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The National Native American Veterans Memorial Consultation

National Museum of the American Indian
The National Museum of the American Indian has been authorized by Congress to create a memorial honoring the service of Native Americans in the armed forces of the United States. In this special presentation, Kevin Gover (Pawnee), Director of the National Museum of the American Indian, presents details regarding the planning for this important veterans memorial that will be built on the grounds of the museum in 2020. Herman J. Viola, curator emeritus at the Smithsonian Institution and author of Warriors in Uniform, the Legacy of American Indian Heroism, also speaks on the importance of a Native American Veterans Memorial. The museum is seeking comments from Native Americans on this project. This presentation was recorded at the National Museum of the American Indian in Washington, D. C. on May 25, 2017.

Native/American Fashion 8 | Kathleen Ash-Milby

National Museum of the American Indian
Native/American Fashion: Inspiration, Appropriation, and Cultural Identity explores fashion as a creative endeavor and an expression of cultural identity, the history of Native fashion, issues of problematic cultural appropriation in the field, and examples of creative collaborations and best practices between Native designers and fashion brands. In this segment, Kathleen Ash-Milby of the National Museum of the American Indian gives a short introduction to the second panel of the day, Problematics of Cultural Appropriation in Contemporary Fashion, which she is moderating. This event was webcast and recorded in the Diker Pavilion of the National Museum of the American Indian George Gustav Heye Center in New York City on April 22, 2017.

Native/American Fashion 13 | Eileen Karp

National Museum of the American Indian
Native/American Fashion: Inspiration, Appropriation, and Cultural Identity explores fashion as a creative endeavor and an expression of cultural identity, the history of Native fashion, issues of problematic cultural appropriation in the field, and examples of creative collaborations and best practices between Native designers and fashion brands. In this segment, Eileen Karp of the Fashion Institute of Technology, State University of New York, gives a short introduction to the third panel of the day, Creative Collaborations, which she is moderating. This event was webcast and recorded in the Diker Pavilion of the National Museum of the American Indian George Gustav Heye Center in New York City on April 22, 2017.

Comanche Nation Festival 4 - Native American Flute

National Museum of the American Indian
Numunu Voices in the Wind is the first festival brought to the museum by the Comanche Nation of Oklahoma, celebrating the culture and heritage of the "Lords of the Plains." In this segment, Comanche flutist Tim Nevaquaya tells the traditional story of the origin of the Comanche flute and plays several pieces. The festival was webcast and recorded in the Potomac Atrium of the National Museum of the American Indian on November 28, 2014.

Why We Serve: Stories of Native American Service

National Museum of the American Indian
On November 11, 2020—Veterans Day—the country will dedicate the Native American Veterans Memorial on the grounds of the National Museum of the American Indian in Washington, D.C. If you are a Native American, Alaska Native, or Native Hawaiian who has served in the U.S. Armed Forces, please plan to be part of the Native Veterans Procession that will open the dedication ceremony. Learn more at http://bit.ly/NativeVeteransProcession. If you're not a Native veteran, we hope you'll join us at the procession and other events throughout the day to honor those who have served and those who serve today. To receive updates about the dedication, sign up at https://s.si.edu/34Wl3cR.

National Native American Veterans Memorial: Washington, D.C., Consultation

National Museum of the American Indian
The National Museum of the American Indian has been authorized by Congress to create a memorial honoring the service of Native Americans in the Armed Forces of the United States. During this consultation, tribal leaders hear from Kevin Gover (Pawnee Tribe of Oklahoma), director of the museum, about plans for the memorial. They ask questions and offer suggestions on several aspects of the plan. This meeting was webcast and recorded at the National Museum of the American Indian in Washington, D.C., on September 28, 2016.

