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Valentine to Mary Henry

Smithsonian Archives - History Div
A valentine sent to Mary Henry from an unknown suitor. He includes a love poem and signs the note "Valentine."

Transcript of poem: "To Mary Henry/Oh, were I a bird that could sing all the day,/I would fly to her bower to carol my [lay?]!/Or were I a breath of the soft scented air,/I would waft all my sweets to her bower so fair!/Or were I a thought could awaken a smile,/I would rest on her lip all her woes to beguile./I would make my bright throne in her sorrowing heart,/And each impulse that grew should its pleasures impart./Oh, were I a strain of some melody sweet,/I would steal to her chamber her slumber to greet./Or were I a dream could recall to her mind/The pleasures and joys she has long left behind./I would [hover?] around in the stillness of night and her visions of sleep should be joyously bright./I would kiss from her cheek every envious tear,/and guard her fond bosom from sorrow and fear./"Valentine""

Mary Henry, Daughter of Secretary Henry

Smithsonian Archives - History Div
Photographic portrait of Mary Anna Henry (1834-1903), daughter of first Smithsonian Secretary Joseph Henry (1846-1878) and Harriet Alexander Henry. Mary kept a diary of life at the Smithsonian during the Civil War years and organized biographical materials about her father, after his death.

Mary Henry Diary, 1858-1863

Smithsonian Archives - History Div
Diary of Mary Henry, daughter of the first Smithsonian Secretary Joseph Henry. This diary spans the years of 1858-1863 and covers life in the Washington, D.C. Mary lived with her family in the Smithsonian Institution Building, or Castle, where she was the at the center of D.C. events. Her entries include details of visitors to the Castle, her father's work with the Smithsonian, and the beginning years of the Civil War.

Mary Henry Diary, 1864-1868

Smithsonian Archives - History Div
Diary of Mary Henry, daughter of the first Smithsonian Secretary Joseph Henry. This diary spans the years of 1864-1868 and covers life in the Washington, D.C. Mary lived with her family in the Smithsonian Institution Building, or Castle, and witnessed the tumultuous years of the Civil War, its impact on Washington and the reconstruction of the country. Her entries include details of visitors to the Castle, her father's work with the Smithsonian, and events of the Civil War.

Joseph Henry's Daughters Caroline & Mary

Smithsonian Archives - History Div
Small prints file

Joseph Henry's daughters Caroline (1839-1920) & Mary Anna (1834-1903). Joseph Henry (1797-1878) was a physicist and the first Secretary of the Smithsonian Institution from 1846 to 1878. This photograph shows Caroline seated, resting her arm on a table, and Mary standing to her right.

Mary Henry Diary, June 3, 1861

Smithsonian Archives - History Div
For the fully digitized diaries see negative numbers SIA2013-02704 through SIA2013-02816 (Diary 1858-1863) and negative numbers SIA2013-01937 through SIA2013-02126 (Diary 1864-1868).

Entry from the diary of Mary Henry, daughter of Joseph Henry, first Secretary of the Smithsonian Institution, describing the state of events of the country a brink of division. The entry discusses that the church is one of the only links left between the North and South and that fortifications and troops are growing on each side of the division.

Mary Henry Diary Entries on Civil War Hospitals, July 1862

Smithsonian Archives - History Div
For the fully digitized diaries see negative numbers SIA2013-02704 through SIA2013-02816 (Diary 1858-1863) and negative numbers SIA2013-01937 through SIA2013-02126 (Diary 1864-1868).

These diary entries are pages 105-109 in the actual diary.

Entries from the diary of Mary Henry, daughter of Joseph Henry, first Secretary of the Smithsonian Institution, in July 1862. In the entries, Mary describes news about troop movements and gives her impressions of Civil War events. Several of these entries highlight Civil War era make-shift hospitals. Mary writes about preparing bandages for soldiers, benefits to raise money for the hospitals, visiting the hospitals, and meeting wounded soldiers.

Mary Anna Henry Is Born to Joseph and Harriet Henry

Smithsonian Archives - History Div
Selections from Mary Henry's diaries and photographs depicting her family's life in the Smithsonian Castle can be viewed at http://siarchives.si.edu/history/exhibits/documents/mary.htm.

The image below is Mary Henry. For additional images of Mary Henry see Negative Numbers 2002-12181 and 6636-G in the SIRIS.

Reingold, Nathan, ed. The Papers of Joseph Henry, The Albany Years, December 1797 - October 1832, vol. 2. Washington, D.C.: Smithsonian Institution Press, 1975, p. 168.

Moyer, Albert. Joseph Henry: The Rise of an American Scientist. Washington, D.C.: Smithsonian Institution Press, 1997, p. 138.

