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Food

NMNH - Anthropology Dept.

Food ?

NMNH - Anthropology Dept.

Food Offering

NMNH - Anthropology Dept.

Food

National Museum of American History

Food

National Museum of American History

Food, Modified Food

Smithsonian Magazine

Food Mixer

National Museum of American History
Handheld mixer, possibly a whisk or masher, consisting of thin wire, diamond-pattern mesh or netting attached to a slightly concave frame made of two heavier gauge wires twisted at sides and mounted inside a turned wooden handle. No marks.

Cuisinart Food Processor

National Museum of American History
Chuck Williams, the founder of a successful chain of retail stores (Williams-Sonoma) specializing in kitchenware and household furnishings, began his work in Sonoma, California in 1953. He brought professional and restaurant quality cookware, marketed through mail order catalogues and high design stores, to an American market that looked beyond its domestic roots for food and cookware. Williams, a great home cook, used the products he brought to an American audience including his original Cuisinart and several other models. Williams eventually gave this one, c. 1978, to the Smithsonian.

American inventor Carl Sontheimer developed the Cuisinart food processor as a more domestic version of the semi-industrial French Robot Coupe. In contrast to classic French techniques that call for everything to be prepared painstakingly by hand, the food processor quickly dispatches all the beating, pounding, mixing, mincing, and sieving common to “La Technique.”

Sontheimer gave Cuisinarts to Julia Child and to Chuck Williams, who began selling the machine in his stores. When Julia Child demonstrated cooking around the country, she carried her new favorite cooking tool with her, increasing its exposure to home cooks. When Julia used it, cooks then demanded it, and entrepreneurs like Williams provided these new things that Julia and others had inspired new cooks to use. The regularly improved versions have been best-selling kitchen appliances since their introduction in the early 1970’s.

Food Tattoos

Smithsonian Magazine

Food Box

NMNH - Anthropology Dept.

Food mold

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
Decorated in repoussé with the figure of a lobster.

Food mold

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
Decorated in repoussé with the figure of a lobster.

Food mold

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
Decorated in repoussé with snails and a turtle.

Food mold

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
Decorated on bottom with repoussé trophy composed of helmet of laurel; on sides, with repoussé hemicylinders.

Food mold

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
Concave mold, top fitted with high rim, for support, enframing repoussé figure of a lamb. Side gadrooned in repoussé. Base edged with twisted molding, border inscribed with "ELISABET HALDERE EN[backwards]DE 1656" (upside down as if decoration for mouth of a bowl); fitted with a ring for hanging.

Food Co-Op Bag

National Museum of American History
This canvas, Food Co-op bag, and the experiences of its donor, recall an important era in American food history—the 1960s and ‘70s, when food became a tool of resistance, consciousness-raising, and self-expression. Activists, many of them students, embraced the motto “You are what you eat,” and rejected food that was mass-produced, distributed, and marketed by large, multi-national corporations. They raised questions about food safety, nutrition, and environmental impacts, while advocating new models for producing food locally and organically, and for sharing and buying it on a community-oriented scale.

Judy C., the donor of this bag, was starting graduate school in 1978 at Case Western Reserve in Cleveland, Ohio. She was thrilled to find the Cleveland Food Co-op near campus and her new apartment, which she shared with two other students. Over the course of several years, Judy had been changing aspects of her diet, primarily because of health-related concerns. Like others at the time, she wondered about the long-term effects of pesticides on produce, preservatives in meats, and chemicals used in processing of grains. By 1978 she was ready to give up red meat and fowl, a decision she announced to her family as they sat down to Thanksgiving dinner. Starting with that first meatless Thanksgiving, she adopted a diet of organically grown vegetables, grains, and dairy, with occasional servings of fish.

The Cleveland Food Co-op was established in 1968 as a volunteer-based, natural foods store. Judy joined the co-op and felt she had found a place that offered the foods she wanted to consume, things like locally grown, organic vegetables that were not available in regular stores or expensive “health food” stores. She enjoyed re-using this canvas bag, remarking that the “Save a Tree” motto appealed to her environmental sensibilities as well. Judy said, “I liked the whole idea of recycling—it was something in the late ‘70s that not everybody did.”

Bird Food Shipping Crate

National Museum of American History
This end panel of a Crescent Manufacturing Company bird food shipping crate is imprinted with the company’s crescent moon trademark. The company was founded in Seattle, Washington in 1883 as a supplier of vanilla extract to the Pacific Northwest. Later becoming Crescent Foods Inc., the company made its mark on the consumer landscape in 1905 with its Mapleine imitation maple flavoring. Mapleine is still sold today by McCormick, which bought Crescent in 1989.

Bird Food Shipping Crate

National Museum of American History
This end panel of a Crescent Manufacturing Company bird food shipping crate is imprinted with the company’s crescent moon trademark. The company was founded in Seattle, Washington in 1883 as a supplier of vanilla extract to the Pacific Northwest. Later becoming Crescent Foods Inc., the company made its mark on the consumer landscape in 1905 with its Mapleine imitation maple flavoring. Mapleine is still sold today by McCormick, which bought Crescent in 1989.

Food Product's Shipping Crate

National Museum of American History
This shipping crate end panel is imprinted with the “Libby’s” script of the manufacturing firm Libby, McNeil, and Libby. Archibald McNeil and Charles and Arthur Libby founded the company in 1868. Libby’s became one of the country's biggest producers of canned meats in vegetables in the early 20th century. The company was purchased by Nestle in 1971.

Baby Food

Smithsonian Magazine

coupon, food

National Museum of American History

coupon, food

National Museum of American History

coupon, food

National Museum of American History

coupon, food

National Museum of American History
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