Design of the National Native American Veterans Memorial

National Museum of the American Indian
New drawings show the setting for the memorial to Native American veterans to be built on the grounds of the National Museum of the American Indian in Washington, D.C. The perspective moves from the museum's Welcome Plaza down the approach path to the memorial itself. The last drawing shows the standing ring of the memorial as it will be seen from the southeast corner of the National Mall, between the U.S. Capitol and the museum. Design by Harvey Pratt/Butzer Architects and Urbanism, illustration by Skyline Ink, courtesy of the Smithsonian's National Museum of the American Indian

Native/American Fashion 17 | Creative Collaborations Q&A

National Museum of the American Indian
Native/American Fashion: Inspiration, Appropriation, and Cultural Identity explores fashion as a creative endeavor and an expression of cultural identity, the history of Native fashion, issues of problematic cultural appropriation in the field, and examples of creative collaborations and best practices between Native designers and fashion brands. In this segment, speakers from the third panel, Creative Collaborations, return to the stage to take questions from the audience. The panel is moderated by Eileen Karp of the Fashion Institute of Technology, State University of New York. Panelists include founder and owner of Beyond Buckskin Jessica Metcalfe and artist/designers Virgil Ortiz and Douglas Miles. This event was webcast and recorded in the Diker Pavilion of the National Museum of the American Indian George Gustav Heye Center in New York City on April 22, 2017.

Native Pride Dancers 1

National Museum of the American Indian
Two-time World Champion fancy dancer, Larry Yazzie (Sac and Fox) directs the Native Pride Dancers in a dance presentation that celebrates the spirit and beauty of indigenous people of North America. This was the first of two performances that was webcast from the Potomac Atrium of the National Museum of the American Indian on November 5, 2014.

Native Pride Dancers 2

National Museum of the American Indian
Two-time World Champion fancy dancer, Larry Yazzie (Sac and Fox) directs the Native Pride Dancers in a dance presentation that celebrates the spirit and beauty of indigenous people of North America. This was the second of two performances that was webcast from the Potomac Atrium of the National Museum of the American Indian on November 5, 2014.

Native Storytelling: Thirza Defoe

National Museum of the American Indian
Grammy-winning artist, performer, and storyteller Thirza Defoe shares traditional Ojibwe and Oneida stories, not only with words but also with music, song, and dance. You may even get to meet Grandma Quay and hear some of her stories as well!

Native Pride Dancers

National Museum of the American Indian
Authentic regalia, rhythmic drumming, skilled footwork: Experience the excitement of a Native American powwow! World champion fancy dancer Larry Yazzie of the Meskwaki Nation and the Native Pride Dancers perform music and movement celebrated by their American Indian cultures. Enjoy the beauty, athleticism, and majesty of the Fancy Dance in this performance featuring free-style movement, dance regalia, and traditional songs from the Northern Plains. Enhanced by indigenous vocal and flute music, Buffalo, Eagle, Round, and other dances celebrate various animals, crops, the sun, and the wind.

Native Pride Dancers

National Museum of the American Indian
Authentic regalia, rhythmic drumming, skilled footwork: Experience the excitement of a Native American powwow! World champion fancy dancer Larry Yazzie of the Meskwaki Nation and the Native Pride Dancers perform music and movement celebrated by their American Indian cultures. Enjoy the beauty, athleticism, and majesty of the Fancy Dance in this performance featuring free-style movement, dance regalia, and traditional songs from the Northern Plains. Enhanced by indigenous vocal and flute music, Buffalo, Eagle, Round, and other dances celebrate various animals, crops, the sun, and the wind.

Native/American Fashion 10 | Joe Horse Capture

National Museum of the American Indian
Native/American Fashion: Inspiration, Appropriation, and Cultural Identity explores fashion as a creative endeavor and an expression of cultural identity, the history of Native fashion, issues of problematic cultural appropriation in the field, and examples of creative collaborations and best practices between Native designers and fashion brands. In this segment, we hear from the second panelist to speak on the topic Problematics of Cultural Appropriation in Contemporary Fashion, Joe Horse Capture of the Minnesota Historical Society. His talk is titled Non-Natives as Native Americans: “I’m an Indian Too.” Joe D. Horse Capture (A’aninin) has been involved with museums for more than 18 years. A second-generation curator, Horse Capture was the associate curator of Native American Art at the Minneapolis Institute of Arts, associate curator at the National Museum of the American Indian, and is currently the director of Native American Initiatives at the Minnesota Historical Society. He is widely published in the field of Native American art and culture and has served as a consultant for several projects in the United States and Europe. This event was webcast and recorded in the Diker Pavilion of the National Museum of the American Indian George Gustav Heye Center in New York City on April 22, 2017.

