programmed with spite, so the robot will not lead rude passengers on an aimless route through the airport.) If passengers start to lag behind the robot, Troika will say “Please stay closer so I can see you."

The robot will be able to speak English, Korean, Chinese, and Japanese by the end of the month. It can tell passengers the weather in their final destination, information about flights or display a map of the airport. When it speaks, Troika’s screen shows eyes that blink and smile.

Another robot will assist maintenance teams around the airport, picking up and collecting any debris that it encounters on its rounds. Incheon Airport said in a statement that it does not expect the robots to replace humans, only add extra assistance during overnight shifts or particularly busy days.

This is only the latest example in a series of airport robot takeovers. At Geneva Airport, there’s a robot named Leo that checks passengers in and takes their checked bags to the baggage handling area. And meanwhile in Amsterdam, there’s a robot named Spencer who can recognize emotion and help passengers make connecting flights.

Other articles from Travel + Leisure:

Sang P'yong T'ong Bo, Chinhyulch'ong, Charity Office in Seoul, Korea, 1742 - 1752

National Museum of American History
One (1) sang p'yong t'ong bo coin, Charity Office in Seoul

Korea, 1742 - 1752

Obverse Image: Four Chinese characters read top, bottom, right, left

Obverse Text: Romanization: SANG / P'YONG / T'ONG / BO (Translation: Always Even Currency)

Reverse Image: Chinhyulch'ong, character for Charity Office in Seoul at top, circle to the right, character for two to the bottom.

Reverse Text: Romanization: CHIN / I (Translation: Chinhyulch'ong, Charity Office in Seoul, Two). General Information: Worth 2 cash.

Sang P'yong T'ong Bo, Chinhyulch'ong, Charity Office in Seoul, Korea, 1742

National Museum of American History
One (1) sang p'yong t'ong bo coin, Charity Office in Seoul

Korea, 1742

Obverse Image: Four Chinese characters read top, bottom, right, left

Obverse Text: Romanization: SANG / P'YONG / T'ONG / BO (Translation: Always Even Currency)

Reverse Image: Chinhyulch'ong, character for Charity Office in Seoul at top, character for seven at bottom.

Reverse Text: Romanization: CHIN / YUK(Translation: Chinhyulch'ong, Charity Office in Seoul, Seven).

Sang P'yong T'ong Bo, Chinhyulch'ong, Charity Office in Seoul, Korea, 1742

National Museum of American History
One (1) sang p'yong t'ong bo coin, Charity Office in Seoul

Korea, 1742

Obverse Image: Four Chinese characters read top, bottom, right, left

Obverse Text: Romanization: SANG / P'YONG / T'ONG / BO (Translation: Always Even Currency)

Reverse Image: Chinhyulch'ong, character for Charity Office in Seoul at top, character for eight at bottom.

Reverse Text: Romanization: CHIN / P'AL (Translation: Chinhyulch'ong, Charity Office in Seoul, Eight).

Sang P'yong T'ong Bo, Chinhyulch'ong, Charity Office in Seoul, Korea, 1742

National Museum of American History
One (1) sang p'yong t'ong bo coin, Charity Office in Seoul

Korea, 1742

Obverse Image: Four Chinese characters read top, bottom, right, left

Obverse Text: Romanization: SANG / P'YONG / T'ONG / BO (Translation: Always Even Currency)

Reverse Image: Chinhyulch'ong, character for Charity Office in Seoul at top, character for six at bottom.

Reverse Text: Romanization: CHIN / YUK(Translation: Chinhyulch'ong, Charity Office in Seoul, Six).

Sang P'yong T'ong Bo, Chinhyulch'ong, Charity Office in Seoul, Korea, 1742

National Museum of American History
One (1) sang p'yong t'ong bo coin, Charity Office in Seoul

Korea, 1742

Obverse Image: Four Chinese characters read top, bottom, right, left

Obverse Text: Romanization: SANG / P'YONG / T'ONG / BO (Translation: Always Even Currency)

Reverse Image: Chinhyulch'ong, character for Charity Office in Seoul at top, character for two at bottom.

Reverse Text: Romanization: CHIN / I (Translation: Chinhyulch'ong, Charity Office in Seoul, Two).

Sang P'yong T'ong Bo, Chinhyulch'ong, Charity Office in Seoul, Korea, 1742

National Museum of American History
One (1) sang p'yong t'ong bo coin, Charity Office in Seoul

Korea, 1742

Obverse Image: Four Chinese characters read top, bottom, right, left

Obverse Text: Romanization: SANG / P'YONG / T'ONG / BO (Translation: Always Even Currency)

Reverse Image: Chinhyulch'ong, character for Charity Office in Seoul at top, character for eight at bottom.

Reverse Text: Romanization: CHIN / P'AL (Translation: Chinhyulch'ong, Charity Office in Seoul, Eight).

Sang P'yong T'ong Bo, Chinhyulch'ong, Charity Office in Seoul, Korea, 1742

National Museum of American History
One (1) sang p'yong t'ong bo coin, Charity Office in Seoul

Korea, 1742

Obverse Image: Four Chinese characters read top, bottom, right, left

Obverse Text: Romanization: SANG / P'YONG / T'ONG / BO (Translation: Always Even Currency)

Reverse Image: Chinhyulch'ong, character for Charity Office in Seoul at top, character for four at bottom.

Reverse Text: Romanization: CHIN / SA (Translation: Chinhyulch'ong, Charity Office in Seoul, Four).

Sang P'yong T'ong Bo, Chinhyulch'ong, Charity Office in Seoul, Korea, 1695 - 1742

National Museum of American History
One (1) sang p'yong t'ong bo coin, Charity Office in Seoul

Korea, 1695 - 1742

Obverse Image: Four Chinese characters read top, bottom, right, left

Obverse Text: Romanization: SANG / P'YONG / T'ONG / BO (Translation: Always Even Currency)

Reverse Image: Chinhyulch'ong, character for Charity Office in Seoul at top, crescent to the left, character for two to the bottom.

Reverse Text: Romanization: CHIN / I (Translation: Chinhyulch'ong, Charity Office in Seoul, Two). General Information: Worth 2 cash.

Sang P'yong T'ong Bo, Chinhyulch'ong, Charity Office in Seoul, Korea, 1742 - 1752

National Museum of American History
One (1) sang p'yong t'ong bo coin, Charity Office in Seoul

Korea, 1742 - 1752

Obverse Image: Four Chinese characters read top, bottom, right, left

Obverse Text: Romanization: SANG / P'YONG / T'ONG / BO (Translation: Always Even Currency)

Reverse Image: Chinhyulch'ong, character for Charity Office in Seoul at top, circle to the right, character for two to the bottom.

Reverse Text: Romanization: CHIN / I (Translation: Chinhyulch'ong, Charity Office in Seoul, Two). General Information: Worth 2 cash.

Sang P'yong T'ong Bo, Chinhyulch'ong, Charity Office in Seoul, Korea, 1742

National Museum of American History
One (1) sang p'yong t'ong bo coin, Charity Office in Seoul

Korea, 1742

Obverse Image: Four Chinese characters read top, bottom, right, left

Obverse Text: Romanization: SANG / P'YONG / T'ONG / BO (Translation: Always Even Currency)

Reverse Image: Chinhyulch'ong, character for Charity Office in Seoul at top, character for three at bottom.

Reverse Text: Romanization: CHIN / SAM (Translation: Chinhyulch'ong, Charity Office in Seoul, Three).
1-24 of 714 Resources