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Vineyard March

National Museum of American History

poster

National Museum of American History

Boycott Gallo

National Museum of American History

poster

National Museum of American History

Viva la Causa! Nosotros Venceremos!

National Museum of American History

Wanted! by Cesar Chavez

National Museum of American History

poster

National Museum of American History

Boycott National

National Museum of American History

Poster, Si Se Puede Boycott Lettuce and Grapes

National Museum of American History
Cesar Chavez continued to keep the sweatshop conditions of farm labor in the nation’s eye as he organized the United Farm Workers of America during the 1960s. This UFW poster urged consumers to show their support for the UFW by refusing to buy lettuce and grapes.

Non-Violent Action of UFWOC AFL-CIO

National Museum of American History

Bridge Over Troubled Waters

National Museum of American History

Viva la Revolucion

National Museum of American History

Viva la Revolucion

National Museum of American History

poster

National Museum of American History

Nixon Eats Lettuce

National Museum of American History

Huelga / No Violencia / En Salinas

National Museum of American History

Boycott Grapes--Viva La Causa

National Museum of American History

Teatro Campo "La Huelga"

National Museum of American History

Beneficio Para Los Heulgistas de Cesar Chavez

National Museum of American History

Farmworks Strike To Save Their Union

National Museum of American History

Poster, "Viva la Huelga/ Don't buy Farrah pants!"

National Museum of American History
A green poster with black and white text; "Viva la Huelga/ Don't buy Farrah pants!" In the 1970s, garment unions represented about 850,000 workers out of a total industry work force of 1.3 million. Membership declined rapidly as businesses moved offshore and into the non-union South and Southwest. In 1995, garment unions with a combined membership of about 335,000 merged to form the Union of Needletrades, Industrial & Textile Employees (UNITE). Organizing new workers has been a major priority.

United Farmworkers Poster

National Museum of American History
Cesar Estrada Chavez, the founder of the United Farm Workers of America, is one of the most recognized Latino civil rights leaders in the United States. A Mexican American born in Yuma, Arizona, his family lost their small farm in the Great Depression (1930s). Like many Americans, they joined the migration to California and worked for low wages in its great agricultural fields. The agricultural industry in the West was a modern, market-driven phenomenon. In 1965, the United Farm Workers of America, led by Cesar Chavez and Dolores Huerta, began its five-year Delano grape strike against area grape growers for equal wages for foreign workers. Filipino and Mexican Americans who labored in California vineyards were suddenly visible in the eyes of American consumers. The movement to boycott table grapes mobilized students and educated consumers across America. The text on this poster, printed around 1970, describes Chavez's vision of political and economic emancipation for farm workers. La Causa, or The Cause, as it was known among Mexican Americans, was the political and artistic touchstone of the Chicano movement.

Oral history interview with Mel Casas, 1996 August 14 and 16

Archives of American Art
Transcript 66 pages

An interview of Mel Casas conducted 1996 August 14-16, by Paul Karlstrom, for the Archives of American Art.

Casas discusses his current work - dipped acrylic paintings in which technique and material become the subject; his involvement with Chicano art political issues and his own experience as a Mexican-American; a discussion of his family background; art education; early Abstract Expressionist painting; a shift to figuration; thirty years teaching at San Antonio College; the Chicano "movimiento"; and Chicano art and key figures, including Carlos Almaraz and Carmen Lomas Garza.

Oral history interview with Gilbert Sanchez Lujan, 1997 Nov. 7-17

Archives of American Art
Transcript: 104 p.

An interview of Gilbert Lujan conducted 1997 Nov. 7-17, by Jeffrey Rangel, for the Archives of American Art, in Los Angeles, Calif. and La Mesa, N.M.

Sanchez Lujan discusses his growing up in a rural community, East Los Angeles, and Mexico; how early experiences and changes in culture have affected his art and developed his interest in history and politics; his attraction to black culture and the relationship of art as a medium for inter-ethnic interaction where politics and human nature create divisions; his understanding of racial segregation and apartheid in California society; coming into consciousness as a Chicano; and his collaboration and the formation of Los Four with Roberto de la Rocha, Carlos Almaraz, and Frank Romero.
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