Native/American Fashion 14 | Jessica Metcalfe

National Museum of the American Indian
Native/American Fashion: Inspiration, Appropriation, and Cultural Identity explores fashion as a creative endeavor and an expression of cultural identity, the history of Native fashion, issues of problematic cultural appropriation in the field, and examples of creative collaborations and best practices between Native designers and fashion brands. In this segment, we hear from the first panelist to speak on the topic Creative Collaborations, the founder and owner of Beyond Buckskin, Jessica Metcalfe. Jessica R. Metcalfe (Turtle Mountain Chippewa) is the owner and author of the website Beyond Buckskin, which focuses on all topics related to Native American fashion, including historical adornment, contemporary design, and issues related to cultural appropriation in the fashion industry. She is the owner of the Beyond Buckskin Boutique, which promotes and sells Native American-made couture, streetwear, jewelry, and accessories, and is based out of the Turtle Mountain Indian Reservation in Belcourt, North Dakota. Metcalfe, who wrote her doctoral dissertation on Native designers of high fashion, has co-curated exhibitions and taught college courses in Native American studies, studio art, art history, and literature. Her current work focuses on American Indian art, clothing, and design from all time periods, with an emphasis on contemporary artists. This event was webcast and recorded in the Diker Pavilion of the National Museum of the American Indian George Gustav Heye Center in New York City on April 22, 2017.

Native/American Fashion 9 | Adrienne Keene

National Museum of the American Indian
Native/American Fashion: Inspiration, Appropriation, and Cultural Identity explores fashion as a creative endeavor and an expression of cultural identity, the history of Native fashion, issues of problematic cultural appropriation in the field, and examples of creative collaborations and best practices between Native designers and fashion brands. In this segment, we hear from the first panelist to speak on the topic Problematics of Cultural Appropriation in Contemporary Fashion, Adrienne Keene of Brown University. Her talk is titled “Navajo” Underwear and Headdresses on the Runway: A Look at the Last Five Years of Cultural Appropriation in Fashion. Adrienne Keene (Cherokee Nation) is assistant professor of American Studies at Brown University. A Native scholar, writer, blogger, and activist, she is passionate about reframing how the world sees contemporary Native cultures. She is the creator and author of Native Appropriations, an internationally recognized blog discussing cultural appropriation and stereotypes of Native peoples in fashion, film, music, and other forms of pop culture. Through her writing and activism, Keene questions and problematizes the ways indigenous peoples are represented, asking for celebrities, large corporations, and designers to consider the ways they incorporate “Native” elements into their work. She is interested in the way Native peoples are using social and new media to challenge misrepresentations and present counter-narratives that showcase true Native cultures and identities. This event was webcast and recorded in the Diker Pavilion of the National Museum of the American Indian George Gustav Heye Center in New York City on April 22, 2017.

Native/American Fashion 4 | Timothy Shannon

National Museum of the American Indian
Native/American Fashion: Inspiration, Appropriation, and Cultural Identity explores fashion as a creative endeavor and an expression of cultural identity, the history of Native fashion, issues of problematic cultural appropriation in the field, and examples of creative collaborations and best practices between Native designers and fashion brands. In this segment, we hear from the second panelist to speak on the topic Mobility and Cultural Identity Through Fashion, Timothy Shannon of Gettysburg College. His talk is titled Clothes along the Mohawk: Fashion, Exchange, and Appropriation among the Peoples of Early New York. Timothy J. Shannon is a professor and chair of the History Department at Gettysburg College, where he teaches early American and Native American history. His books include Iroquois Diplomacy on the Early American Frontier (Penguin, 2008) and Indians and Colonists at the Crossroads of Empire: The Albany Congress of 1754 (Cornell, 2000), which won the Dixon Ryan Fox Prize from the New York State Historical Association and the Distinguished Book Award from the Society of Colonial Wars. His book Indian Captive, Indian King: Peter Williamson in America and Britain will be published by Harvard University Press in fall 2017. This event was webcast and recorded in the Diker Pavilion of the National Museum of the American Indian George Gustav Heye Center in New York City on April 22, 2017.

