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Everyday philanthropists

National Museum of American History

bucket from the Ice Bucket Challenge. A collection box from the 19th century. A toolbelt from a volunteer with Habitat for Humanity. All these objects tell the story of how we give and receive, how we engage in philanthropy.

An alms box, a mop bucket, and a tool belt.

Sometimes the story is obvious when you look at the artifact—for instance, a March of Dimes donation tin. How you give, what organization you're giving to, and what that organization does with your gift are written on the tin. However, it isn't always this obvious.

A tin with a slot in the top for coins. The side of the can reads "Give to the March of Dimes. Prevent Birth Defects."

In anticipation of #GivingTuesday, I explored how objects can help us understand the many different ways Americans give. In the process, I learned both the stories in our collections and the stories of my colleagues. Many of those stories were right around me.

One of the artifacts that caught my eye was this World War I poster for the Crispus Attucks Circle. What was this circle, and what did a Revolutionary War figure have to do with World War I?

A poster featuring an African American man in combat, with advertisements for the Crispus Attucks Circle

During World War I, African Americans in Philadelphia were concerned that returning black soldiers in Philadelphia would not receive the same level of medical care as their white counterparts. Determined to address this issue, they created the Crispus Attucks Circle —named for an African American man considered the first casualty of the American Revolution—to raise money for a local African American hospital. The poster helped advertise their efforts

Mireya Loza, a curator in the Division of Work and Industry, shared an incredible story tied to an unassuming object.

An open bank passbook.

 

It’s a little bank book issued to my father in the ’80s for an account he opened up for a hometown association that was raising money for this little village in Guanajuato, Mexico.

The village had this tiny adobe church that was falling apart. My father had this idea that they really had to replace it with a brick and mortar structure and that the migrant community in Chicago could do that.

 

A photograph showing an empty landscape and a group of people on tractors.

He got together a couple of folks from that village and started a discussion: How would they tackle raising funds to rebuild this church? They decided that they'd do two things: they'd pay dues and they'd throw parties. They basically charged a cover. People cooked, and folks could come in and eat, dance, and basically have a makeshift baile—a dance. They raised the funds across four to five years, and the church was ultimately constructed.

A man sits in a chair.

I think it's an extraordinary example of working class and working poor folks really engaging and serving their community in philanthropy. And they're doing it one dollar at a time. When I was a kid, the kind of project that my dad took on to build this church was quite common. When you're in a particular moment you don't necessarily see the historical significance.

Loza's words stuck with me—there's historical significance in all of our lives. When I hear the word "philanthropist," the first thing that comes to mind is a wealthy benefactor donating millions. However, we can all be philanthropists—making a difference internationally or in our communities. When we give, we shape history.

To be a philanthropist, you don't have to give millions—you can give a little bit of money, or none at all. Philanthropists also help by sharing their time and talents.

Ken Kimery, the executive producer of the Smithsonian Jazz Masterworks Orchestra and the supervisory producer of American Music History Initiatives, exemplifies this.

Ken Kimery sits behind his drum set.

As a musician, I donate my time and talent through concerts in the museum, outside the museum, educational programs, and more.

One of the moments that I recall was in 2008. The full orchestra was on a pretty extensive tour to Egypt. We insisted that the concerts and what we did during this tour not only benefit those who had the capacity to buy tickets but those who did not have the means. We presented a concert in the Cairo Opera House for orphans. That, to me, was such a highlight—being able to have an impact outside the small community that I live with here in Washington, D.C., was really powerful.

The Smithsonian Jazz Masterworks Orchestra in Egypt, in front of the pyramids.

As I've been getting to know the museum's collection, I've been discovering objects that tell all sorts of stories of people who have donated their talent and their time—sometimes in very creative ways.

A bronze colored plaque that shows the marks of age.

A modest plaque reveals a story about arborists who used the bicentennial of the Constitution to raise awareness about environmental concerns. How? They donated their time researching and locating trees that had been standing when the Constitution was signed and placed a plaque on each in order to raise awareness.

Jane Rogers, a curator in the Division of Culture and Arts, also donated her time. Rogers served as a volunteer EMT and firefighter from 1990 to 1995.

A young woman in firefighting gear holds a toddler wearing a large firefighting hat.

At the fire department where I started, in order to become a firefighter you had to be an EMT first. When a volunteer would join the department, they would be sent to training.

