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Masai Mara

National Museum of American History

Masai Mara

National Museum of American History

Masai Spear 2

NMNH - Anthropology Dept.

× Colmanara Masai Red

Smithsonian Gardens

× Colmanara Masai Red

Smithsonian Gardens

Shield, For Mannequin Of Masai Man

NMNH - Anthropology Dept.
Plaster mannequin depicting African Masai man. 9-1964, mannequin itself was condemned and turned over to Naval Historical Museum. A leaf-shaped leather and wood shield apparently used with mannequin while on display was retained in the Anthropology collections under this catalogue number.

Masai Giraffe at National Zoological Park

Smithsonian Institution Archives
Requested from Office of Printing and Photographic Services (OPPS) by Customer Service Section (formerly Sales), OPPS.

Scientific name: [Giraffa tippelskirchi]

Masai Giraffes at National Zoological Park

Smithsonian Institution Archives
Requested from Office of Printing and Photographic Services (OPPS) by Customer Service Section (formerly Sales), OPPS.

Scientific name: [Giraffa tippelskirchi]

Young Masai Giraffe at National Zoological Park

Smithsonian Institution Archives
Requested from Office of Printing and Photographic Services (OPPS) by Customer Service Section (formerly Sales), OPPS.

Scientific name: [Giraffa tippelskirchi]

Masai Giraffes at National Zoological Park

Smithsonian Institution Archives
Requested from Office of Printing and Photographic Services (OPPS) by Customer Service Section (formerly Sales), OPPS.

Scientific name: [Giraffa tippelskirchi]

Major Loss of Wildlife in Kenya’s Masai Mara

Smithsonian Magazine

Even if you don’t recognize the name of Kenya’s Masai Mara National Reserve, you will be familiar with it from the thousands of photos and plentiful video showing the sweeping landscapes and well-known creatures—including lions, wildebeests, giraffes and hyenas. Now comes news, in a study in the Journal of Zoology, that there are far fewer of some of those animals than just 15 years ago.

Scientists rigorously monitored seven ungulate (hoofed) species—giraffes, hartebeest, impala, warthogs, topis, waterbuck and zebras—between 1989 and 2003. Abundance of all the species except for zebras “declined markedly and persistently throughout the reserve during this period,” the scientists write.

What happened?

The Maasai people have traditionally been semi-nomadic herders, and a lifestyle in which they rarely consumed wild animals let them coexist with the Mara’s wildlife. However, in recent decades many of the Maasai have established more permanent settlements on the edge of the reserve, creating ranchland and cultivating crops. People sometimes allow their livestock to graze in the reserve itself, though it is illegal. There the domesticated animals displace the wildlife and degrade the land. In addition, land cultivation has resulted in less habitat for wild animals. And poaching, mostly by poor subsistence farmers, has also taken a toll.

The researchers warn that settlements near the reserve are expanding faster than ones farther away and that this will bring more conflict between the people and wildlife.

The Masai : their language and folklore / by A.C. Hollis; with introduction by Sir Charles Eliot

Smithsonian Libraries
English and Masai.

Also available online.

AFA copy has bookplate: Smithsonian Institution Libraries. The Russell E. Train Africana Collection.

Elecresource

Masai-Uniuwa in War Costume with Gun and Maiden in Native Dress near Rock Formations n.d

National Anthropological Archives
[on 06308300 Also Called "Kala-Qui-A"]

Black and white gelatin glass negative

Masai-Uniuwa in War Costume with Gun and Maiden in Native Dress near Rock Formations n.d

National Anthropological Archives
[on 06308300 Also Called "Kala-Qui-A"] Copy Negative

Black and white gelatin glass negative

Spear

NMNH - Anthropology Dept.
From card: "E. Africa. Found in collections with no number. Identified as Masai type by Dr. Alan Jacobs 3/4/66."

Shield

NMNH - Anthropology Dept.

Elephants

National Museum of American History

Elephants

National Museum of American History

Zebras

National Museum of American History

Elephants

National Museum of American History

War Cloth "Mai Bere"

NMNH - Anthropology Dept.
From card: "Old [19th or early 20th century exhibit] label: This pattern of cloth is used exclusively in trade with the Masai Negroes [sic]; they prefer it to other varieties. The red stripe in this sample is narrower than usual."

Reference: Abbott, W. L. 1891. Ethnological collections in the U. S. National Museum from Kilima-Njaro, East Africa. In: Report of the United States National Museum for the year ending June 30, 1891. pp.381-428, 24 figs., https://www.si.edu/es/object/SILSRO_82175 . On p. 405 of the publication this object is described: "War Cloth (Maibere). For trade with the Masai all cloth must be made up into maibere. The red stripe in this specimen is too narrow and therefore was rejected in trade. Masai tribe; Mount Kilima-Njaro, East Africa. In dress, implements, and in weapons, fashion reigns supreme among these fastidious aborigines. Frequently, an assagai offered in traffic will be rejected with the remark "We have not used that pattern for ten years.""

Lions

National Museum of American History
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