Native/American Fashion 6 | Daniel James Cole

National Museum of the American Indian
Native/American Fashion: Inspiration, Appropriation, and Cultural Identity explores fashion as a creative endeavor and an expression of cultural identity, the history of Native fashion, issues of problematic cultural appropriation in the field, and examples of creative collaborations and best practices between Native designers and fashion brands. In this segment, we hear from the fourth panelist to speak on the topic Mobility and Cultural Identity Through Fashion, Daniel James Cole of the Fashion Institute of Technology, State University of New York. His talk is titled Everything’s Better with War Bonnet on It! Daniel James Cole teaches in the Fashion Design program at the Fashion Institute of Technology, State University of New York, and in Graduate Costume Studies at New York University. He is co-author, with Nancy Deihl, of The History of Modern Fashion (Laurence King, 2015) and has presented at academic conferences internationally. His areas of expertise include religiously motivated dress, and Malaysian and Indonesian dress and textiles. He has curated two exhibitions for OPERA America/National Opera Center: Martin Palkedinaz: A Tribute (2013) and Divas of the Gilded Age (2015). Earlier this month, Cole presented the paper “Indigenous Invention: Hide Clothing of the Plains Indians as a Sustainability Paradigm” at New York University at another symposium in conjunction with the Native Fashion Now exhibition. This event was webcast and recorded in the Diker Pavilion of the National Museum of the American Indian George Gustav Heye Center in New York City on April 22, 2017.

Native/American Fashion 16 | Douglas Miles

National Museum of the American Indian
Native/American Fashion: Inspiration, Appropriation, and Cultural Identity explores fashion as a creative endeavor and an expression of cultural identity, the history of Native fashion, issues of problematic cultural appropriation in the field, and examples of creative collaborations and best practices between Native designers and fashion brands. In this segment, we hear from the second panelist to speak on the topic Creative Collaborations, artist and designer Douglas Miles. Douglas Miles (San Carlos Apache/Akimel O’odham) fuses bold, graffiti-inspired graphics with Apache iconography and language. Years ago he painted his first skateboard, for his son. His brand, Apache Skateboards—the first Native-owned skateboard company—grew from that deck, and soon it included a line of streetwear. In 2009–10, Miles collaborated with the internationally popular sportswear brand Volcom. His designs for Volcom’s Stone-Age line of clothing and accessories brought Apache design to contemporary skate culture. His mission is to empower Native youth and highlight social issues that confront their communities today. This event was webcast and recorded in the Diker Pavilion of the National Museum of the American Indian George Gustav Heye Center in New York City on April 22, 2017.

Native/American Fashion 3 | Anna Blume

National Museum of the American Indian
Native/American Fashion: Inspiration, Appropriation, and Cultural Identity explores fashion as a creative endeavor and an expression of cultural identity, the history of Native fashion, issues of problematic cultural appropriation in the field, and examples of creative collaborations and best practices between Native designers and fashion brands. In this segment, we hear from the first panelist to speak on the topic Mobility and Cultural Identity Through Fashion, Anna Blume of the Fashion Institute of Technology, State University of New York. Her talk is titled Fluidity of Referents: Maya Appropriations and Adornments. Anna Blume is a professor in the History of Art Department at the Fashion Institute of Technology, State University of New York, where she teaches courses on pre-Columbian and South Asian cultures with a particular focus on the relationship between photography and archaeology and art and ethics. She recently studied ancient monumental architecture and sculpture in the Mississippi Valley and is working on a long-term project at the American Museum of Natural History on archaic Native North American lithics. Previous studies have included Maya concepts of zero and pre-Columbian images of human animal hybridity. This event was webcast and recorded in the Diker Pavilion of the National Museum of the American Indian George Gustav Heye Center in New York City on April 22, 2017.

Native/American Fashion 15 | Virgil Ortiz

National Museum of the American Indian
Native/American Fashion: Inspiration, Appropriation, and Cultural Identity explores fashion as a creative endeavor and an expression of cultural identity, the history of Native fashion, issues of problematic cultural appropriation in the field, and examples of creative collaborations and best practices between Native designers and fashion brands. In this segment, we hear from the second panelist to speak on the topic Creative Collaborations, artist and designer Virgil Ortiz. Virgil Ortiz (Cochiti Pueblo), contemporary Native American artist and fashion designer, grew up in New Mexico in a family of Cochiti Pueblo potters in which telling stories, collecting clay, gathering wild plants, and producing figurative pottery all were part of everyday life. After a highly successful collaboration with fashion icon Donna Karan, during which he developed boldly patterned textiles based on his graphic decorative painting, Ortiz has since launched his own fashion line. His designs, such as sharp laser-cut leather jackets, swinging taffeta skirts, cashmere sweaters, and silk scarves, echo the voluminous contours and sinuous motifs of Pueblo pottery while showcasing the richness of indigenous high fashion and compelling storytelling of Pueblo culture and history. This event was webcast and recorded in the Diker Pavilion of the National Museum of the American Indian George Gustav Heye Center in New York City on April 22, 2017.

