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Lines of Political Rhetoric

Cooper-Hewitt, National Design Museum
Image features a cartoon of Thomas Nast and George Curtis in the 'Harper's Weekly' editor's office. Please scroll down to read the blog post about this object.Today discussions concerning the divisive power of political rhetoric are being addressed throughout the national media. This drawing captures a pivotal moment in nineteenth-century American history that juxtaposes a similar debate. Thomas Nast (1840-1902) joined the staff of Harper’s Weekly in 1862 and his drawings of the Civil War established his reputation. George William Curtis...

Composition and Rhetoric For Schools

National Museum of American History

The Rhetorical Reader

National Museum of American History

Understanding and appreciation of the essay [sound recording] / by Morris Schreiber

Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
Cover design by Ronald Clyne.

Transcript of the record by Morris Schreiber in booklet (8 p.) inserted in original cover.

Performed by the University Players, with Wallace House, director.

Related materials may be found in the Moses and Frances Asch Collection, also held by this repository. Related materials may include correspondence between the studio, producers, and/or performers; original cover art designs; original production materials; business records; and audiotapes from studio production.

Creative writing [sound recording] / prepared and narrated by Morris Schreiber

Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
Cover design by Ronald Clyne.

Script by Morris Schreiber in booklet (12 p.) inserted in original cover.

Performed by the University Players directed by Wallace House.

Related materials may be found in the Moses and Frances Asch Collection, also held by this repository. Related materials may include correspondence between the studio, producers, and/or performers; original cover art designs; original production materials; business records; and audiotapes from studio production.

How to write an effective composition [sound recording] / written and narrated by Morris Schreiber

Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
Cover design by Ronald Clyne.

Instructional notes and supplemental materials by Morris Schreiber from "The Anatomy of Language" in booklet (12 p.) inserted in original cover.

The disc is related to the the larger set of 7 discs titled The Anatomy of Lanuage (FI 9108).

"This record, FI9106, HOW TO WRITE AN EFFECTIVE COMPOSITION, is from Folkways unique set of education records, especially produced for college entrance preparation in English" -- text from notes [sic].

Notes include an excerpt from a review of "The Anatomy of Language" by Joseph Mersand.

Narrated by Morris Schreiber.

Related materials may be found in the Moses and Frances Asch Collection, also held by this repository. Related materials may include correspondence between the studio, producers, and/or performers; original cover art designs; original production materials; business records; and audiotapes from studio production.

Kiowa Peyote Meeting [sound recording]

Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
Included program notes from original recording (12 p. ; 28 cm.).

[Recorded in Anadarko, Okla., in 1964-65].

The anatomy of language [sound recording] / written and narrated by Morris Schreiber

Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
Cover design by Ronald Clyne.

Accompanying book by Morris Schreiber, The Anatomy of Language (104 p.) inserted in original cover with one, double-sided addenda sheet. Note booklets for FI 9106 and FI 9107 are also included.

The set includes one sound disc from FI 9106 and one from FI 9107, as well as the notes accompanying those recordings. Both discs were also published separately in 1962.

Lessons often comprise multiple tracks, and as result each side contains more tracks than are listed on the label.

The complete title of Lesson 7 is: People: Man - His Mental and Spiritual Aspects: PART 1: Family and Religion (track 501) ; PART 2: Education and Government (track 601).

"Written and Narrated by Morris Schreiber, New York City Principal and College Lecturer in English." -- text from cover.

Related materials may be found in the Moses and Frances Asch Collection, also held by this repository. Related materials may include correspondence between the studio, producers, and/or performers; original cover art designs; original production materials; business records; and audiotapes from studio production.

Guidance through literature [sound recording] : windows for youth / by Morris Schreiber

Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
Cover by Ronald Clyne.

Script by Morris Schreiber in booklet (12 p.) inserted in original cover.

Read by the University Players (Kenneth Buckridge, Wallace House, Herb McFarland, Morris Schreiber) directed by Wallace House.

Related materials may be found in the Moses and Frances Asch Collection, also held by this repository. Related materials may include correspondence between the studio, producers, and/or performers; original cover art designs; original production materials; business records; and audiotapes from studio production.

Songs from the out-ports of Newfoundland [sound recording] / recorded and edited by MacEdward Leach

Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
Notes by MacEdward Leach and song lyrics in booklet (8 p.) inserted in container.

Track 103, "The Farmyard" is a version of "Old McDonald Had a Farm."