A firefighting helmet, patches, a stethoscope and blood pressure cuff.

While taking my EMT training course, anytime I saw a free arm, I was like, "Can I take your blood pressure?" It's really hard to do, so I bought the stethoscope and the blood pressure cuff to practice. After training, I carried those all the time, every time I went on the ambulance.

I would volunteer for one day—five hours a week. During the summer we would participate in parades, and at Christmas we would man the fire truck with Santa. The training and service took up a lot of time. For a young mother, it was a lot. But now that my kids are grown up, I am thinking of volunteering again.

A lot of times, people think of volunteer firefighters as running into burning buildings with no thought to themselves. But you don't really think like that. There is always that danger in the back of your mind. In the end you just really want to make sure people in your community are safe, so the risk is worth it.

People engage in philanthropy in so many ways, donating their money as well as their time and talent. Objects like these can help us connect to and better understand the different ways people give.

Do you give your time, talent, or treasure? Are you a philanthropist? What objects help tell your story?

 

Amelia Grabowski is a social media and blog assistant focusing on business and philanthropy history. 

You can share the story of how you give through our #AmericanGiving activity.

The Philanthropy Initiative is made possible by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation and David M. Rubenstein, with additional support by the Fidelity Charitable Trustees' Initiative, a grantmaking program of Fidelity Charitable.

Posted Date: 
Tuesday, November 21, 2017 - 10:30
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When philanthropists convinced people to save lives

National Museum of American History

Young Charles Taylor drowned in June 1818. He was six years, seven months, and 10 days old, the son of Nathan and Sally Taylor. While a painting would keep only the sacred memory of his short life alive, American philanthropists and their associates abroad were working to keep others at risk of drowning alive in body and soul.

A watercolor painting of two parents, dressed in morning clothing, leaning on the grave of their child (Charles Taylor)This watercolor was painted by Joseph Ayer in Peru, New York. The inscription reads: Sacred to the Memory of /Charles Taylor, /Son of Nathan & Sally Taylor, /Drowned June 21, /A.D.1818,. Aetatas (sic). 6 yrs. 7 mo. 10 days.

Saving drowning victims was a new charitable cause in the late 1700s. The movement began in Amsterdam in 1767 when a group of men created a society to rescue and resuscitate people from drowning—a common problem due to the city's many canals. Over the next decades, the idea spread, largely through the networks of medical men, around Europe, the British Isles, the Caribbean, and North America. In Britain, the charities promoting the rescue and resuscitation of victims of drowning and certain other types of accidents were typically known by the name "humane society," and that was the term Americans generally used too, long before it was used to refer to animal welfare organizations.

Americans began establishing humane societies in the 1780s. The first was set up in Philadelphia in 1780, the second in Boston in 1786; John Adams, John Hancock, and Paul Revere were among the members. People in Baltimore, Maryland; Charleston, South Carolina; Newburyport, Massachusetts; New York City, New York; Wilmington, Delaware; and elsewhere followed suit, although not all the groups flourished. Following the British model, the organizations worked by offering rewards of money, medals, or certificates to those who rescued or resuscitated drowning victims. They printed and disseminated information about the most up-to-date resuscitation methods, in public places along waterways, in newspapers, and elsewhere. They also shared stories about successes, and challenges, in annual reports and newspapers.

A silver medal engraved with a crest featuring boats and enclasped hands, the edge reads Humane Society of Massachusetts, Refuge, 1791The Humane Society of Massachusetts bestowed this medal on a rescuer named Henry Austin Whitney "for courage and presence of mind for rescuing his mother and niece from drowning at Windsor Lock, Conn., October 30, 1852."

Only well-to-do white men served as trustees of the charities, but many others contributed time and effort to the cause. Most rescuers and most rescued people were laboring men or boys. African Americans were among the rescued and rescuers, and monetary rewards to them or for saving their lives were comparable to those for white rescuers and white lives. Women and girls aided in caring for people dragged from the water. Even very young children sometimes raised the alarm that someone was at risk of drowning. In a maritime world where many people could not swim, a watery grave was an ever-present danger, and saving lives entailed the involvement of many.

