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Anacostia Museum Building

Smithsonian Archives - History Div
Exterior walls of the Anacostia Museum's new building at 1901 Fort Place, S.E., Washington, D.C., which opened May 17, 1987 next to its laboratory-research center built in 1975. The new building is approximately 10 blocks from the Museum's former location and was developed by the architectural firm of Keyes Condon Florance. In 1995 the Museum was renamed Anacostia Museum and Center for African American History and Culture. After the Smithsonian launched its new National Museum of African American History and Culture, the Museum was renamed Anacostia Community Museum in 2006.

United States National Museum Building

Smithsonian Institution Archives
Also known as SIA2009-1819

Image used in Richard Rathbun's history of the museum construction, which was published as "A Descriptive Account of the Building Recently Erected for the Departments of Natural History of the United States National Museum," United States National Museum Bulletin 80, Washington, 1913.

National Museum Building Committee, 1880

Smithsonian Archives - History Div
Negative # 1475 was used to add Rhees and Leech to this photograph.

The National Museum Building Committee stand in an unfinished doorway of the new United States National Museum Building, now the Arts and Industries Building, while it is under construction. From the left: General Montgomery C. Meigs; General William Tecumseh Sherman, Smithsonian Regent and Chairman of Building Committee; Peter Parker, Smithsonian Regent; Spencer F. Baird, Smithsonian Secretary; Adolph Cluss, Architect; W. J. Rhees, Chief Clerk; Daniel Leech, Correspondence Clerk.

Construction of the United States National Museum Building

Smithsonian Institution Archives
Also known as 20823

Caption taken from image 20821.

Construction of the United States National Museum, now known as the National Museum of Natural History, July 8, 1908. The exterior walls are almost to their full height, but there are no windows. Building materials are on the ground.

Construction of the United States National Museum Building

Smithsonian Institution Archives
Also known as 20820 and MAH-20820

Construction of the United States National Museum, now known as the National Museum of Natural History, July 8, 1908. The exterior walls are almost to their full height, but there are no windows. Building materials are on the ground.

Construction of the United States National Museum Building

Smithsonian Institution Archives
Also known as 20824

Caption taken from image 20821.

Construction of the United States National Museum, now known as the National Museum of Natural History, July 8, 1908. The exterior walls are almost to their full height, but there are no windows. Building materials are on the ground.

Construction of the U.S. National Museum Building, 1908

Smithsonian Archives - History Div
In USNM Annual Report for 1908, Plate 3, opposite p. 19.

The United States National Museum, now known as the National Museum of Natural History under construction, July 8, 1908. The exterior walls are done and the windows are in. There is scaffolding around the top floor, but no dome.

Model of the South Mall Area

Smithsonian Institution Archives
See also number 80-4543

Construction of the U.S. National Museum Building, 1908

Smithsonian Archives - History Div
There are similar photos in this location.

Construction of the United States National Museum, now known as the National Museum of Natural History, July 8, 1908. The exterior walls are almost to their full height, but there are no windows. Building materials are on the ground.

Postcard of the United States National Museum Building

Smithsonian Archives - History Div
The Arts and Industries Building was designed by two Philadelphia architects: Adolph Cluss and Rudolph Schulze.

This postcard is located in Accession #02-023, which is part of Record Unit 95.

For another version of this postcard, see Negatives 2003-19543 and SIA2013-07201.

Postcard with an exterior view of the old United States National Museum building, now known as the Arts and Industries Building. 1721 is in the bottom left-hand corner on the front. The front has a white border. The American Flag is flying above the museum, and a couple is sitting on a bench under a tree. The message side is blank, but there is a printed note about the museum: "The National Museum contains the Government collections, comprising millions of objects of scientific and artistic interest, collected from all quarters of the globe."

