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Portrait Gallery Highlights, Spring 2016

National Portrait Gallery
A recap of 2016, so far, at the Smithsonian's National Portrait Gallery. The Smithsonian's National Portrait Gallery tells the history of America through individuals who have shaped its culture. Through the visual arts, performing arts and new media, the Portrait Gallery portrays poets and presidents, visionaries and villains, actors and activists whose lives tell the American story.

"Portraits Alive!" 2015

National Portrait Gallery
The Portraits Alive! program is a dynamic combination of history, visual art, and performance art. Local teens lead a theatrical tour that brings the Portrait Gallery's collection to life through original, student-written performances. This program has been made possible through the generous support of the Honorable Richard Blumenthal and Mrs. Cynthia M. Blumenthal, Capital Group Companies Charitable Foundation, and the Reinsch Family Education Endowment. Video Produced by Brittany Jordan Cole, New Media Intern Music: "Feel Good (Instrumental)" by Broke for Free: http://freemusicarchive.org/music/Broke_For_Free/ Used under Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives (aka Music Sharing) License.

Katharine Hepburn, Oscars & Portrait -- National Portrait Gallery

National Portrait Gallery
Historian Amy Henderson discusses Katherine Hepburn's Oscars and portrait by Everett Raymond Kinstler. In 2009, the National Portrait Gallery acquired Hepburns four Oscar statuettes as a gift from the Katharine Hepburn estate. They are now on view in the Twentieth-Century Americans gallery on the museums third floor, next to a 1982 portrait of Hepburn by artist Everett Raymond Kinstler, which she termed her favorite. Hepburn won Best Actress Academy Awards for "Morning Glory," 1933; "Guess Whos Coming to Dinner," 1967; "The Lion in Winter," 1968; and "On Golden Pond, 1981." Learn more about Hepburn by visiting the online exhibition for "KATE: A Centennial Celebration. ( http://npg.si.edu/exhibit/hepburn ) This exhibition was on view at the National Portrait Gallery from November 2, 2007, to September 28, 2008.

Portrait of Walt Whitman, National Portrait Gallery

National Portrait Gallery
Walt Whitman's experiences in Washington are at the very core of his poetry and his journals. After his brother George was wounded at Fredericksburg in December of 1862, Walt Whitman came south from Manhattan and began work as a volunteer. He spent time with soldiers recovering in the Patent Office Building (now home to the National Portrait Gallery and Smithsonian American Art Museum), which had been converted into a hospital for much of the Civil War. In this video, Warren Perry, researcher and playwright at the National Portrait Gallery, reads Walt Whitman. Perry's play "Swift to My Wounded: Walt Whitman and the Civil War" was recently published by the National Portrait Gallery. It is available through the museum shop: http://www.npg.si.edu/shop/shopcafe.html

Tommy Lasorda Portrait Dedication Ceremony, National Portrait Gallery

National Portrait Gallery
The Smithsonian's National Portrait Gallery installed a portrait of Tommy Lasorda, Hall of Fame manager of the Los Angeles Dodgers Tuesday, Sept. 22. Painted by artist Everett Raymond Kinstler, the life-sized portrait measures 60 by 50 inches and was commissioned to commemorate Lasordas legacy as part of the Dodgers organization. Sept. 22 was Lasordas 82nd birthday and the first night of a three-game series between the Dodgers and the Washington Nationals in Washington, D.C. The portrait is on view in the museums exhibition New Arrivals on the first floor through Nov. 15, 2009. After a brief Major League career as a left-handed pitcher for the Brooklyn Dodgers, Lasorda became one of the most enthusiastic and successful managers in baseball history. In his 20-year career as the Dodgers manager, Lasorda led the team to eight division titles and two World Championships. After his retirement, he became a Dodgers executive, and this year marks his 60th season with the Dodger organization and his fifth year as special advisor to the chairman. Lasorda was elected to the National Baseball Hall of Fame in 1997, and he managed the U.S. team to its first-ever baseball gold medal at the 2000 Sydney Olympics. Kinstler has painted more than 1,200 portraits of well-known personalities and public figures. The Portrait Gallerys collection includes paintings and sketches of Katharine Hepburn, Tony Bennett, Richard Nixon, Norman Rockwell and Ruth Bader Ginsburg. Lasorda sat for the portrait at Kinstlers National Arts Club studio in New York City in June 2009. The portrait is a gift from friends of Lasorda. For more on Tommy Lasordas portrait, see the National Portrait Gallerys blog at: http://face2face.si.edu/my_weblog/2009/09/tommy-lasorda-joins-the-collection-of-the-national-portrait-gallery-.html Image info: Thomas Charles Lasorda / Everett Raymond Kinstler / Oil on canvas / National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Institution

