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Found 21,254 Resources

Postal Reply Card

National Postal Museum
2 cent + 2 cent postal reply cards, unsevered

blue

Postal announcement

National Postal Museum
Thurn & Taxis postal announcement by Emperor Ferdinand III.

Postal Uniform Preservation Project

National Postal Museum
By Manda Kowalczyk, Preservation Specialist Happy Preservation Week! Founded in 2010 by the American Libraries Association (ALA) to bring awareness to the need for preservation of collections in libraries, museums and other cultural institutions, this year’s Preservation Week theme focuses on textile preservation. Although we have a large philatelic collection at the National Postal Museum, we also care for vehicles, a dog and objects worn by postal workers like badges, mailbags and uniforms! Recently we acquired a uniform consisting of a shirt and trousers worn by Vivian Campbell who was a sales and associate clerk at the Peach Springs Post...

Postal alliance

Smithsonian Libraries

National Postal Museum Interns Examine Different Facets of Postal History

National Postal Museum
By Ren Cooper Last summer, the National Postal Museum was fortunate enough to host two fantastic interns – Aleida Fernandez and Ellyse Stauffer – who worked over the course of three months with curator and historian Nancy Pope. Each had their own research project, which resulted in interesting and informative articles currently featured on the National Postal Museum’s website. Anthony Comstock, 1844-1915 Aleida Fernandez delved into the rich history of the Anthony Comstock’s various crusades against “vice.” In her own words: “In the second half of the 19th century, New York City was a battleground between pious reformers and the...

19c Domestic Postal Card

National Postal Museum
HISTORIC PRESERVATION SERIES. 19-cent postal card honoring the Washington National Cathedral. Printed on the sheet-fed, high speed, Roland Man 800, five color, offset press. Designed by Howard Koslow. UPSS S179.

On January 6, 1893, the United States Congress granted a charter to the Protestant Episcopal Cathedral Foundation of the District of Columbia. The charter empowered it to establish a cathedral and institutions of learning. The Congressional charter was signed by President Benjamin Harrison.

The Cathedral's foundation stone was laid on September 29, 1907. In 1912, Bethlehem Chapel opened for services. Other areas continued to be constructed until September 1990, when the Cathedral was completed.*

* Excerpt from Washington National Cathedral souvenir program

postal card

National Museum of American History

postal card

National Museum of American History

postal card

National Museum of American History

postal card

National Museum of American History

postal card

National Museum of American History

postal cover

National Museum of American History

postal card

National Museum of American History

postal card

National Museum of American History

postal card

National Museum of American History

card, postal

National Museum of American History

Postal inspector chest badge

National Postal Museum
U.S. Postal Inspection Service chest badge with vertical tension pin and clasp on verso. Six-pointed star encompasses circular medallion with eagle and shield emblem. Upper portion of medallion marked "U.S. POST OFFICE DEPT."; lower portion inscribed "INSPECTOR."

Although it is one of the oldest law enforcement agencies in the country, the Postal Inspection Service did not issue badges until the 1900s. Postal inspectors wore the star-shaped badge, like the one shown, until the early 1970s. This badge beloned to Post Office Inspector Dana F. Angier.

Postal Scale

National Museum of American History

1c Liberty postal card

National Postal Museum
1-cent Liberty postal card. Watermark, "USPOD" large on verso. This issue was printed in sheets of 36 from steel engraved plates manufactured by the National Bank Note Company. UPSS S1.

Postal Inspector "Raid" badge

National Postal Museum
U.S. Postal Inspection Service chest badge, number 6897, with vertical hinged pin and safety clasp on verso. Gold shield with spread eagle pediment surmounting raised crest with United States Post Office emblem. Upper portion of shield marked "INSPECTOR" on raised banner.

Although it is one of the oldest law enforcement agencies in the country, the Postal Inspection Service did not issue badges until the 1900s. The 'raid' badge, like the one shown, was created because it was hard to display the smaller, official badge when charging through a door on a raid. It was issued to inspectors after 1973.