Construction of U.S. National Museum Building, 1905

Smithsonian Archives - History Div
There are similar photos in this location. The negative numbers that are listed on the pictures are: 19635, 19636

Construction of the U.S. National Museum Building, now known as the National Museum of Natural History, with the laying of the first stone of the building on August 21, 1905. Lowest course, directly east of the North Pavilion. Richard Rathbun, Assistant Secretary in charge of the U.S. National Museum and Acting Secretary when this photograph was taken, can be seen in background, center.

Concept drawing for National Air Museum Building

Smithsonian Archives - History Div
In 1958, President Eisenhower authorized the preparation of plans for the construction of a building for a National Air Museum, to be located on a site bounded by Fourth and Seventh Streets SW, Independence Avenue, and Jefferson Drive. The 1964 design by Hellmuth, Obata & Kassabaum (HOK) for "a Museum for the Space Age" was selected. However, their initial design was later modified. In July 1966, President Lyndon Johnson signed into law a bill authorizing construction of a new building for the newly-renamed National Air and Space Museum (NASM). Congressional passage of appropriations for the construction of the new museum occurred in 1971. The final design was approved in 1972 and construction began in November of 1972. The museum opened July 1, 1976.

HOK were the architects selected. However, their original design was revised and this became the final design.

For the 1972 final design by Hellmuth, Obata & Kassabaum (HOK), see Neg. SIA2017-018111 through 018119, SIA2017-018122 through SIA2017-018134, and 94-2479. See also Neg. SIA2017-018095 through SIA2017-018101 for initial design by HOK. For other designs for a proposed new National Air Museum see: United States, Public Building Administration 1949; McKim, Mead & White 1955; Harbeson, Hough, Livingston & Larson 1962; and HOK's preliminary design of 1964.

Long section concept drawing submitted by Harbeson, Hough, Livingston and Larson, Architects, created for the proposed National Air Museum (now known as the National Air and Space Museum) building. Interior of the building shows airplanes displayed on two levels. They were not selected.

National Air Museum Building in South Yard

Smithsonian Archives - History Div
The old negative number is 30599, but that negative could not be found. Negative number 30599a is a similar photograph from the south-west view.

The National Air Museum building in the South Yard seen from the southeast side with a French made Renault tank and a German howitzer sitting by its door. On the street many automobiles from the 1920's are parked and in the foreground is wrought iron fences around yards. The Air Museum building was a temporary metal building from World War I military work. The Smithsonian Institution Building is seen in the background.

Construction of the U.S. National Museum Building, 1905

Smithsonian Archives - History Div
There are similar photos in this location. The negative numbers that are listed on the pictures are: 19634, 19636

Construction of the U.S. National Museum Building, now known as the National Museum of Natural History, with the laying of the first stone of the building on August 21, 1905. Lowest course, directly east of the North Pavilion.

United States National Museum, Section of Building

Smithsonian Institution Archives
Section of building on north and south axis, looking west. Used in United States National Museum Bulletin 80, plate 32.

Construction of Foundation for U.S. National Museum Building, 1905

Smithsonian Archives - History Div
There are several similar photos at this location.

Workers laying the foundation for the U.S. National Museum Building, now known as the National Museum of Natural History, looking southeast on June 2, 1905.

Postcard of the United States National Museum Building

Smithsonian Archives - History Div
The Arts and Industries Building was designed by two Philadelphia architects: Adolph Cluss and Rudolph Schulze.

1721 in bottom left-hand corner on the front.

For another version of this postcard, see Negatives SIA2013-06643 and SIA2013-06644.

Postcard with an exterior view of the old United States National Museum building, now known as the Arts and Industries Building. 1721 is in the bottom left-hand corner on the front. The front has a white border. An American Flag is flying above the museum, and two people sit on a bench under a tree. On the message side there is a printed note about the museum: "The National Museum contains the Government collections, comprising millions of objects of scientific and artistic interest, collected from all quarters of the globe."

Chemist's Laboratory in U.S. National Museum Building

Smithsonian Archives - History Div
Original negative number is MAH-6088. For a similar photo see negative number MAH-3671, also known as 2002-10634.