Outwin Boochever Portrait Competition 2009, National Portrait Gallery

National Portrait Gallery
Footage from the Outwin Boochever Portrait Competition 2009, awards ceremony, October 22, 2009. The works in the Portrait Competition will be on display at the National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Institution, until August 22, 2010. To view images of the works, see http://http://www.portraitcompetition.si.edu Dave Woody of Fort Collins, Colorado, has received first prize in the National Portrait Gallerys 2009 Outwin Boochever Portrait Competition. His photograph, titled Laura (shown on right), was chosen as the winner from a field of more than three thousand entries in every visual arts medium. First prize was a cash award of $25,000 and a commission from the museum to portray a remarkable living American for the NPG permanent collection. Woodys portrait, as well as works from forty-eight other artists, are on display at the National Portrait Gallery, in the Outwin Boochever Portrait Competition exhibition on the second floor. Of his work, Woody comments, I am never really attracted to photographing subjects who are totally self-aware or self-confident, as Im more interested in those people who move through this world with a quiet grace. Spending time with friends allows me to see them in a certain light where their mask drops and something soft and inviting is seen, and Ill think of making a photograph of them. Stanley Rayfield of Richmond, Virginia, received second prize for a painting titled Dad, while third place went to Adam Vinson of Jenkintown, Pennsylvania for his oil-on-panel painting titled Dressy Bessy Takes a Nap. Commended artists are Margaret Bowland, for a her painting Portrait of Kenyetta and Brianna; Yolanda del Amo, for her C-print photograph Sarah, David; Gaela Erwin, for her pastel on paper Baptismal Self-Portrait; and Emil Robinson for an oil-on-panel portrait titled Showered. Each was awarded a cash prize. Finalists for the 2009 competition were chosen in early May, and the winners were announced at the Outwin Boochever Portrait Competition Awards Celebration on Thursday, October 22. In addition, one exhibiting artist will win the Peoples Choice Award, in which visitors to the exhibition, both online and in the gallery, may cast a vote for their favorite of the forty-nine finalists. Voting for the Peoples Choice Award will close on January 18, 2010. The competition is named for Virginia Outwin Boochever, a former NPG docent and an ardent supporter of the Portrait Gallery. The exhibitions catalog describes Mrs. Boochevers endowment for the portrait competition as a way to benefit artists directly as a unique opportunity to fill a void in the American art world.

Pedro Martinez, portrait presentation ceremony, National Portrait Gallery

National Portrait Gallery
Pedro Martinez, portrait presentation ceremony, National Portrait Gallery, March 25, 2011. Portrait by artist Susan Miller-Havens. The Smithsonian's National Portrait Gallery has recently acquired a painting of Pedro Martinez; this is the first image of the Major League Baseball pitcher in the collection. The museum installed the portrait on March 25,2011 in its "Recent Acquisitions" exhibition. The archived webcast of the presentaton ceremony can be viewed here. Born in the Dominican Republic and an American citizen since 2006, Martinez was impressive in his debut for the Los Angeles Dodgers in September 1992. He had been told that he was too small to be a major-league power pitcher, yet from his first appearance he consistently overpowered the best hitters in the world. Martinez won three Cy Young Awards (1997, 1999, 2000) in a span of four seasons and to date has a record of 219 wins and only 100 losses. In 2000, the very heart of the home-run/steroid era, he had an earned-run average of 1.74—more than three runs a game less than the American League average; he allowed only seventeen home runs in 217 innings pitched. Martinez will always be remembered for the seven-year period when he established, in the words of baseball commentator Peter Gammons, "the most dominant stretch of any pitcher in baseball history." He is an eight-time All Star who has pitched for five teams in his career, most recently with the Philadelphia Phillies. In addition, Martinez was a member of the World Series--winning Boston Red Sox in 2004, the first Red Sox team to win a championship in eighty-six years. "We are thrilled to include this portrait of Pedro Martinez in the National Portrait Gallery's collection," said Martin Sullivan, director of the museum. "Martinez is widely recognized as one of the great Major League Baseball pitchers who also is concerned for the well-being of his larger community." The portrait was created by Susan Miller-Havens in 2000 with oil and beeswax on Baltic birch, and measures 57 inches by 21 inches. Miller-Havens is a contemporary American painter who has depicted a number of prominent athletes, in addition to creating other figurative pieces. This is the second of three portraits of Martinez that she created in her Cambridge, Massachusetts, studio. Miller-Havens titled this portrait El Orgullo y Determinación (Pride and Determination) as a statement of Martinez's accomplishment in overcoming obstacles and becoming one of the most dominant pitchers of baseball's modern era. The Portrait Gallery's collection includes another painting by the artist of former Major League Baseball catcher Carlton Fisk. The portrait of Martinez is a gift to the museum from Gloria Trowbridge Gammons and Peter Warren Gammons in honor of Martinez, whose baseball career is paralleled by his lifelong work promoting educational opportunities for less fortunate children in America and his own Dominican Republic.