Joseph Henry's second child, Mary Anna, is born in the winter of 1834 in Princeton, New Jersey. In 1846, Joseph Henry would become the first Secretary of the Smithsonian Institution. After his death, Mary Henry attempted to preserve her father's legacy by compiling and transcribing documents in preparation for a biography of her father. Her diaries were bequeathed to the Smithsonian and include entries on her experiences as a resident of the Smithsonian Castle during the Civil War.

Joseph Henry Letter to Mary Henry (May 30, 1863)

Smithsonian Archives - History Div
2 pages scanned from the edited transcript of the original version and notes in the Joseph Henry Papers Volume 10, pages 314-315 (Document 177).

Letter from Joseph Henry, first Secretary of the Smithsonian Institution, to Mary Henry, his eldest daughter, May 30, 1863. In the letter, Henry describes signalling tests that were carried out from a tower of the Smithsonian Institution Building, or "Castle." Different colored lights were tested for communication with Fort Washington during the Civil War. Henry served as a scientific advisor to President Abraham Lincoln during the war.

Meet Mary Henry and Thaddeus Lowe

National Air and Space Museum
This video was filmed during the National Air and Space Museum's "Mr. Lincoln's Air Force" Family Day on Saturday, June 11, 2011. The event commemorated the 150th anniversary of Thaddeus Lowe's tethered ascent in a gas balloon, which attracted the support of President Lincoln and led to the creation of a balloon corps for the Union Army under Lowe's leadership. In this clip a re-enactor portraying Mary Henry interviews a re-enactor portraying Thaddeus Lowe about his balloon.

Mary Henry Diary Entries, 1863, on Soldier and their Wives

Smithsonian Archives - History Div
For the fully digitized diaries see negative numbers SIA2013-02704 through SIA2013-02816 (Diary 1858-1863) and negative numbers SIA2013-01937 through SIA2013-02126 (Diary 1864-1868).

Entries from the diary of Mary Henry, daughter of Joseph Henry, first Secretary of the Smithsonian Institution, reminiscing about Civil War era generals and their wives who were entertained by her father, Joseph Henry, in the Smithsonian Castle.

Mary Henry Diary Entry Death of William Henry, December 6, 1862

Smithsonian Archives - History Div
For the fully digitized diaries see negative numbers SIA2013-02704 through SIA2013-02816 (Diary 1858-1863) and negative numbers SIA2013-01937 through SIA2013-02126 (Diary 1864-1868).

Entry from the diary of Mary Henry, daughter of Joseph Henry, first Secretary of the Smithsonian Institution, describing the death of her brother William Henry, December 6, 1862.

Eyewitness on the Mall: Mary Henry Tells All

National Air and Space Museum
This video was filmed during the National Air and Space Museum's "Mr. Lincoln's Air Force" Family Day on Saturday, June 11, 2011. The event commemorated the 150th anniversary of Thaddeus Lowe's tethered ascent in a gas balloon, which attracted the support of President Lincoln and led to the creation of a balloon corps for the Union Army under Lowe's leadership. In this clip actresses portraying Mary Henry and Dorothea Dix discuss Mary Henry's journal writing and the Civil War appearance of the City.

Mary Henry Diary Entries, April 1865, Death of President Lincoln

Smithsonian Archives - History Div
For the fully digitized diaries see negative numbers SIA2013-02704 through SIA2013-02816 (Diary 1858-1863) and negative numbers SIA2013-01937 through SIA2013-02126 (Diary 1864-1868).

These diary entries are pages 107-119 in the actual diary.

Entry from the diary of Mary Henry, daughter of Joseph Henry, first Secretary of the Smithsonian Institution, recording her experiences when she heard that President Abraham Lincoln had been shot and then died. She also recorded the reminiscences of Lincoln's deathbed scene as recounted to her by the family's minister, Rev. R. R. Gurley, who had been at Lincoln's bedside. She expresses her concerns over the fate of the nation without Lincoln's guidance.

Mary Henry's Studio in East Range, Smithsonian Institution Building

Smithsonian Archives - History Div
Also negative #46638-A and #1241; resource: Field, Stamm & Ewing. THE CASTLE, AN ILLUSTRATED HISTORY OF THE SMITHSONIAN BUILDING (p. 34)

Studio of Mary Henry, daughter of Joseph Henry, first Secretary of the Smithsonian (1846-1878), in the East Range, of the Smithsonian Institution Building, Castle, c. 1878. The room is filled with paintings, sculptures, easels, a spinning wheel, chairs and tables.

Mary Henry Diary Entries on the First Battle of Manassas, July 1861

Smithsonian Archives - History Div
For the fully digitized diaries see negative numbers SIA2013-02704 through SIA2013-02816 (Diary 1858-1863) and negative numbers SIA2013-01937 through SIA2013-02126 (Diary 1864-1868).

