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Found 4,672 Resources

flies, batch of

National Museum of American History

Ropalomerid Flies

Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute
Very little is known about ropalomerid flies and few species have been described. Only 29 species in the entire family according to Wikipedia. These individuals were filmed near Panama City, Panama. Collin Lab Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute Panama 2012

Diptera, true flies

Smithsonian Libraries

Tanypezidae (Tanypezid flies)

Smithsonian Libraries

Standard Trout Flies

National Museum of American History
Colored print of fish surrounded by sixty-four fishing flies keyed by number to a caption below the image that identifies them. This is an advertising print for Conroy & Bissett, manufacturers of fine fishing tackle in New York.

Superman Flies Again

National Museum of American History

Superman Flies Again

National Museum of American History

Superman Flies Again

National Museum of American History

Superman Flies Again

National Museum of American History

Look, It Flies!

Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden

An account of British flies (Diptera). By Fred. V. Theobald

Smithsonian Libraries
No more published?

Also available online.

Elecresource

Flower flies and Zoogeography

Smithsonian Libraries

The chrysotoxine syrphid-flies

Smithsonian Libraries

Note on cluster flies

Smithsonian Libraries

New Neotropical muscoid flies

Smithsonian Libraries

Lord of the Flies

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum

Month of the Flies

Smithsonian American Art Museum

Cage For Fire Flies

NMNH - Anthropology Dept.
FROM CARD: "ILLUS. IN BULL. 141, USNM, PL. 40, FIG. 7, P. 110."

The crane-flies of New York

Smithsonian Libraries
Part 2 originally published as thesis, Cornell University, 1918.

Copy 1, pt. 2 without thesis statement.

Also available online.

Elecresource

Adventures with Giant Bloodsucking Flies

National Museum of Natural History
Horse flies and deer flies are members of the largest family of bloodsucking insects—the Tabanidae, with more than 4,000 species described worldwide. Nearly all females feed on blood, which is needed for the development of eggs. That blood can transmit parasites to humans and livestock. All males and some females...

The Phorid Flies of Guam

Smithsonian Libraries

Notes en Nearctic bibionid flies

Smithsonian Libraries

Flies in relation to disease : non-bloodsucking flies / by G. S. Graham-Smith

Smithsonian Libraries
Also available online.

Elecresource
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