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Kansas

Smithsonian Magazine

Kansas

National Portrait Gallery

Kansas

National Museum of American History

Kansas City, Kansas

Smithsonian American Art Museum

Kansas City, Kansas

Smithsonian American Art Museum

Kansas License Plate

National Museum of American History
This Kansas license plate was used around 1924. The state of Kansas first issued license plates in 1913, but didn't put the year on them until 1921. Before then, the state changed the shape and location of the "KAN" abbreviation or changed the color to differentiate between years.

As the number of motor vehicles reached tens of thousands, state and local governments assumed a new power: authorizing vehicles and drivers. In 1901, New York became the first state to register automobiles; by 1918 all states required license plates.

Cedar (Kansas)

NMNH - Mineral Sciences Dept.

Miller (Kansas)

NMNH - Mineral Sciences Dept.

Marion (Kansas)

NMNH - Mineral Sciences Dept.

Marion (Kansas)

NMNH - Mineral Sciences Dept.

University of Kansas

National Museum of American History

Kansas City Chiefs

National Museum of American History

Kansas City Chiefs

National Museum of American History

Kansas City Royals

National Museum of American History

Kansas City Royals

National Museum of American History

Kansas City Royals

National Museum of American History

Kansas City Royals patch

National Museum of American History

Kansas City Royals baseball cap

National Museum of American History

Kansas City Athletics / Jim Finigan

National Museum of American History

Common injurious insects of Kansas

Smithsonian Libraries
Also available online.

Elecresource

Contributions for Kansas

National Museum of American History

Kansas City Railways Company Token

National Museum of American History
The Scovill Manufacturing Company of Waterbury, Connecticut produced this transportation token during the early 20th century. The Scovill Company was established in 1802 as a button manufacturer and is still in business today. Scovill was an early industrial American innovator, adapting armory manufacturing processes to mass-produce a variety of consumer goods including buttons, daguerreotype mats, medals, coins, and transportation tokens. The reverse bears the signature of J.A. Harder on the center strip.

Obverse: Image of four stars. The legend reads: FULL/K.C. RYS. CO./FARE

Reverse: Three stars at the top. The legend reads: J.A. Harder/TREASURER

Grain Elevator, Kansas

Smithsonian American Art Museum

20c Kansas single

National Postal Museum
mint
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