Along with relying on broad participation, the humane society movement fostered innovations. The Massachusetts Humane Society added a new dimension to its lifesaving endeavors by building huts along the state's coast to provide shelter for shipwrecked mariners. The transatlantic movement as a whole nurtured improvements in resuscitation techniques, with methods ranging from warming bodies, applying friction, and injecting tobacco smoke to administering chest compression. The societies printed information about the newest therapies and exchanged their materials to learn from one another. Humane societies also encouraged the development and improvement of lifesaving equipment such as life vests and lifeboats. Moreover, they pioneered in suicide prevention by focusing attention on self-destruction as a cause for some drowning incidents. In addition to the societies' efforts to recover would-be suicides from water and to resuscitate them as needed, clergymen involved with the movement ministered to suicidal souls who had been stopped in attempts to end their lives. In time, as their understandings of and approach to suicide evolved, members of the Massachusetts Humane Society led the formation of New England's first hospital devoted to mental health, eventually known as McLean Hospital.

A patent model of a wooden boat.Patent model for a lifeboat, developed by Joseph Francis, 1841. Humane societies helped spark interest in building and improving lifeboats. Joseph Francis, who grew up in Massachusetts where attention to lifeboat technology was strong, was a noted builder of lifeboats in the 1800s.

Not all aspects of the cause succeeded. Some of the movement's techniques, such as tobacco enemas administered by bellows, are now rejected. Conditions at the mental hospitals, created in part due to the movement's support, drew censure in the 1800s and since. Yet by encouraging the contributions and innovations of many, humane societies' supporters worked to make the world safer in hopes that others would not suffer the heartache that Charles Taylor's parents did.

Amanda B. Moniz is the David M. Rubenstein Curator of Philanthropy in the Division of Home and Community Life.

The Philanthropy Initiative is made possible by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation and David M. Rubenstein, with additional support by the Fidelity Charitable Trustees' Initiative, a grantmaking program of Fidelity Charitable.

The National Suicide Prevention Lifeline is 1-800-273-8255.

Posted Date: 
Monday, June 25, 2018 - 10:00
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These Signature Artifacts Embody the Giving Spirt of Artist-Philanthropists

Smithsonian Magazine
From Misty Copeland to Lin-Manuel Miranda, a new Smithsonian display spotlights creators who have shaped communities

Elizabeth Keckley: Businesswoman and philanthropist

National Museum of American History

This month, we've been exploring how American women made their place in the marketplace by participating in business and consumption. Recently, we shared the story of Brownie Wise, the woman who spearheaded Tupperware's now famous home-sales model. Wise's work gave generations of Americans (many of whom would have otherwise been shut out of the market) the opportunity to start their own business. Today's post profiles Elizabeth Keckley, a remarkable 19th century African American businesswoman.

Printed portrait of Elizabeth Keckley included in her autobiography "Behind the Scenes"

Although dressmaker Elizabeth Keckley is usually remembered for her close relationship with First Lady Mary Todd Lincoln, the story of her life and career gives us a rare glimpse into the entwined histories of African American business, religion, and philanthropy in 19th-century America.

Born a slave in Virginia in 1818, Elizabeth Keckley learned how to sew from her mother. When her financially strapped owners relocated to St. Louis, Missouri, in the 1840s, Keckley was hired out as a seamstress. While most of Keckley's wages were collected by her owner, she gradually built a reputation as a talented dressmaker. Keckley took great pride in her work, later writing in her autobiography, Behind the Scenes, that the "best ladies in St. Louis were my patrons, and when my reputation was once established I never lacked for orders. With my needle I kept bread in the mouths of seventeen persons for two years and five months."

Photograph of purple dress worn by First Lady Mary Todd Lincoln

In 1855, after years of negotiations, Keckley was able to purchase her and her son's freedom. For the first time in her life, Keckley had the ability to live and work where she wished, and in 1860 she relocated with her family to Washington, D.C. On the eve of the Civil War, the nation's capital was the home of a large and growing free black population, including a vibrant community of African American seamstresses. Despite the competition, Keckley quickly gained a reputation as a gifted dressmaker among the city's white elites. Her client list included some of the city's most prominent families Varina Davis, future First Lady of the Confederacy, was one of her first regular customers. In 1861, Keckley secured a coveted position as personal dressmaker, or modiste, to Mary Todd Lincoln. As the war raged on, she became one of the First Lady's closest confidantes.

