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Found 3,716 Resources

"Green Mountain Rifle Powder" Tin

National Museum of American History
Flattened oval, japanned retail tin bearing a large, circular, lithographed, pale blue paper label on one side for "GREEN MOUNTAIN RIFLE POWDER" and "LYMAN FENTON & C\O" around what appears to be a view of lions or leopards in a palm tree-filled landscape. Friction-fit, low-domed, stepped cover fits over a double-collared opening at top center of the container, which is made in three pieces, the body has a folded vertical seam at side, and the low-domed, stepped shoulder and slightly concave bottom have soft-soldered folded edges. Cover and collars have soft-soldered lapped seams.

"Mountain over Hintersee," near Berchtesgaden, Bavaria

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
Verso: Southern part of the lake

"Saltarello Romano," Dancing Peasants In The Neighborhood of Rome

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
A dancing pair with similar poses as in plate 1 of the "Raccolta" of 1809; but the boy has his hands akimbo, and the girl the right one. The tambourin is played by a girl, standing with a boy at right. A man and a woman are seated at left; a boy leans upon the legs of his father. Mountainous landscape.

"Swissair' Services Aeriens

National Air and Space Museum
"SWISSAIR" SERVICES AERIENS Multicolor commercial aviation print. Plane flies over a mountainous landscape; cities served: Basel, Geneva, Zurich. Partial text: ""Swissair' Services Aeriens"; Lithograph.

Fly Now: The National Air and Space Museum Poster Collection

Throughout their history, posters have been a significant means of mass communication, often with striking visual effect. Wendy Wick Reaves, the Smithsonian Portrait Gallery Curator of Prints and Drawings, comments that "sometimes a pictorial poster is a decorative masterpiece-something I can't walk by without a jolt of aesthetic pleasure. Another might strike me as extremely clever advertising … But collectively, these 'pictures of persuasion,' as we might call them, offer a wealth of art, history, design, and popular culture for us to understand. The poster is a familiar part of our world, and we intuitively understand its role as propaganda, promotion, announcement, or advertisement."

Reaves' observations are especially relevant for the impressive array of aviation posters in the National Air and Space Museum's 1300+ artifact collection. Quite possibly the largest publicly-held collection of its kind in the United States, the National Air and Space Museum's posters focus primarily on advertising for aviation-related products and activities. Among other areas, the collection includes 19th-century ballooning exhibition posters, early 20th-century airplane exhibition and meet posters, and twentieth-century airline advertisements.

The posters in the collection represent printing technologies that include original lithography, silkscreen, photolithography, and computer-generated imagery. The collection is significant both for its aesthetic value and because it is a unique representation of the cultural, commercial and military history of aviation. The collection represents an intense interest in flight, both public and private, during a significant period of its technological and social development.

"The Stormy Petrel of American Art"

Smithsonian Magazine

Few other artists in the history of 20th-century American art have received such praise and nearly equal condemnation as Rockwell Kent. For some his name may conjure up bold, sweeping landscape paintings of Maine's Monhegan Island, austere renderings of Greenland or spiritually invested depictions of New York State's Adirondack Mountains. Others may recall his dramatic illustrations of Moby Dick, Candide, Beowulf and the works of Chaucer and Shakespeare. Westinghouse, General Electric, Steinway & Sons, Sherwin-Williams and Rolls Royce all capitalized on his renown and creativity. His support of and participation in innumerable unions and causes, such as the International Workers Order and the American Artists' Congress, gave rise to the 1937 New Yorker ditty, "That day will mark a precedent, which brings no news of Rockwell Kent."

Twenty-nine years after his death, Kent has returned with a vengeance. Not since the height of his pre-McCarthyism popularity has so much of his work been available to the public. His own writings Wilderness: A Journal of Quiet Adventure in Alaska, Voyaging Southward from the Strait of Magellan and N by E among them have been reprinted, and several new volumes on his work have been recently released.

And now, for the first time in 40 years, paintings from the "Great Kent Collection" a group of works that the artist gave to the Soviet Union in 1960 have returned to their homeland to be showcased in "The View from Asgaard: Rockwell Kent's Adirondack Legacy" (on display at the Adirondack Museum in Blue Mountain Lake, New York, through October 15) and "Distant Shores: The Odyssey of Rockwell Kent" (at the Norman Rockwell Museum in Stockbridge, Massachusetts, through October 29).

Kent's first love was painting. His work in book illustration, advertising and architectural rendering, and in designing fabrics, metalware, jewelry, murals and ceramic patterns, was primarily a means to make a living, as were his forays into dairy farming, carpentry, home construction and lobster harvesting. A man of boundless energy, Kent was considered "the most versatile man alive" by his friend, the poet Louis Untermeyer. "Sometimes (in spite of the physical evidence)," wrote Untermeyer, "I suspect he is not a person at all, but an Organization. . . ."

"Yukon Tundra in Summer" n.d. Lithograph/Photomechanical

National Anthropological Archives
Published: Petroff, Ivan; "Report on the Population, Industries, & Resources of Ak"; Wash, 1884; Pl VIII

Colored pencil Watercolor lithograph and photomechanical

Lithograph of Painting Showing Three Men in Costume, Paddling Kayak Through Tundra Landscape; Mountains in Distance

(Autumn Mountain Landscape)

Smithsonian American Art Museum

(Landscape)

Smithsonian American Art Museum

(Landscape)

Smithsonian American Art Museum

(Landscape)

Smithsonian American Art Museum

(No Title Given) [drawing] / (photographed by Peter A. Juley & Son)

Archives and Special Collections, Smithsonian American Art Museum
Black-and-white study print (8x10).

Orig. negative: 8x10, Safety, BW.

(No Title Given) [painting] / (photographed by Peter A. Juley & Son)

Archives and Special Collections, Smithsonian American Art Museum
Black-and-white study print (8x10).

Orig. negative: 8x10, Safety, BW.

(No Title Given) [painting] / (photographed by Peter A. Juley & Son)

Archives and Special Collections, Smithsonian American Art Museum
Black-and-white study print (8x10).

Orig. negative: 8x10, Nitrate, BW.

copy 1 negative: 8x10, Safety, BW.

(No Title Given) [painting] / (photographed by Peter A. Juley & Son)

Archives and Special Collections, Smithsonian American Art Museum
Black-and-white study print (8x10).

Orig. negative: 8x10, Nitrate, BW.

copy 1 negative: 8x10, Safety, BW.

(No Title Given) [painting] / (photographed by Peter A. Juley & Son)

Archives and Special Collections, Smithsonian American Art Museum
Black-and-white study print (8x10).

Orig. negative: 8x10, Safety, BW.

(Sketchbook) (Lake of Geneva from Vevey)

Smithsonian American Art Museum

(Sketchbook) At Sierre

Smithsonian American Art Museum

(Sketchbook) Castle at Aigle

Smithsonian American Art Museum
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