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Golden Lion Marmoset, NZP

Smithsonian Archives - History Div
Featured in TORCH, October 1978

A golden lion marmoset from the National Zoological Park. The Zoo has a successful breeding program for this endangered species.

Money and Marmoset

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
Sketch of a monkey and marmoset.

Golden Lion Marmoset Conference Partipants

Smithsonian Institution Archives
Digital contact sheet available.

Requested from Photographic Services Division by National Zoological Park.

Participants in the Golden Lion Marmoset Conference at the Lion's Den, the cafeteria at the National Zoological Park.

Golden Lion Marmoset Conference Partipants

Smithsonian Institution Archives
Digital contact sheet available.

Requested from Photographic Services Division by National Zoological Park.

Participants in the Golden Lion Marmoset Conference at the Lion's Den, the cafeteria at the National Zoological Park.

Golden Lion Marmoset Conference Partipants

Smithsonian Institution Archives
Digital contact sheet available.

Requested from Photographic Services Division by National Zoological Park.

Group portrait of participants in the Golden Lion Marmoset Conference at the National Zoological Park.

Cebid sp.

NMNH - Vertebrate Zoology - Mammals Division

Is obesity predestined at infancy? Marmoset study may help scientists find out.

Smithsonian Insider

A new study of marmosets, small South American monkeys, indicates that obesity may begin very early in life and suggests that marmosets may be a helpful model for obesity in humans.

The post Is obesity predestined at infancy? Marmoset study may help scientists find out. appeared first on Smithsonian Insider.

Digestion in the common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus), a gummivore-frugivore

Smithsonian Libraries
Wild common marmosets (Callithrix jacchus) feed on fruits, insects, and gums, all of which provide different digestive challenges. Much of the ingested mass of fruits consists of seeds. In general, seeds represent indigestible bulk to marmosets and could inhibit feeding if they are not eliminated rapidly. In contrast, gums are beta-linked polysaccharides that require microbial fermentation. Their digestion would benefit from an extended residence time within the gut. Earlier research found that mean retention time (MRT) for a liquid digestive marker (cobalt EDTA) was significantly longer than MRT for a particulate marker (chromium-mordanted fiber), suggesting that common marmosets preferentially retain liquid digesta. We conducted two four-day-long digestion trials on 13 individually housed adult common marmosets fed a single-item, purified diet in order to examine the relations among MRT of cobalt EDTA and chromium-mordanted fiber, food dry matter intake (DMI), and apparent digestibility of dry matter (ADDM). We compared the MRT values with the data from the previous study mentioned above and a study using polystyrene beads. There were no significant correlations among MRT, ADDM, or DMI, although increases in DMI between trials were associated with decreases in MRT. ADDM was consistent within individuals between trials; but the mean values ranged from 75.0 to 83.4% among individuals. We found no difference in MRT between the liquid (17.5±1.6 hr) and particulate (17.9±1.4 hr) markers. Although these values were not significantly different than found previously, the MRT for chromium-mordanted fiber tended to be longer. This probably reflects the relatively small size of the chromium-mordanted fiber particles used in this study. An inverse relationship between particle size and MRT was evident; the mean MRT of polysterene beads, the largest marker, was only 8.3±1.5 hr. Marmosets appear to retain liquids and small particles within the gut longer than large particles. Am. J. Primatol. 71:957-963, 2009. © 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

Cebuella pygmaea (Pigmy Marmoset), Barro Colorado Island, Panama, 1958-1961, 1963

Smithsonian Field Book Project
The notes contain M. Moynihan's observations of Cebuella pygmaea (Pigmy Marmoset), 1958-1961, 1963. Pages are numbered. Includes a variety of note formats. Includes dated entries with location and type. Observations describe individual and groups of primates over extended periods of time, indicating information about their sex, size of population observed, interactions, and captivity. Includes notations indicated by pattern. Locations include Barro Colorado Island, Panama.

Callithrix jacchus (Tufted ear marmoset), London Zoo; Paris Zoo, 1959, 1961

Smithsonian Field Book Project
Notes are M. Moynihan's observations of Callithrix jacchus (Tufted ear marmoset) at London Zoo and Paris Zoo, 1959, 1961. Includes four pages of notes. They are headed with date, location, and type. Observations record time of day, location, appearance, calls, individual and interpersonal behavior, sex, and effect of animal keeper's presence.

Golden Marmosets and Jaguar Cub

Smithsonian Institution Archives
Digital contact sheet available.

Requested from Photographic Services Division by National Zoological Park.

Golden marmosets and jaguar cub (three months old) at the National Zoological Park.

Obese marmosets are more developmentally advanced as infants, study shows

Smithsonian Insider

Marmosets on track for obesity appeared to be more efficient in their feeding behavior. “Although all animals consumed the same amount of liquid, the ones […]

The post Obese marmosets are more developmentally advanced as infants, study shows appeared first on Smithsonian Insider.

Leontideus rosalia (Golden Marmosets), Paris Zoo; Washington Zoo, 1958-1960

Smithsonian Field Book Project
The notes document M. Moynihan's observations of Leontideus rosalia (Golden Marmosets), October 1958 and September 1961. Pages are numbered. Entries are headed with location, date, and type. Observations include time of day, appearance, behavior, cries of individuals and their interactions with others, diagram representing vocalizations, and discussions with animal keeper. Notations are indicated by pattern. Locations include Paris Zoo and Washington Zoo.

The Development of Obesity Begins at an Early Age in Captive Common Marmosets (Callithrix jacchus)

Smithsonian Libraries
Animal models to study the causes and consequences of obesity during infancy in humans would be valuable. In this study, we examine the patterns of fat mass gain from birth to 12 months in common marmosets (Callithrix jacchus). Lean and fat mass was measured by quantitative magnetic resonance at 1, 2, 6, and 12 months for 31 marmosets, 15 considered Normal and 16 considered Fat (>14% body fat) at 12 months. Animals were fed either the regular colony diet mix or a high-fat variation. Subjects classified as Fat at 12 months already had greater lean mass (198.4 ± 6.2 g vs. 174.0 ± 6.8 g, P = 0.013) and fat mass (45.5 ± 5.0 g vs. 24.9 ± 3.4 g, P = .002) by 6 months. Body mass did not differ between groups prior to 6 months, however, by 1 month, Fat infants had greater percent body fat. Percent body fat decreased between 1 and 12 months in Normal subjects; in Fat subjects, it increased. The high-fat diet was associated with body fat >14% at 6 months (P = 0.049), but not at 12 months. This shift was due to three subjects on the normal diet changing from Normal to Fat between 6 and 12 months. Although maternal prepregnancy adiposity did not differ, overall, between Normal and Fat subjects, the subjects Normal at 6 and Fat at 12 months all had Fat mothers. Therefore, diet and maternal obesity appear to have potentially independent effects that may also vary with developmental age. Although birth weight did not differ between groups, it was associated with fat mass gain from 1 to 6 months in animals with >14% body fat at 6 months of age (r = 0.612, P = 0.026); but not in 6-month-old animals with <14% body fat (r = –0.012, P = 0.964). Excess adiposity in captive marmosets develops by 1 month. Birth weight is associated with adiposity in animals vulnerable to obesity.

Enrichment for Great Apes and Other Primates

SI Center for Learning and Digital Access
Webpage describing how the Zoo designs environments and activities to stimulate the primates and encourage them to exercise behaviors typical to their lives in the wild. Focuses especially on gorillas and orangutans.

Sapajus apella

NMNH - Vertebrate Zoology - Mammals Division

Saimiri sciureus

NMNH - Vertebrate Zoology - Mammals Division
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