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film, movie

National Museum of American History

Film

National Museum of American History
Mounted gelatin silver print of Will Connell's "Film," one of a series of photographs taken for "In Pictures," Connell's satirical 1937 book about the Hollywood film industry. The photograph is a montage of looping motion picture film lit from beneath. Will Connell (1898-1961) was an influential photographer, teacher and author in Southern California known for his often-satirical “modern pictorialist” style, commercial photography work and mentorship of a generation of photographers. The National Museum of American History’s Photographic History collection received a donation of 11 prints of various subjects from Connell’s wife in 1963. This donation was followed by another, from Connell’s son, in 1977, comprised of the 49 prints published in In Pictures. Connell was born in McPherson, Kansas, but moved to California soon after. As a young man in Los Angeles, Connell came into contact with the thriving California camera clubs of the 1910s and 1920s, and more importantly, the burgeoning Hollywood film industry. After a brief stint in the U.S. Army Signal Corps at the end of the first World War, Connell worked a variety of odd jobs while experimenting in amateur photography. Several motion picture studios hired Connell to photograph actors and actresses in the 1920s and 1930s, and he soon became a professional. Connell’s glamour shots of stars such as Myrna Loy, as well as his growing body of art photography, reveal pictorialist influence, and his work was often exhibited at salons and exhibitions throughout the United States. In the 1930s, Connell began working as a photographer for magazines including the Saturday Evening Post, Colliers, Time and Vogue, started teaching photography at Art Center College and continued work at the Los Angeles studio he opened in 1925. Connell spent the rest of his life in Los Angeles, teaching, judging work, producing commercial work and writing, notably, his "Counsel by Connell" column in US Camera, which he authored for 15 years. His first book, In Pictures, was published in 1937. Now considered a classic work of satire, the book featured montaged, often surreal images that mocked the Hollywood studio system and a public enamored with the motion picture industry. The photographs were published alongside a fictional account of a meeting of Hollywood moguls, written by several of Connell’s friends in the business. While the images appear to be a marked departure from Connell’s earlier soft-focus pictorialism, the sharp, poignant photographs nevertheless retain that movement’s emphasis on composition and communication of a message. In Pictures also pays homage to the film industry where the photographer cut his teeth – many of the images feature close-ups, characteristic stage lighting and influence of the glamour of Hollywood’s Golden Age. Connell, in his work and teaching until his death in 1961, is cited as an influence on an entire generation of photographers, including Dr. Dain Tasker (COLL.PHOTOS.000031). His 1949 book About Photography outlined an artistic philosophy that stressed a straight-forward, communicative style of photography and expressed the author’s belief that even the most commercial work can have artistic merit. A 1963 monograph in US Camera featured fond remembrances from friends Ansel Adams and Dorothea Lange, among others, who praised Connell for his warm personality and unique work. Related Collections: Dain Tasker collection, Photographic History Collection, NMAH Will Connell collection, California Museum of Photography, University of California, Riverside, California Will Connell papers, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California Los Angeles County Museum of Art, Los Angeles, California Art Center School Archives, Pasadena, California

Motion Picture Film Pieces

National Museum of American History
A group of 13 pieces of motion picture film of varying widths and lengths housed together and therefore accessioned as a group. The objects are as follows:

1. 55mm b&w positive print showing buildings in a city; 7 frames, 6.5 inches long

2. 35mm b&w positive print showing a woman and flowers; 8.5 frames, 6.5 inches long

3. 35mm panchromatic color positive print showing a parade float; 3 frames, 2.5 inches long

4. 35mm color positive print showing a woman wearing a hat; 7 frames, 6 inches long

5. 35mm b&w positive print showing a woman singing by a man playing the piano - rectangular sprocket holes and uncommon variable-density soundtrack printed outside the frame, beside the holes; 3 frames, 2.5 inches long

6. 35mm b&w positive print showing the title of the S. Lubin production "A Policeman's Love Affair"; 6 frames, 4.5 inches long

7. 35mm b&w positive print showing a building or construction site on a street; 9 frames, 7.5 inches long

8. 35mm hand-tinted positive print by Pathe Freres showing a Middle Eastern scene, perhaps dating from ca 1904-5; 9 frames, 7 inches long

9. 28mm b&w positive print showing one man throwing another to the ground; 11 frames, 7 inches long

10. 35mm b&w positive print showing a scene in an Indian palace; 4 frames, 3 inches long