Entry from the diary of Mary Henry, daughter of Joseph Henry, first Secretary of the Smithsonian Institution, describing the First Battle of Manassas, in Virginia, of the United States Civil War. In the entries, Mary describes the troop movements prior to the battle, the battle and its effects in Washington, D.C.

Mary Henry Diary Entry Battle of Gettysburg, July 29 - July 30, 1863

Smithsonian Archives - History Div
For the fully digitized diaries see negative numbers SIA2013-02704 through SIA2013-02816 (Diary 1858-1863) and negative numbers SIA2013-01937 through SIA2013-02126 (Diary 1864-1868).

Entry from the diary of Mary Henry, daughter of Joseph Henry, first Secretary of the Smithsonian Institution, describing the early troop movements leading up to the battle of Gettysburg, the battle itself, and its aftermath.

Mary Henry Diary Entries, January-February 1861, on the Congressional Debates

Smithsonian Archives - History Div
For the fully digitized diaries see negative numbers SIA2013-02704 through SIA2013-02816 (Diary 1858-1863) and negative numbers SIA2013-01937 through SIA2013-02126 (Diary 1864-1868).

Entry from the diary of Mary Henry, daughter of Joseph Henry, first Secretary of the Smithsonian Institution, describing debates in the U.S. Congress prior to the secession of the Southern states. Mary observed the debates from the visitors' gallery.

Mary Henry Diary Entries, January 25-26, 1865, Fire in the Castle

Smithsonian Archives - History Div
For the fully digitized diaries see negative numbers SIA2013-02704 through SIA2013-02816 (Diary 1858-1863) and negative numbers SIA2013-01937 through SIA2013-02126 (Diary 1864-1868).

These diary entries are pages 77-83 in the actual diary.

Entry from the diary of Mary Henry, daughter of Joseph Henry, first Secretary of the Smithsonian Institution, recording her reactions to the destructive fire in the Smithsonian Institution Building or Castle on January 24, 1865, and her visit to the damaged areas on the following day.

Mary Henry Diary Entry Visit to the Navy Yard to See an Ironclad, November 20, 1863

Smithsonian Archives - History Div
For the fully digitized diaries see negative numbers SIA2013-02704 through SIA2013-02816 (Diary 1858-1863) and negative numbers SIA2013-01937 through SIA2013-02126 (Diary 1864-1868).

Entry from the diary of Mary Henry, daughter of Joseph Henry, first Secretary of the Smithsonian Institution, which details her visit to the Navy Yard to see an Ironclad, November 20, 1863.

Mary Henry Diary Entry Foundling Left at the Castle Door, June 1, 1863

Smithsonian Archives - History Div
For the fully digitized diaries see negative numbers SIA2013-02704 through SIA2013-02816 (Diary 1858-1863) and negative numbers SIA2013-01937 through SIA2013-02126 (Diary 1864-1868).

Entry from the diary of Mary Henry, daughter of Joseph Henry, first Secretary of the Smithsonian Institution, which details her family discovering a foundling who was left at the Castle door, June 1, 1863.

Mary Henry Diary Entries on Dorothea Dix and Fort Sumter Attack

Smithsonian Archives - History Div
For the fully digitized diaries see negative numbers SIA2013-02704 through SIA2013-02816 (Diary 1858-1863) and negative numbers SIA2013-01937 through SIA2013-02126 (Diary 1864-1868).

Entry from the diary of Mary Henry, daughter of Joseph Henry, first Secretary of the Smithsonian Institution, reminiscing about her friend the social activist Dorothea Dix and her work creating Civil War era hospitals to care for injured soldiers. Mary also discusses the attack on Fort Sumter.

Mary Henry Diary Entry End of the Civil War, April 3-10, 1865

Smithsonian Archives - History Div
For the fully digitized diaries see negative numbers SIA2013-02704 through SIA2013-02816 (Diary 1858-1863) and negative numbers SIA2013-01937 through SIA2013-02126 (Diary 1864-1868).

These diary entries are pages 95-100 in the actual diary.

Entry from the diary of Mary Henry, daughter of Joseph Henry, first Secretary of the Smithsonian Institution, describing the end of the Civil War, April 3-10, 1865. The entry details celebrations occurring in Washington, D.C. and General Robert E. Lee's surrender to General Ulysses S. Grant.

Mary Henry Diary Entry on Watching Troop Movements, July 16, 1861

Smithsonian Archives - History Div
For the fully digitized diaries see negative numbers SIA2013-02704 through SIA2013-02816 (Diary 1858-1863) and negative numbers SIA2013-01937 through SIA2013-02126 (Diary 1864-1868).

Entry from the diary of Mary Henry, daughter of Joseph Henry, first Secretary of the Smithsonian Institution, which describes watching the troops marching into Virginia a few days before the First Battle of Manassas of the United States Civil War, from atop the Smithsonian Institution Building's towers.
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