Album cover design by Irwin Rosenhouse.

Recorded in Newfoundland, 1950-51.

Decision for youth [sound recording] : integrating the study of memorable selections from literature / by Morris Schreiber

Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives and Collections
Cover design by Ronald Clyne.

Script by Morris Schrieber in booklet (12 p.) inserted in original cover.

"Guidance Units in Literature, Series 2" -- text from cover.

Performed by the University Players (Patricia Gardner, Lillian Gell, Lillian Schreiber, Albert Ackel, Kenneth Buckridge, Wallace House, Morris Schreiber), directed by Wallace House.

Related materials may be found in the Moses and Frances Asch Collection, also held by this repository. Related materials may include correspondence between the studio, producers, and/or performers; original cover art designs; original production materials; business records; and audiotapes from studio production.

Interactive Gettysburg Address

SI Center for Learning and Digital Access
Interactive version of the Gettysburg address features zooming in on the document, clicking on highlighted passages for contextual information, and listening to actor Liam Neeson read it. Transcripts available in English and Spanish. Part of the online exhibit The Gettysburg Address.

"I Am a Mexican (feat. Rick Treviño)" by Los Texmaniacs [Official Music Video]

Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage
Official video for "I Am a Mexican" performed by Los Texmaniacs, featuring country star Rick Treviño! Grammy award–winning Texas Mexican country singer-songwriter Rick Treviño interprets his own song. He wrote it in response to public rhetoric in the political arena that denigrated Mexicans. Couched in terms of a disparaging beloved, it points to the strong work ethic of Mexican people and their admiration for the opportunities of the United States. Says Treviño, “The origin [of the song] is from two places. Mainly it’s from being third generation Mexican American. . . . Second, since there’s such a heated conversation about undocumented immigrants, it just seems that the undocumented immigrant does not have a voice in this. The political rhetoric is pretty heated, and it just felt like this is what I wanted to say about undocumented immigration, and the song line that says, ‘A made-in-America man’ is the hook—‘I am a Mexican,’. . . so it’s just giving a voice to the voiceless, from my perspective. "Cruzando Borders" available here: https://folkways.si.edu/los-texmaniac... Los Texmaniacs Twitter: https://twitter.com/texmaniacs74 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/texmaniacs/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/texmaniacs/ Smithsonian Folkways: http://www.folkways.si.edu/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/Folkways Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/smithsonianf... Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/smithsonian... The content and comments posted here are subject to the Smithsonian Institution copyright and privacy policy (/www.si.edu/copyright/). Smithsonian reserves the right in its sole discretion to remove any content at any time.

Audre Lorde

National Portrait Gallery
Audre Lorde’s poetry is animated by her deep anger against the oppression of women. Poetry was a way for her, as a young woman coming out as a lesbian, to speak with her own voice. It gave her the power to address society, advocating cultural and political change. Poems are not political slogans, of course, and it is only by rhetorical balance that poetry, however incendiary the subject, can occur. As Lorde put it in her white-hot poem "Power," about a police killing: "unless I learn to use the difference between poetry and rhetoric / my power too will run corrupt as poisonous mold." Like many politically engaged women writers, Lorde used her poetry as a way of writing her way out from under a language corrupted by the abuses of history, toward a new poetics—and a new politics.

John Foster Dulles

National Portrait Gallery
Foster Dulles, as he was always called, was born and raised to be secretary of state; both his grandfather and uncle held that office. Serving in that capacity under Dwight D. Eisenhower, Dulles employed the heated rhetoric of anti-Communism, threatening to meet Soviet aggression with "massive retaliation." Yet he relied on international treaties and organizations to insure peace, and avoided actions in such hot spots as Vietnam, East Germany, and Hungary. He did, however, fight Communism by covert means, instigating coups in Iran and Guatemala, which were orchestrated by his brother Allen at the CIA. Dulles alienated many with his harsh rhetoric, but Eisenhower defended him, claiming that only "one man I know . . . has seen more of the world . . . and knows more than he does-and that's me."

A Woman’s Work in Sixteenth-Century Paris

Smithsonian Libraries
The patron saint of both printers and brewers is Aurelius Augustine, born in 354 CE in present-day Algeria. He studied and taught philosophy and rhetoric there and in Carthage, Rome more »

Study of Dr. Mott for "Scientific Group"

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
Probably a study for the scientific group, never painted. Man facing towards the right, his right arm behind his back in the rhetorical position. His feet not shown.

