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Rocky Mountain Twayblade (Ophrys necrophylla)

Smithsonian American Art Museum

Rocky Mountain Kalmia (Kalmia microphylla)

Smithsonian American Art Museum

Rocky Mountain Cassiope (Cassiope mertensiana)

Smithsonian American Art Museum

Rocky Mountains, Colorado

Smithsonian American Art Museum

The Rocky Mountains, [photomechanical print]

Archives and Special Collections, Smithsonian American Art Museum
(Label on back, stamped and inscribed:) Library of Congress / Copy Received 2/7/1911 / Copyright Entry / Class J XXc. No. 151734 / Copy B Delivered to Prints Division / 44245 / Bierstadt, Albert / The Rocky Mountains.

The Rocky Mountains, etched proof

National Museum of American History
Albert Bierstadt's (1830–1902) large painting, The Rocky Mountains, Lander's Peak, completed in 1863, presented the drama of the American West to audiences in the Eastern United States. The Rocky Mountains was Bierstadt's first big success, and he quickly developed a marketing strategy to promote his work. He contracted with engraver James Smillie (1807–1885) to produce a large black-and-white reproductive print. Then he sent the painting on tour, to be exhibited in art galleries in several eastern cities, accompanied by a subscription book and promotional flyers describing the engraving. It was available in four versions, from a limited number of artists' proofs priced at $50 each to an unlimited edition of plain proofs at $10 each. Public exhibitions in commercial galleries, together with the growth of the print trade, expanded opportunities for people to see paintings and purchase reproductions. Publishing prints enhanced an artist's reputation and added significantly to his income, but engraving on steel was a slow and painstaking process. It took Smillie more than three years to complete his work, in part because the painting was unavailable for him to copy. First Smillie drew the details of the image with a needle on a large steel plate, measuring 43 by 70.5 centimeters. This background image was etched in acid, and the Museum's copy is an early stage proof made "off the acid" to check Smillie's progress with the design. Several areas of the print remain to be completed. They were finished by hand with the engraver's cutting tool called the burin. In 1888 Smillie's son George donated this proof, which had been signed and dated by his father in 1865. Bierstadt also donated a signed impression of the final state of the print. Both states were exhibited together to demonstrate the process of engraving.

The Rocky Mountains, final proof

National Museum of American History
Albert Bierstadt's (1830–1902) large painting, The Rocky Mountains, Lander's Peak, completed in 1863, presented the drama of the American West to audiences in the Eastern United States. Although it was more than a decade after the Gold Rush drew settlers to California, most people still had not seen many images of the West. Bierstadt specialized in these landscapes, and he produced impressive paintings of Yosemite and other Western scenes. The Rocky Mountains was Bierstadt's first big success, and he quickly developed a marketing strategy to promote his work. He contracted with engraver James Smillie (1807–1885) to produce a large black-and-white reproductive print. Then he sent the painting on tour, to be exhibited in art galleries in several eastern cities, accompanied by a subscription book and promotional flyers describing the engraving. It was available in four versions, from a limited number of artists' proofs priced at $50 each to an unlimited edition of plain proofs at $10 each. The painting was shown in 1864 at Civil War Sanitary Commission fairs in New York, Philadelphia, and Chicago, before being sold to an English businessman. Since 1907 it has been in the collection of the Metropolitan Museum of Art. Public exhibitions in commercial galleries, together with the growth of the print trade, expanded opportunities for people to see paintings and purchase reproductions. Throughout his career, Bierstadt issued prints after his paintings, using many different graphic processes. Publishing prints enhanced an artist's reputation and added significantly to his income, but engraving on steel was a slow and painstaking process. It took Smillie more than three years to complete his work. In 1888 the Museum received this final state of the print directly from Bierstadt, and Smillie's son George donated an early etched proof. Both states were exhibited together to demonstrate the process of engraving.

39c Rocky Mountains single

National Postal Museum
unused

Rocky Mountain Goats

Smithsonian Institution Archives
Scientific name: [Oreamnos americanus].

Rocky Mountain goats in exterior enclosure at the National Zoological Park.

Rocky Mountain Goat

Smithsonian Institution Archives
Scientific name: [Oreamnos americanus].

Rocky mountain goat in yard at the National Zoological Park. A man, possibly Senator William E. Borah of Idaho, is visible in the background.

Rocky Mountain Goats

Smithsonian Institution Archives
Scientific name: [Oreamnos americanus].

Rocky Mountain goats in exterior enclosure at the National Zoological Park.

Rocky Mountain Goats

Smithsonian Institution Archives
Also known as NZP-645

Scientific name: [Oreamnos americanus].

See also Record Unit 95, Box 47, Folder 18.

Rocky Mountain goats in yard at the National Zoological Park.

Rocky Mountain Goats

Smithsonian Institution Archives
Scientific name: [Oreamnos americanus].

Rocky Mountain goats in exterior enclosure at the National Zoological Park.

Rocky Mountain High

National Portrait Gallery

Rocky Mountain Glacier

Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery

Rocky Mountain Tea

National Museum of American History
The indications or uses for this product as provided on its packaging:

For the treatment of constipation

The Rocky Mountains, Lander's Peak

National Museum of American History

Mom and Dad, Rocky Mountain National Park, Colorado

Smithsonian American Art Museum
Bosworth uses a distinctive method to make her panoramic photographs. She begins by exposing two, three, or four eight-by-ten-inch negatives in sequence, and then makes a contact print by setting the negatives side by side on a single sheet of photographic paper. The unexposed border of the film where the negatives meet appears as a black line. Although Bosworth could easily trim this mark away, she chooses not to hide the seam between each frame, preferring the evidence of her technique to remain visible. At a time when digital manipulation is becoming the norm, it is refreshing to encounter images that consciously draw attention to the photographic process and the manner of an image's creation.Earth and Sky: Photographs by Barbara Bosworth exhibition label

Rocky Mountain Goat Group

Smithsonian Archives - History Div
Photograph included in the transcript of the Watson M. Perrygo Oral History Interviews by Pamela M. Henson, August 16, 1978, in Smithsonian Institution Archives.

An exhibit case in the United States National Museum, now the National Museum of Natural History, of Rocky Mountain Goats climbing on rocks. The specimens were collected by Smithsonian Secretary Charles D. Walcott and prepared by William L. Brown

Rocky Mountain Bighorn Sheep

Smithsonian Institution Archives
Scientific name: [Ovis canadensis canadensis].

Rocky Mountain bighorn sheep in yard at the National Zoological Park.

Rocky Mountain Bighorn Sheep

Smithsonian Institution Archives
Scientific name: [Ovis canadensis canadensis].

Rocky Mountain bighorn sheep in yard at the National Zoological Park.

Rocky Mountain Bighorn Sheep

Smithsonian Institution Archives
Scientific name: [Ovis canadensis canadensis].

Rocky Mountain sheep in yard outside the Eland House at the National Zoological Park.
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