Photograph of christening grown created by Elizabeth Keckley

Keckley's business created opportunities for many other African American women. Just before she arrived in Washington in 1860, Keckley had tried but failed to train a group of female assistants for a shop in Baltimore, Maryland. In her words, Keckley had stopped for "six weeks, attempting to realize a sum of money by forming classes of young colored women, and teaching them my system of cutting and fitting dresses...[but the] scheme was not successful, for after six weeks of labor and vexation, I left Baltimore with scarcely money enough to pay my fare to Washington." Buoyed by her relationship with Mary Todd Lincoln as well as the general need for labor in wartime Washington, Keckley's business succeeded where her previous efforts had stumbled. By 1865, Keckley employed almost 20 women in her 12th Street shop.

Photograph of fugitive slaves crossing the Rappahannock River on a wagon with Union soldiers.

Beyond employing other women, Keckley used her success as a business owner as a platform for philanthropy. Wartime Washington faced a protracted refugee crisis. Seizing on the rare opportunity for escape that the war provided, tens of thousands of enslaved men and women crossed Union lines. By 1863, approximately 10,000 refugees had reached the nation's capital. While these men and women had secured their freedom, many struggled to survive in makeshift camps and tenements. Moved by these refugees' plight, in 1862 Keckley joined with 40 other members of the 15th Street Presbyterian Church to found the Ladies' Contraband Relief Association. Keckley served as the association's president and used her privileged position as Mary Todd Lincoln's traveling companion to rally support for the association's efforts.

While accompanying the First Lady on a trip in 1862, Keckley organized mass meetings at churches in Boston and New York City to support the relief association. In addition to numerous contributions from the president and his wife, Keckley collected money from British anti-slavery societies and abolitionist luminaries like Wendell Phillips, Leonard Grimes, and Frederick Douglass. In her autobiography, Keckley recorded these famous men's contributions and, with equal pride, detailed the anonymous support that the association received from black communities throughout the North. More than "eighty large boxes of goods" were "contributed exclusively by the colored people of Boston," reported Keckley, and the "colored help" in New York's Metropolitan Hotel raised "quite a sum of money" to assist former slaves in Washington.

Cover page of Elizabeth Keckley's autobiography, "Behind the Scenes"

Sadly, Keckley and Mary Todd Lincoln's relationship soured in the years after the war. Although Keckley had published her autobiography, Behind the Scenes, in part to defend the former First Lady against her critics in the press, Lincoln and many other members of Washington's elite felt that the book represented a breach of trust. Fallout from the book seriously harmed Keckley's business, but she continued to work as a dressmaker in the nation's capital for decades afterward. And she continued to teach others her trade. In 1892, at the age of 74, Keckley accepted a position as the head of the Department of Sewing and Domestic Science Arts at Ohio's Wilberforce University, one of the nation's first black universities.

Years later, in failing health, Keckley returned to Washington. The woman who had done so much to assist other people in need spent the final years of her life in the National Home for Destitute Colored Women and Children, an institution that had grown out of the same refugee relief efforts she had led decades earlier.

Jordan Grant is a New Media Assistant working with the American Enterprise exhibition, located in the Mars Hall of American Business. He has also blogged about the challenge of depicting the business of slavery in the exhibition.

Posted Date: 
Tuesday, March 22, 2016 - 08:30
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Philanthropist Donates $10 Million to Jefferson Memorial Museum

Smithsonian Magazine

A newly announced $10 million donation from philanthropist David Rubenstein is set to fund upgrades, improvements and the creation of an underground museum at the Jefferson Memorial in Washington, D.C.

As Mikaela Lefrak reports for WAMU, the billionaire’s gift will enable officials to replace the memorial’s current museum—“dimly-lit” and “cramped,” the space hasn’t been updated since the 1990s—with a state-of-the-art education center. Per the Washington Post’s Michael Ruane, the donation will also fund a new exhibition space on the memorial’s main level, where tourists mingle in the shadow of a nearly 19-foot-tall bronze statue of the nation’s third president.

The planned museum’s goal is simple, Rubenstein—co-founder of the D.C.-based Carlyle Group and a member of the Smithsonian Institution’s Board of Regents—tells USA Today’s Susan Page: “So when people go, they can actually learn about Jefferson.”

According to a National Park Foundation press release, the revamped museum will highlight new perspectives on Jefferson’s “multi-faceted story,” incorporating tactile and auditory design elements dedicated to ensuring accessibility.