The Gettysburg Address

SI Center for Learning and Digital Access
Online exhibit telling the story of the Gettysburg Address by focusing on the last handwritten copy of the speech, a manuscript that usually resides in the Lincoln Bedroom of the White House. Includes background information, printable version of the manuscript, transcripts in English and Spanish, and an interactive document that features actor Liam Neeson reading the address.

German Brewery Pulls Beer Accused of Having Nazi and Anti-Immigrant Sentiments

Smithsonian Magazine

As Europe struggles with a massive influx of refugees and asylum-seekers from parts of the Middle East, the chorus of anti-immigrant rhetoric has gotten louder. Some worry that the language is becoming eerily similar to hateful speech used by the Nazis during their rise to power in the 1930s. Now, a German brewery has pulled one of its beers from the market in the face of accusations that the labeling uses Nazi and anti-immigrant symbolism.

The beer in question is “Grenzzaun halbe,” which translates to “Borderfence Half,” a reference to the ongoing debate of whether to Germany should seal its borders for refugees from countries like Syria, Iraq and Afghanistan, to name a few. The Röhrl Brewery, which made the beer, is located in Bavaria where the debate over asylum-seekers is particularly heated, Alex Swerdloff reports for Munchies.

“When the refugee influx surged, we wanted to point to all of Bavaria’s good and positive traditions, to urge that we please do not forget, despite all willingness to help, what makes our Bavaria beautiful and good,” brewery owner Frank Sillner told the German public broadcaster BR, the Agence France-Presse (AFP) reports.

Germany is one of the most popular places for refugees to seek asylum thanks to its open-door policy towards refugees. Last year alone, more than 1 million refugees entered Germany, mostly through the Bavarian border, sparking tensions among some conservative Germans in the region, the AFP reported in December.

The beer label controversy doesn’t stop with its name. Several customers noticed strange things about the beer’s packaging: it featured chest-thumping phrases and words like “the homeland needs beer,” “protect,” “defend,” “preserve,” “diligence,” “loyalty” and “discipline,” Swerdloff reports.

For many, these echo the nationalism and xenophobia stirred up by Adolf Hitler and the Nazis during the 1930s and World War II. Customers also noticed that the price of the beer was set at €0.88 – a number frequently used by neo-Nazis as code for “Heil Hitler,” as H is the eighth letter of the German alphabet. And round the controversy out, the expiration date listed on the beer bottles was November 9, the anniversary of Kristallnacht, a massive attack on Jews arranged by the Nazi government in 1938, the AFP reports.

Sillner admits that the beer was named in reference to the Bavarian border debate and the larger refugee conflict, but he has vigorously denied any use of Nazi imagery on the bottles, calling the numbers a sheer coincidence. According to Sillner, the price changes once sales tax is applied, and the sell-by date is calculated by a computer program, the AFP reports.

“We have nothing, absolutely nothing, to do with rightwing extremism,” Sillner told German news agencies, according to the AFP.

The Röhrl Brewery has since recalled the controversial beer and apologized for any “hurt feelings.” Though the Nazi symbolism may have been an honest mistake, at a time when xenophobia and anti-immigrant sentiment is on the rise, the beer serves as a timely reminder of the uglier side of European history.

400 lire "Baptism of St. Augustine" single

National Postal Museum
On April 7, 1987, Vatican City issued a series of stamps commemorating the sixteenth centenary of the conversion and baptism of St. Augustine.

St. Augustine (Aurelius Augustine) was born at Thagaste, Numidia (present-day Algeria) on November 13, 354. Although his mother raised him as a Christian, he initially looked upon Christianity with scorn. Educated in Carthage, he went on to teach rhetoric in Rome and Milan. In Milan, St. Ambrose converted him to Christianity, and he was baptized there during the Easter Vigil in 387. Augustine eventually returned to North Africa and was ordained a priest in 391. Five years later, he became bishop of Hippo (present-day Annaba, Algeria).

One of Augustine's most famous works is the "Confession," an account of his life up to the time of his conversion. He also wrote the "City of God," a defense of Christianity that was prompted by Rome's capture by the Goths in 410. Augustine died in Hippo in 430. In 1295, Pope Boniface VIII (d. 1303) declared him a Doctor of the Church. Catholics celebrate his feast day on August 28.

