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Method Man

National Museum of American History

Method Man

National Museum of American History

Palmer Method

National Museum of American History

Carlisle Method

National Museum of American History

Palmer Method

National Museum of American History

Belts, Method of Lacing

National Museum of American History

Method Man Sampler CD

National Museum of American History
Various artists. Method Man Sampler CD (Def Jam (A)-566 471-2). Compact disc. This is a Collector's Edition Def Jam sampler compact disc featuring Method Man [Clifford M. Smith Jr.] on the cover.

Method Man Sampler Tape

National Museum of American History
Various artists. Method Man Sampler Tape (Def Jam DEF-191-4/2). Cassette format. This is a Collector's Edition Def Jam sampler tape featuring Method Man [Clifford M. Smith Jr.] on the cover.

Collection method for barnacles

Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute

Palmer Method Honor Writing

National Museum of American History

Rabies Vaccine - Semple Method

National Museum of American History

Speak French - Brochès Method

National Museum of American History
Speak French - Brochès Method (parts 1 and 2). (Brochephone), with booklet.

Speak French - Brochès Method

National Museum of American History
Speak French - Brochès Method (parts 3 and 4). (Brochephone), with booklet.

Set of Sheets, Amsler's Method

National Museum of American History
This undated stapled set of sheetsis a typescript describing Amsler's method for determining the polar moments of inertia of a solid of revolution by the use of the integrator.

Relates to integrator 1978.1095.01.

Method of using baren i

National Museum of American History
Drawing which demonstrates method of using a baren in Japanese woodblockprinting. Published in Tokuno essay on Japanese woodcutting and wood-cut printing, edited by S. R. Koehler for SI Annual Report for 1892.

Method of using baren ii

National Museum of American History
Drawing which demonstrates the method of using a baren in Japanese woodblock printing. Published in Tokuno essay on Japanese woodcutting and wood-cut printing, edited by S. R. Koehler for SI Annual Report for 1892.

Method and style in restoration

Smithsonian Libraries
Signed: Christian Rohlfing.

Catalog of an exhibition held 14 October-17 November, 1961.

Method of Boarding Boats 1890

National Anthropological Archives
Black and white photoprint on paper mount in album

Non-Native Man and Woman, Passengers, in Large Basket Attached to Pully System Being Transferred From Ship to Tug at Sea

"American Method in Astronomical Observation"

National Museum of American History
From its infancy, timekeeping has depended on astronomy. The motion of celestial bodies relative to the rotating Earth provided the most precise measure of time until the mid-twentieth century, when quartz and atomic clocks proved more constant. Until that time, mechanical observatory clocks were set and continuously corrected to agree with astronomical observations.

The application of electricity to observatory timepieces in the late 1840s revolutionized the way American astronomers noted the exact movement of celestial events. U.S. Coast Survey teams devised a method to telegraph clock beats, both within an observatory and over long distances, and to record both the beats and the moment of observation simultaneously. British astronomers dubbed it the "American method of astronomical observation" and promptly adopted it themselves.

Transmitting clock beats by telegraph not only provided astronomers with a means of recording the exact moment of astronomical observations but also gave surveyors a means of determining longitude. Because the Earth rotates on its axis every twenty-four hours, longitude and time are equivalent (fifteen degrees of longitude equals one hour).

In 1849 William Cranch Bond, then director of the Harvard College Observatory, devised an important improvement for clocks employed in the "American method." He constructed several versions of break-circuit devices—electrical contracts and insulators attached to the mechanical clock movement—for telegraphing clock beats once a second. The Bond regulator shown here incorporates such a device. Bond's son Richard designed the accompanying drum chronograph, an instrument that touched a pen to a paper-wrapped cylinder to record both the beats of the clock and the instant of a celestial event, signaled when an observer pressed a telegraph key.

Rabies Vaccine, Semple Method - Lederle

National Museum of American History

patent model, escapement, method of adjusting

National Museum of American History

Methods for Holding the Sky Together - Method 1

National Air and Space Museum
The works depict kaleidoscopically rendered clouds and geometrical line patterns connecting the clouds together. Merrell’s states, “These prints are part of a series that attempts to visualize the process of extrapolating information from a complex natural system. In these images, the sky has been kaleidoscopically rendered as a kind of sublime projection screen – a place of infinite interpretive possibility. Onto the subtle complexity of the sky an ordering system is projected as an attempt to render diagrammatically the relationships and complexities of sunlight, atmosphere, and clouds.”

Artist Clayton Merrell grew up in Pittsburgh, PA, and Puerto Ordaz, Venezuela. He studied painting and printmaking at Brigham Young University and the Yale School of Art, where he earned an MFA in 1995. He received a Fulbright Grant to Oaxaca, Mexico in 1996-97. His work is exhibited and collected widely, with recent exhibitions at: The American Embassy in Belmopan, Belize; Slow Gallery, Chicago; Concept Gallery, Pittsburgh PA; The Roswell Museum and Art Center, Roswell NM; the A+D Gallery, Chicago; and the Chautauqua Institution, Chautauqua NY. He has received numerous awards and grants and is currently an Associate Professor of Art at Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh PA.
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