“[The space is] in desperate need of refreshing,” Jeff Reinbold, superintendent of the National Mall and Memorial Parks for the National Park Service, which manages the Jefferson Memorial, explains to Lefrak.

He hopes to complete work on the new museum by the memorial’s 80th anniversary in 2023.

“Thomas Jefferson, author of the Declaration of Independence, played a central role in the creation of our country,” Rubenstein says in the statement. “Telling the story of his greatness along with his failings will enable visitors to better understand his genius and humanity. I am deeply honored and humbled to have this opportunity to help improve and restore this iconic memorial.”

The underground museum project isn’t the only construction campaign underway at the D.C. monument. As Lefrak writes, the Park Service is currently conducting an $8.75 million restoration effort to repair the memorial’s internal roofing structure and remove black biofilm that began growing on the marble dome in 2010.

In a separate WAMU article, Lefrak explains that the biofilm is actually made up of fungi, algae and bacteria. These microorganisms live in the pores of rocks and produce a black substance to protect themselves from solar radiation. The Park Service is using special lasers to remove the surprisingly resilient gunk and expects to finish work by April 2020.

In addition to the Jefferson Memorial, the unsightly film has also cropped up at the Lincoln Memorial, the Washington Monument, Arlington National Cemetery, the D.C. War Memorial and the Smithsonian’s National Museum of the American Indian.

The Post’s Ruane notes that the Jefferson Memorial has experienced an array of issues since its dedication by President Franklin D. Roosevelt in 1943. The structure sits on soft material dredged from the Potomac River and is supported by 634 sunken pilings and caissons, one of which reaches a depth of 138 feet belowground. Over the decades, these supports have shifted and settled, forcing officials to embark on major projects—most recently in 2010—aimed at preventing parts of the monument from sinking into the muck.

Rubenstein’s gift is part of a decade-long project he calls Patriotic Preservation. Previously, the billionaire has donated funds to build a library at George Washington’s Mount Vernon home, repair the Washington Monument, and restore parts of James Madison’s Montpelier home and Jefferson’s Monticello. In 2016, Rubenstein also donated $18.5 million to repair the Lincoln Memorial.

The planned Jefferson museum will add to a growing body of research centered on re-interpreting the president’s legacy. Jefferson, dubbed the “American Sphinx” in a nod to his pivotal role in United States history, was a man of huge contradictions whose ideas have long been championed by people across the political and ideological spectrum. Most notably, many have questioned his position on race relations: Jefferson was a slave owner who favored gradual emancipation, and he fathered four children with Sally Hemings, an enslaved woman who worked on his Monticello plantation.

Rubenstein says, “While Thomas Jefferson is not without some things that we can question today, clearly he did some great things for our country, including being the author of the Declaration of Independence, creating the University of Virginia, and as president, he bought the land that we call the Louisiana Purchase, which doubled the size of our country.”

Meet a Philanthropist | A Conversation with Helen LaKelly Hunt

National Museum of American History
Join philanthropist and women’s funding leader Helen LaKelly Hunt in the Smithsonian’s first Meet a Philanthropist program. Hunt speaks with Dr. Amanda B. Moniz, David M. Rubenstein Curator of Philanthropy, about co-founding Women Moving Millions, a global network of donors who have given $1 million or more to advancing women and girls globally. Hunt also describes her efforts to catalyze women philanthropists and elevate the stories of notable women givers by literally writing them into history. MEET A PHILANTHROPIST: A CONVERSATION WITH HELEN LAKELLY HUNT took place at the National Museum of American History on November 14, 2018. This program was made possible through the support of the Fidelity Charitable Trustees' Initiative, a grantmaking program of Fidelity Charitable. To view other Philanthropy Initiative programs, visit: http://bit.ly/2JE4ivl. For more about the Philanthropy Initiative, visit https://americanhistory.si.edu/philanthropy.

Meet a Philanthropist | A Conversation with Helen LaKelly Hunt

National Museum of American History
Join philanthropist and women’s funding leader Helen LaKelly Hunt in the Smithsonian’s first MEET A PHILANTHROPIST program. Hunt speaks with Dr. Amanda B. Moniz, David M. Rubenstein Curator of Philanthropy, about co-founding Women Moving Millions, a global network of donors who have given $1 million or more to advancing women and girls globally. Hunt also describes her efforts to catalyze women philanthropists and elevate the stories of notable women givers by literally writing them into history. MEET A PHILANTHROPIST: A CONVERSATION WITH HELEN LAKELLY HUNT took place at the National Museum of American History on November 14, 2018. This program was made possible through the support of the Fidelity Charitable Trustees' Initiative, a grantmaking program of Fidelity Charitable. To view other Philanthropy Initiative programs, visit http://s.si.edu/PhilanthropyPlaylist. For more about the Philanthropy Initiative, visit https://americanhistory.si.edu/philan....