Postal money order

National Postal Museum
On March 1, 1943, Josephes Flanagan purchased this postal money order, serial number 2, in the amount of twenty-five cents payable to himself. The money order, obtained from the Waukegan, Illinois, Great Lakes Branch, Unit No. 1, bears no indication that it was cashed. As both payee and remitter, Flanagan retained both this money order and its detached receipt (Museum ID 2000.2010.2).

Postal money order

National Postal Museum
Specimen postal money order of the type issued in 1894 is marked from the Newburg, New York office and bears the number 14312.

The design of postal money order forms stayed the same from 1864 to 1893. Officials changed the domestic forms in 1893 and again in 1894 in efforts to improve efficiency and security. Beginning in September 1893 the payee's name was included on the original form; previously it had been only on the separate advice. The addition cleared up questions of ownership and how the form should be endorsed.

In early 1894 the Post Office Department sent money-order offices new books of forms that were to be in place by the time the January 24, 1894 legislation took effect on July 1 of that year. "In April, 1894," explained the Postmaster General's Annual Report of 1896, "a domestic money-order form of a new and handsome design was introduced, shaped like a bank draft, and therefore better suited to commercial usage than the form previously used. The old form was printed upon ordinary paper by the surface-printing process, while the new order is reproduced by lithography upon bond paper of an excellent quality, which is tented by the same method, improving the general appearance of the order and forming a safeguard against attempts at alterations and erasures (182)." The new form also included a coupon that was added to assist postmasters and with accounting procedures, but it never proved practical and in part lead to another redesign in 1899.

References:

Annual Report of the Postmaster General for the Fiscal Year Ended June 30, 1894.

Annual Report of the Postmaster General for the Fiscal Year Ended June 30, 1895.

Annual Report of the Postmaster General for the Fiscal Year Ended June 30, 1896.

Annual Report of the Postmaster General for the Fiscal Year Ended June 30, 1899.

DeBlois, Diane. "Money Order: The Birth of a 'War Baby.'" P.S.: A Quarterly Journal of Postal History 7:2 (1985): 36-56.

Postal money order

National Postal Museum
Specimen postal money order of the type issued in 1894 is marked from the Philadelphia, Pennsylvania receiving station number 7 and bears the number 694.

The design of postal money order forms stayed the same from 1864 to 1893. Officials changed the domestic forms in 1893 and again in 1894 in efforts to improve efficiency and security. Beginning in September 1893 the payee's name was included on the original form; previously it had been only on the separate advice. The addition cleared up questions of ownership and how the form should be endorsed.

In early 1894 the Post Office Department sent money-order offices new books of forms that were to be in place by the time the January 24, 1894 legislation took effect on July 1 of that year. "In April, 1894," explained the Postmaster General's Annual Report of 1896, "a domestic money-order form of a new and handsome design was introduced, shaped like a bank draft, and therefore better suited to commercial usage than the form previously used. The old form was printed upon ordinary paper by the surface-printing process, while the new order is reproduced by lithography upon bond paper of an excellent quality, which is tented by the same method, improving the general appearance of the order and forming a safeguard against attempts at alterations and erasures (182)." The new form also included a coupon that was added to assist postmasters and with accounting procedures, but it never proved practical and in part lead to another redesign in 1899.

References:

Annual Report of the Postmaster General for the Fiscal Year Ended June 30, 1894.

Annual Report of the Postmaster General for the Fiscal Year Ended June 30, 1895.

Annual Report of the Postmaster General for the Fiscal Year Ended June 30, 1896.

Annual Report of the Postmaster General for the Fiscal Year Ended June 30, 1899.

DeBlois, Diane. "Money Order: The Birth of a 'War Baby.'" P.S.: A Quarterly Journal of Postal History 7:2 (1985): 36-56.

Postal inspector chest badge

National Postal Museum
U.S. Postal Inspection Service chest badge, number 687, with vertical hinged pin and safety clasp on verso. Gold shield with spread eagle pediment surmounting raised crest with United States Post Office emblem. Upper portion of shield marked "INSPECTOR" on raised banner.

Although it is one of the oldest law enforcement agencies in the country, the Postal Inspection Service did not issue badges until the 1900s. The miniature shield badge, like the one shown, was issued to inspectors after 1973. Unlike the 'raid' badge, it would mount in or on a credential case along with the inspector's identification card.
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