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Found 638 Resources

Ring money, West Africa

National Museum of American History
The phrase ring money refers to metal rings that may have been used in exchange or for jewelry in West Africa. These rings were made from various metals including silver, brass, and copper. Due to limited information about the origins of the ring money in the National Numismatic Collection it is not possible to determine if this specific object was used as a medium of exchange, worn as jewelry, or produced as a replica.

Ring money, West Africa

National Museum of American History
The phrase ring money refers to metal rings that may have been used in exchange or for jewelry in West Africa. These rings were made from various metals including silver, brass, and copper. Due to limited information about the origins of the ring money in the National Numismatic Collection it is not possible to determine if this specific object was used as a medium of exchange, worn as jewelry, or produced as a replica.

Ring money, West Africa

National Museum of American History
The phrase ring money refers to metal rings that may have been used in exchange or for jewelry in West Africa. These rings were made from various metals including silver, brass, and copper. Due to limited information about the origins of the ring money in the National Numismatic Collection it is not possible to determine if this specific object was used as a medium of exchange, worn as jewelry, or produced as a replica.

Ring money, West Africa

National Museum of American History
The phrase ring money refers to metal rings that may have been used in exchange or for jewelry in West Africa. These rings were made from various metals including silver, brass, and copper. Due to limited information about the origins of the ring money in the National Numismatic Collection it is not possible to determine if this specific object was used as a medium of exchange, worn as jewelry, or produced as a replica.

Ring money, West Africa

National Museum of American History
The phrase ring money refers to metal rings that may have been used in exchange or for jewelry in West Africa. These rings were made from various metals including silver, brass, and copper. Due to limited information about the origins of the ring money in the National Numismatic Collection it is not possible to determine if this specific object was used as a medium of exchange, worn as jewelry, or produced as a replica.

Ring money, West Africa

National Museum of American History
The phrase ring money refers to metal rings that may have been used in exchange or for jewelry in West Africa. These rings were made from various metals including silver, brass, and copper. Due to limited information about the origins of the ring money in the National Numismatic Collection it is not possible to determine if this specific object was used as a medium of exchange, worn as jewelry, or produced as a replica.

Ring money, West Africa

National Museum of American History
The phrase ring money refers to metal rings that may have been used in exchange or for jewelry in West Africa. These rings were made from various metals including silver, brass, and copper. Due to limited information about the origins of the ring money in the National Numismatic Collection it is not possible to determine if this specific object was used as a medium of exchange, worn as jewelry, or produced as a replica.

Spear money, West Africa

National Museum of American History
Various West African communities produced metal currency in the shapes of spears and other weapons for specific kinds of exchange, such as ceremonial payments for marriages (bridewealth). They were made from a range of metals including iron, copper, brass, and bronze. While they were typically not designed for use, they could be melted down and transformed into weapons, tools, or ornaments.

Ring money, Nigeria

National Museum of American History
The phrase ring money refers to metal rings that may have been used in exchange or for jewelry in West Africa. These rings were made from various metals including silver, brass, and copper. Due to limited information about the origins of the ring money in the National Numismatic Collection it is not possible to determine if this specific object was used as a medium of exchange, worn as jewelry, or produced as a replica.

Ankle money, Cameroon

National Museum of American History
The phrase ankle money refers to metal rings that may have been used in exchange or for jewelry in West Africa. These rings were made from various metals including silver, brass, and copper. Due to limited information about the origins of the ankle money in the National Numismatic Collection it is not possible to determine if this specific object was used as a medium of exchange, worn as jewelry, or produced as a replica.

Ring money, Nigeria

National Museum of American History
The phrase ring money refers to metal rings that may have been used in exchange or for jewelry in West Africa. These rings were made from various metals including silver, brass, and copper. Due to limited information about the origins of the ring money in the National Numismatic Collection it is not possible to determine if this specific object was used as a medium of exchange, worn as jewelry, or produced as a replica.

Spear money, Cameroon

National Museum of American History
Various West African communities produced metal currency in the shapes of spears and other weapons for specific kinds of exchange, such as ceremonial payments for marriages (bridewealth). They were made from a range of metals including iron, copper, brass, and bronze. While they were typically not designed for use, they could be melted down and transformed into weapons, tools, or ornaments.

Currency

NMNH - Anthropology Dept.
Set of 3 pieces of metal, bent in a U shape

Ring money, Cameroon

National Museum of American History
The phrase ring money refers to metal rings that may have been used in exchange or for jewelry in West Africa. These rings were made from various metals including silver, brass, and copper. Due to limited information about the origins of the ring money in the National Numismatic Collection it is not possible to determine if this specific object was used as a medium of exchange, worn as jewelry, or produced as a replica.

Hoe Money (Jembe), Nigeria

National Museum of American History
Many west African communities produced metal currency in the shapes of farming tools for specific kinds of exchange, such as ceremonial payments for marriages (bridewealth). They were made from a range of metals including iron, copper, brass, and bronze. While they were not designed for use in agricultural activities, they could be melted down and transformed into functional farming tools, weapons, or ornaments.

Needle money, southern Nigeria

National Museum of American History
These tiny arrow-shaped pieces of iron are from southern Nigeria. Little is known about their use in exchange, but they are thought to have had a very low market value similar to a cowrie shell.

Bar currency

National Museum of African Art
Iron currency ingot with ovoid center and with extended tapered ends.

Blade currency

National Museum of African Art
Iron T-form blade currency.

Hoe currency

National Museum of African Art
Flat iron currency with bat-like form and a thin "tail" end. This object has been forged with a pronounced mid-rib. Old iron oxide surface.

Hoe currency

National Museum of African Art
Iron currency in the form of a trowel with a convex curve, two sharp corners at the wide end tapering forward into slightly rounded tip. The edge of the wide end has an upright perpindicular "tail" piece necked with an anchor-shaped head located midway between the corners. Old iron oxide patina.

Hoe currency

National Museum of African Art
Iron hoe currency with a broad, rounded trowel head and a stem terminating in a necked, anchor-shaped finial. Diagonal cross-hatched hammer marks are evident and there is an overall oxide patina.

Hoe currency

National Museum of African Art
Iron currency combining shapes of a hoe blade and a spearhead, in a flat triangular trowel form with a narrow shaft and a long thin stem terminating in an anchor-shaped finial. There is decorative filing on the middle of two edges with a punched finial and a twisted stem. Currency has an overall smoked patination.

Rod currency

National Museum of African Art
Cast ingot rod drawn and bent into a U-shape so that its ends are parallel. Each end is compressed and flattened into the shape of a disk. Surface has forged undulations delivered while drawing the ingot to its final shape. Dark brown stable smoked patina with some highlights from wear.

Hoe currency

National Museum of African Art
Thin iron currency with flaring, rounded top and tapering, pointed bottom with an overall dark patina.
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