Meet a Philanthropist: Helen LaKelly Hunt on Women Moving Millions

National Museum of American History
Philanthropist and women’s funding leader Helen LaKelly Hunt speaks about the origins of Women Moving Millions, the global network of donors co-founded with her sister Ambassador Swanee Hunt. MEET A PHILANTHROPIST: A CONVERSATION WITH HELEN LAKELLY HUNT took place at the National Museum of American History on November 14, 2018. This program was made possible through the support of the Fidelity Charitable Trustees' Initiative, a grantmaking program of Fidelity Charitable. To view other Philanthropy Initiative programs, visit http://s.si.edu/PhilanthropyPlaylist. For more about the Philanthropy Initiative, visit https://americanhistory.si.edu/philanthropy

Meet a Philanthropist: Helen LaKelly Hunt on Lucretia Mott

National Museum of American History
Philanthropist and women’s funding leader Helen LaKelly Hunt speaks about abolitionist and "radical revolutionary" Lucretia Mott, one of the subjects of her book, AND THE SPIRIT MOVED THEM: THE LOST RADICAL HISTORY OF AMERICA'S FIRST FEMINISTS (2017). MEET A PHILANTHROPIST: A CONVERSATION WITH HELEN LAKELLY HUNT took place at the National Museum of American History on November 14, 2018. This program was made possible through the support of the Fidelity Charitable Trustees' Initiative, a grantmaking program of Fidelity Charitable. To view other Philanthropy Initiative programs, visit http://s.si.edu/PhilanthropyPlaylist. For more about the Philanthropy Initiative, visit https://americanhistory.si.edu/philanthropy

Charles Hayden (1870-1937)

Smithsonian Institution Archives
A painting of banker and philanthropist Charles Hayden (1870-1937) by American artist Wilbur Fiske Noyes (1897-1951).

William Wilson Corcoran

Smithsonian Archives - History Div
The original negative number is 18873, but that negative has been lost. This is a full length standing figure photographed from a painting

William Wilson Corcoran (1798-1888), banker and, philanthropist, commissioned James Renwick to design a gallery, now the Renwick Gallery, at the corner of Pennsylvania Avenue and 17th Street in 1859.

Oral history interview with Virginia Wright, 2017 March 22- 23

Archives of American Art
Transcript: 88 pages.

4 sound files (3 hrs., 13 min.) digital, wav

An oral history interview with Virginia Wright conducted 2017 March 22-23, by Mija Riedel, for the Archives of American Art and the Center for the History of Collecting in America at the Frick Art Reference Library of The Frick Collection, at Wright's home in Seattle, Washington.

Oral history interview with Peter and Paula Lunder, 2017 October 19-20

Archives of American Art
Audio: 5 sound files (2 hr., 41 min.) digital, wav Transcript: 64 pages An oral history interview with Peter and Paula Lunder conducted 2017 October 19-20, by James McElhinney, for the Archives of American Art and the Center for the History of Collecting in America at the Frick Art Reference Library of The Frick Collection, at Colby College in Waterville, Maine.
Mr. and Ms. Lunder discuss their time living in Waterville and Dexter, Maine and Mr. Lunder's work as a partner at the Dexter Shoe Company; their exposures to art and culture while growing up in Boston and Chicago; their initial interests in art collecting and the shift of their focus from European art to American art; their associations with Hugh Gourley and other directors and curators at the Colby College Museum of Art; the relationships they made with fellow art collectors, museum curators, art dealers and gallery owners while growing their collection and when working on finding a home for their collection; their relationship with the former director of the Smithsonian American Art Museum Betsy Broun; Mr. Lunder's initial interest in Southwestern art and the development of their collection to include a wide range of American art; and Mr. Lunder's partial ownership of the Boston Red Sox beginning in 1977. Mr. and Ms. Lunder also describe living part-time in Florida and their patronage of the Norton Museum of Art in West Palm Beach; their desire to endow their collection to a Northeast regional museum in Maine; their belief in the importance of art conservation and their focus on having the collection be used for teaching; Ms. Lunder's work as a volunteer docent at the Colby Art Museum; and their work with the Clark Art Institute to support a place for art conservation in the region. Mr. and Ms. Lunder also recall Max Stern; Jere Abbott; Bro Adams; Thomas Colville; Margaret MacDonald; Sharon Corwin; Ann and Gil Maurer; Alice Walton as well as Jay Cantor; Seelye Bixler; Michael Greenbaum; George Gurney; Cy Twombly; Stephen Hannock; Doug Baxter; Christa Gaehde; and Michael Conforti, among others.