Norman Mineta, Portrait Presentation, National Portrait Gallery

National Portrait Gallery
Former Transportation and Commerce Secretary Norman Y. Mineta was recognized by the Smithsonian's National Portrait Gallery and the Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Program with the installation of his portrait in a private ceremony at the Portrait Gallery on Monday, July 26. The portrait, by artist Everett Raymond Kinstler, is on display on the museum's first floor, in the "New Arrivals" exhibition, a collection of recent acquisitions. The oil-on-canvas painting was offered as a gift to the Portrait Gallery from the Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Program. Born in 1931 to immigrant Japanese parents in San José, California, Mineta and his family were detained along with 120,000 Americans of Japanese descent at an internment camp during World War II. Mineta's career in politics began with an appointment to a vacant seat on the San José City Council in 1967; two years later he won the seat in his own right. In 1971, he was elected mayor of San José, becoming the first Asian American mayor of a major U.S. city. As a member of Congress from 1975 through 1995, Mineta co-founded the Congressional Asian Pacific American Caucus and engineered the passage of H.R. 442, the Civil Liberties Act of 1988—an official government apology for the internment of those of Japanese ancestry during World War II. In 2000, President Bill Clinton appointed Mineta secretary of commerce, making him the first Asian Pacific American to hold a cabinet post. In 2001, President George W. Bush appointed him secretary of transportation, making him the only Democrat in Bush's cabinet and one of the few citizens ever to serve in the cabinet of both a Democratic and Republican president. During the tragic events of Sept. 11, 2001, Mineta issued the historic order to ground all civilian aircraft, the first time this had been done in U.S. history. Mineta retired from his cabinet post in 2006 and in that same year was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the nation's highest civilian award. Mineta also served on the Smithsonian's Board of Regents from 1979 through 1995 and supported the establishment of the Smithsonian Asian Pacific American program in 1997. Currently, he is vice chairman of Hill & Knowlton, a leading global communications consultancy. This commission was made possible through the support of benefactors George and Sakaye Aratani, Hill & Knowlton, and Verizon Communications with additional support from many others. The portrait of Mineta is a part of the National Portrait Gallery's ongoing efforts to commission portraits of living sitters for its permanent collection.

Lucretia Mott, Daguerreotype Portrait

National Portrait Gallery
Ann Shumard, Senior Curator of Photography at the Smithsonian's National Portrait Gallery, discusses an 1851 daguerreotype portrait of Lucretia Coffin Mott. Lucretia Mott's commitment to ending slavery and securing rights for women became the defining features of her life. A devout Quaker whose activism proved unsettling to some members of her faith, Mott assumed a highly visible role in the abolitionist movement. After joining William Lloyd Garrison at the launch of the American Anti-Slavery Society in 1833, she helped to found Philadelphia's Female Anti-Slavery Society. Her concern for women's rights was a natural outgrowth of her abolitionist efforts, and in 1848. Mott and Elizabeth Cady Stanton organized the convention at Seneca Falls, New York, that gave birth to the women's suffrage movement.

Portrait

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
Portrait of George Washington with an eagle bearing a shield flanked by laurel branches.

Portrait

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
Woven portrait of Napoleon I (1769-1821) of France.

Portrait

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
Portrait of Marie Antoinette in oval wooden frame. Gregoire velvet in shades of brown and blue.

Portrait

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
Portrait of Princess de Lamballe in a Gregoire velvet.

Portrait

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
Portrait of "Innocence" by Greuze in Gregoire velvet technique executed by H. Erquez. "Innocence" is depicted with a lamb under her arm.

Portrait

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
Portrait of Luise Auguste Wilhelmine Amalie, Queen of Prussia (1776-1810) in velvet.

Portrait

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
Black and white portrait of Karl Marx (1818 – 1883). Chinese inscription in lower border.

Portrait

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
Black and white portrait of Frederich Engels (1820 – 1895). Chinese inscription at bottom.

Portrait

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
Black and white portrait of Vladimir Ilyich Lenin (1870 – 1924). Chinese inscription in bottom border.

Portrait

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
Black and white portrait of Josef Stalin (1879 – 1953). Chinese inscription in bottom border.

Portrait

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
Portrait of the Madonna.

Portrait

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
Woven portrait of Philippe de la Salle (1723-1803), after a portrait by De Boissieu (1736-1810) and woven by Louis Reybaud.

Portrait

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
Jacquard woven portrait of Franklin Roosevelt (1882-1945) designed by M. Buchman at weaving school, Lyon, France.

Portrait

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
Woven portrait of the Duc d'Orléans (1810-1842) of France.

Portrait

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
Portrait of Louis XVI in an oval wooden frame. Gregoire velvet in shades of brown and red.
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