Chemist's laboratory on the second floor, south-east pavilion, of the United States National Museum, now the Arts and Industries Building. A table laden with bottles and other paraphernalia is in the center of the room. Two chemists are at work. Another man is visible through an open doorway seated at a table in an adjoining room.

Library in United States National Museum Building

Smithsonian Archives - History Div
See the Annual Report for 1888 p. 38 for information on Murdoch's appointment.

Library, later known as the Jewett Room, in the United States National Museum Building, now known as the Arts & Industries Building, was located in the Northwest Pavilion. Later, this room housed the rare book collection. John Murdoch, Librarian of the Smithsonian Institution, sits at a desk. Murdoch was formerly the Assistant Librarian of the National Museum Library and succeeded Miss Jane A. Turner as Librarian April 1, 1887. He resigned May 15, 1892.

Exhibits in the National Museum Building

Smithsonian Archives - History Div
See also AR 1897: 17; USNM AR 1901: 15.

North Hall of the Arts and Industries Building, before the construction of galleries in 1897-98. Alexander the Great tapestries hang on the wall. They are moved to the lecture hall in 1901. Note clock and grill work on north doors, as well as absence of hanging lights.

Concept drawing for National Air and Space Museum Building

Smithsonian Archives - History Div
In 1958, President Eisenhower authorized the preparation of plans for the construction of a building for a National Air Museum, to be located on a site bounded by Fourth and Seventh Streets SW, Independence Avenue, and Jefferson Drive. The 1964 design by Hellmuth, Obata & Kassabaum (HOK) for "a Museum for the Space Age" was selected. However, their initial design was later modified. In July 1966, President Lyndon Johnson signed into law a bill authorizing construction of a new building for the newly-renamed National Air and Space Museum (NASM). Congressional passage of appropriations for the construction of the new museum occurred in 1971. The final design was approved in 1972 and construction began in November of 1972. The museum opened July 1, 1976.

HOK were the architects selected. However, their original design was revised and this became the final design.

For the 1972 final design by Hellmuth, Obata & Kassabaum (HOK), see Neg. SIA2017-018111 through 018119, SIA2017-018122 through SIA2017-018134, and 94-2479. See also Neg. SIA2017-018095 through SIA2017-018101 for initial design by HOK. For other designs for a proposed new National Air Museum see: United States, Public Building Administration 1949; McKim, Mead & White 1955; Harbeson, Hough, Livingston & Larson 1962; and HOK's preliminary design of 1964.

Cross section through main entrance concept drawing submitted by Harbeson, Hough, Livingston and Larson, Architects created for the proposed new National Air and Space Museum building. Interior shows airplanes displayed on different levels. They were not selected.

Construction of First Story of U.S. National Museum Building, 1905

Smithsonian Archives - History Div
There are several similar photos at this location. There is another shot that is very close to this, but the view is southwest and it was taken 9/7/1905, #17528.

Workers moving stones into place on the first story of the U.S. National Museum Building, now known as the National Museum of Natural History. The tops of the North tower of Castle can be seen over the trees in the distance. The photograph was taken looking to the southwest on September 20, 1905.

Laying First Stone at United States National Museum Building, 1905

Smithsonian Archives - History Div
There are three pictures of the event, see also neg. # 19634, 19635.

Laying of the first stone of the United States National Museum, now known as the National Museum of Natural History, August 21, 1905. Lowest course, directly east of the North Pavilion.

Construction of Exterior Walls of U.S. National Museum Building, 1905

Smithsonian Archives - History Div
There are several similar photos at this location. There is another shot that is very close to this, but the view is northwest, #17727. This negative number may be incorrect.

Construction of the exterior wall of the U.S. National Museum Building, now known as the National Museum of Natural History, looking south on October 9, 1905. The first story of windows are in place and workers are working on an arch over one of them.
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