Watson Davis, Virginia Outwin Boochever, Marguerite Elaine Dobson Nicholson, James Thomas Nicholson, and Helen Miles Davis

Smithsonian Institution Archives
left to right: Watson Davis (1896-1967), Director of Science Service; philanthropist Virginia Outwin Boochever (1920-2005); Marguerite Elaine Dobson Nicholson (1894-1969); James Thomas Nicholson (1893-1969), Director, American Red Cross; and chemist and editor Helen Miles Davis (1895-1957), at a cocktail party sponsored by U.S. Steel.

Ellen Scripps Booth and Florrence Booth

Archives of American Art
1 slide ; 8 x 10 cm. Identification (typewritten): Mrs. George G. Booth. Chatelaine of Cranbrook and Hostes of garden party for [illegible] of Federation of Arts, 1918.

Florrence Booth who has the distinction of being the youngest member in her own name of the Arts and Crafts with her father G. G. Booth.

John B. Pierce [sculpture] / (photographer unknown)

Archives and Special Collections, Smithsonian American Art Museum
On photo mount label: R. Evans. Portrait statue of John D. (sic) Pierce, philanthropist (bronze). New York, Pierce Foundation. Classification number: 282/E92/635. Accession: 60962.

1 photographic print : b&w, 9 1/8 x 6 5/8 in. (trimmed), mounted on 9 3/4 x 13 7/84 in. board.

Formerly located: Raritan, New Jersey, ca. 1917-1950s.

Mrs. Julius Fleischmann, Jr. (Dorette Kruse) [painting] / (photographed by Peter A. Juley & Son)

Archives and Special Collections, Smithsonian American Art Museum
Black-and-white study print (8x10).

Orig. negative: 8x10, Nitrate, BW.

copy 1 negative: 8x10, Safety, BW.

Mrs. Cornelius Vanderbilt Whitney (Eleanor Searle) [painting] / (photographed by Peter A. Juley & Son)

Archives and Special Collections, Smithsonian American Art Museum
Black-and-white study print (8x10).

Orig. negative: 8x10, Safety, BW.

Mrs. Morris Cafritz (Gwendolyn Detre de Surrey) [painting] / (photographed by Peter A. Juley & Son)

Archives and Special Collections, Smithsonian American Art Museum
Black-and-white study print (8x10).

Orig. negative: 8x10, Safety, BW.

Mrs. Cornelius Vanderbilt Whitney (Eleanor Searle) [painting] / (photographed by Peter A. Juley & Son)

Archives and Special Collections, Smithsonian American Art Museum
Black-and-white study print (8x10).

Orig. negative: 8x10, Safety, BW.

Mrs. Charles Barnett Goodspeed (Elizabeth "Bobsy" Fuller) [painting] / (photographed by Peter A. Juley & Son)

Archives and Special Collections, Smithsonian American Art Museum
Black-and-white study print (8x10).

Orig. negative: 8x10, Nitrate, BW.

copy 1 negative: 8x10, Safety, BW.

Mrs. Cornelius Vanderbilt Whitney (Eleanor Searle) [painting] / (photographed by Peter A. Juley & Son)

Archives and Special Collections, Smithsonian American Art Museum
Black-and-white study print (8x10).

Orig. negative: 8x10, Safety, BW.

Mrs. Harrison Williams (Margaret Edmona "Mona" Strader) [painting] / (photographed by Peter A. Juley & Son)

Archives and Special Collections, Smithsonian American Art Museum
Black-and-white study print (8x10).

Orig. negative: 8x10, Nitrate, BW.

copy 1 negative: 8x10, Safety, BW.
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