Native/American Fashion 2 | Amy Werbel

National Museum of the American Indian
The symposium Native/American Fashion: Inspiration, Appropriation, and Cultural Identity explores fashion as a creative endeavor and an expression of cultural identity, the history of Native fashion, issues of problematic cultural appropriation in the field, and examples of creative collaborations and best practices between Native designers and fashion brands. In this segment, Amy Werbel of the Fashion Institute of Technology, State University of New York, moderates the first panel of speakers on Mobility and Cultural Identity through Fashion, and here provides an introduction to the topic. Amy Werbel is an associate professor in the History of Art Department at the Fashion Institute of Technology, State University of New York. Her scholarship focuses on gender, sexuality, and censorship in American art. Her books include "Thomas Eakins: Art, Medicine, and Sexuality in Nineteenth-Century Philadelphia" (Yale, 2007) and "Lust on Trial: American Art, Law, and Culture during the Reign of Anthony Comstock," to be published by Columbia University Press in 2018. She served as a Fulbright Scholar in China, teaching American Studies at Guangdong University of Foreign Studies in Guangzhou in 2011–12, and is currently a Fulbright Alumni Ambassador. Her book, "Lessons from China: America in the Hearts and Minds of the World’s Most Important Rising Generation" (2013), reflects on these crosscultural experiences. This event was webcast and recorded in the Diker Pavilion of the National Museum of the American Indian, George Gustav Heye Center in New York City on April 22, 2017.

Native/American Fashion 11 | Lynette Nylander

National Museum of the American Indian
Native/American Fashion: Inspiration, Appropriation, and Cultural Identity explores fashion as a creative endeavor and an expression of cultural identity, the history of Native fashion, issues of problematic cultural appropriation in the field, and examples of creative collaborations and best practices between Native designers and fashion brands. In this segment, we hear from the third panelist to speak on the topic Problematics of Cultural Appropriation in Contemporary Fashion, writer, editor, and creative consultant Lynette Nylander. Her talk is titled Cultural Appropriation or Appreciation? A Modern-Day Critique. Lynette Nylander is a writer, editor, and creative consultant living in London. Recently named to the Forbes 30 Under 30 Europe list, she previously held the position of deputy editor of prestigious style bible i-D ; she continues to contribute to both i-D and the biannual Industrie magazine. She regularly contributes to Elle UK, The Guardian, and Refinery29, and has spoken at the British Film Institute and the Victoria and Albert Museum on race, gender, and pop culture. This event was webcast and recorded in the Diker Pavilion of the National Museum of the American Indian George Gustav Heye Center in New York City on April 22, 2017.

Native/American Fashion 5 | Sherry Farrell Racette

National Museum of the American Indian
Native/American Fashion: Inspiration, Appropriation, and Cultural Identity explores fashion as a creative endeavor and an expression of cultural identity, the history of Native fashion, issues of problematic cultural appropriation in the field, and examples of creative collaborations and best practices between Native designers and fashion brands. In this segment, we hear from the third panelist to speak on the topic Mobility and Cultural Identity Through Fashion, Sherry Farrell Racette of University of Manitoba. Her talk is titled Ball Gowns, Moccasins, and Black Beaver Hats: York Factory and Red River as Sites of Fashion Innovation. Sherry Farrell Racette (Timiskaming First Nation) is an interdisciplinary scholar with an active arts practice. Recent curatorial and artistic projects include We Are Not Birds (2014) and From Here: Story Gatherings from the Qu’Appelle Valley (2015). Racette teaches at the University of Manitoba, but is currently in Toronto as the 2016–2017 Distinguished Visiting Indigenous Faculty Fellow at the Jackman Humanities Institute and Visiting Resident Scholar at Massey College. This event was webcast and recorded in the Diker Pavilion of the National Museum of the American Indian George Gustav Heye Center in New York City on April 22, 2017.
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