The 400-lire stamp depicts the baptism of St. Augustine, inspired by a painting by Bartolomeo di Gentile (1470-1543) held in the Vatican Picture Gallery.

Along the top of each stamp appear the words POSTE VATICANE, the value, and the inscription S. AGOSTINO 387-1987. The stamps, vertical in format, measure 30 x 40 mm, and have a perforation of 13 1/4 x 14. The Italian State Polygraphic Institute and Mint printed 550,000 complete series on white chalky paper by multicolor rotogravure, and Vatican City issued the stamps in sheets of twenty.

"New Issue." Vatican Notes 35, no. 6 (May 1987): 1, 3.

Poster, “Wines of California”

National Museum of American History
Established in 1938, California’s Wine Advisory Board set out to challenge the widespread attitude—a holdover from the rhetoric of Prohibition—that wine was like all alcoholic beverages and consumed only by those wishing to get drunk. The Board organized various campaigns to convey a different message: that wine could be a positive addition to the American table. Ads and booklets produced during the 1950s and ‘60s reflected this effort, with slogans that encouraged consumers to embrace wine as part of an all-American meal. The Board also commissioned a series of colorful posters in the 1960s to promote California and its reinvigorated wine industry.

This poster produced in the 1960s was one in the “California, Wine Land of America” series based on original artwork by Amado Gonzalez, a Mexican-born artist who taught at San Francisco’s City College. Featuring symbols of the wine industry—bottles of red and white wine, grapes, and rolling vineyards—it also depicts a hand-operated grape press of the kind used by home winemakers and small producers. A figure of Bacchus is shown operating the press with great athletic effort.

Krzysztof Wodiczko on his 1988 Hirshhorn Museum projection

Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden
Coinciding with “Brand New: Art and Commodity in the 1980s,” the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden will present a restaging of “Hirshhorn Museum, Washington, DC, 1988–2000,” the iconic, large-scale outdoor projection by acclaimed artist Krzysztof Wodiczko. One of the most significant public artworks of the 1980s, the celebrated installation first debuted to DC audiences over three nights in October 1988. Commissioned by the Hirshhorn and created by Wodiczko specifically for its uniquely curved building, the projection debuted as part of the Museum’s “WORKS” program, which ran from 1987–1993 and featured a series of temporary, site-specific exhibitions by artists such as Sol LeWitt, Ann Hamilton, Matt Mullican, and Alfredo Jaar. The 68-foot projection spans the building’s three stories and features symbolic images that speak powerfully to socio-political issues of both the 1980s and present-day. While referring to such widespread debates as political rhetoric, reproductive rights, and the death penalty, Hirshhorn Museum, Washington, DC, 1988–2000 also alludes to the power of mass media to convey ideologies.

Krzysztof Wodiczko on symbolism at the Hirshhorn Museum

Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden
Coinciding with “Brand New: Art and Commodity in the 1980s,” the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden will present a restaging of “Hirshhorn Museum, Washington, DC, 1988–2000,” the iconic, large-scale outdoor projection by acclaimed artist Krzysztof Wodiczko (b. Warsaw, Poland, 1943). One of the most significant public artworks of the 1980s, the celebrated installation first debuted to DC audiences over three nights in October 1988. Commissioned by the Hirshhorn and created by Wodiczko specifically for its uniquely curved building, the projection debuted as part of the Museum’s “WORKS” program, which ran from 1987–1993 and featured a series of temporary, site-specific exhibitions by artists such as Sol LeWitt, Ann Hamilton, Matt Mullican, and Alfredo Jaar. The 68-foot projection spans the building’s three stories and features symbolic images that speak powerfully to socio-political issues of both the 1980s and present-day. While referring to such widespread debates as political rhetoric, reproductive rights, and the death penalty, Hirshhorn Museum, Washington, DC, 1988–2000 also alludes to the power of mass media to convey ideologies.

An[n]otationes et quaestiones logicae

Smithsonian Libraries
Imperfect copy: lacks p. 161-2 (replaced with p. 179-[180]), p. 173-4, and p. 177-8

Smithsonian Institution Libraries. Manuscripts of the Dibner collection, 30

Also available online

Also available online.

Collected by Bern Dibner for his Burndy Library in Norwalk, Connecticut, founded in 1941. Donated to the Smithsonian Libraries in 1974 by Dibner DSI

Elecresource

Notes on philosophical and scientific subjects, including logic, rhetoric, and poetics
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