11. 50mm b&w positive print showing a bridge with a variable-density soundtrack; 8 frames, 6 inches long

12. 35mm yellow-tinted positive print showing the title information for the Vitagraph film "The Juggernaut"; 7 frames, 5.5 inches long

13. 35mm pink-tinted positive print showing an intertitle reading "Convalescent" from the Selig Polyscope film "The Spoilers"; 7.5 frames, 6 inches long

The Early Cinema Film and Ephemera Collection [COLL.PHOTOS.000038] includes over 50 pieces of notable motion picture film and more than 80 posters, photographs and other ephemeral objects from cinema’s early days. The collection’s film is primarily short lengths of motion picture film donated by inventors or industry groups to mark technological innovation. Charles Francis Jenkins, the co-inventor of the Vitascope projector, donated a short length of film showing William McKinley’s inauguration. Wallace Goold Levison and E. H. Amet, two early motion picture innovators, gave pieces of film, news clippings and business cards to mark their achievements in the technological development of the medium. The Society of Motion Picture Engineers, the leading trade association for motion picture workers, made two donations of early motion picture film samples, including examples of Biograph and early color motion pictures. Sound cinema pioneer Eugene Augustin Lauste’s scrapbooks and photographs illuminate his work to improve the motion picture as well as the early days of the industry. A portion of the film collection represents the work of pioneers like Charles Urban and August Plahn to perfect a natural and vibrant color for projected film.

The Collection also helps to illuminate the rise of the motion picture industry as a cultural and business phenomenon through ephemera. Posters promoting some of the earliest film exhibitions, the films of silent Western star William S. Hart, the 1930 re-release of D.W. Griffith’s Birth of a Nation and features presented at Washington’s Trans-Lux theater illustrate the range of movie advertising from the earliest days of the cinema to the industry’s attempts to combat television competition in the 1950s. A group of photographs of theaters, 270 glass slides used to promote upcoming features and pieces of movie star memorabilia broaden the collection’s focus to that of cinema culture at its zenith of influence in American life.

This finding aid is one in a series documenting the PHC’s Early Cinema Collection [COLL.PHOTOS.000018]. The cinema-related objects cover the range of technological innovation and popular appeal that defined the motion picture industry during a period in which it became the premier form of mass communication in American life, roughly 1885-1930. See also finding aids for Early Sound Cinema [COLL.PHOTOS.000040], Early Color Cinema [COLL.PHOTOS.000039], Early Cinema Equipment [COLL.PHOTOS.000037] and the Gatewood Dunston Collection [COLL.PHOTOS.000021].

dental film

National Museum of American History

magazine, film

National Museum of American History

film magazine

National Museum of American History

magazine, film

National Museum of American History

film reel

National Museum of American History

der Film [Film]

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
Poster for a film exhibition at the Zurich Museum of Arts and Crafts. On a black ground, in lower third of poster, the words in gray Akzidenz Grotesk typeface, "der" and in white Akzidenz Grotesk, "Film." The "F" overlaps the "er." The secondary texts in red, indicating the place, at top edge, lining up with the "F;" and the dates, hours, days at bottom edge, also lining up with the "F." This poster, like all of the designer's graphic design is constructed according to a grid system (see "notes" for more).

Film splicer

National Museum of the American Indian

film tank

National Museum of American History

Film still from Pinky

National Museum of African American History and Culture
A black and white film still from the film Pinky. The image depicts a scene of a police officer standing next to a woman who has hiked up her dress to reveal a small dagger. On the other side of the frame stands another man and a woman, both looking at the officer and first woman. All four stand in front of a fence, with trees visible in the background. Beneath the image is printed a licensing notice from National Screen Service Corp. on the left and a copyright notice [Copyright 1948 - 20th Century-Fox Film Corp.] along with [49/607]. At the bottom center is the cast and credit information: [Darryl F. Zanuck presents "PINKY" starring JEANNE CRAIN, / ETHEL BARRYMORE, ETHEL WATERS, WILLIAM LUNDIGAN / Produced by DARRYL F. ZANUCK, Directed by ELIA KAZAN / Printed in U.S.A.].

Film still for Carmen Jones

National Museum of African American History and Culture
A black and white movie still for the 1954 film Carmen Jones. The photo depicts a man and a woman. The man in the photo is kneeling on his right knee supporting the reclining woman on his left arm as she lies on the ground. The man is wearing a dark hat and jacket with dark shoes. The woman on the ground is wearing a light colored dress and stares blankly past the man above her. Behind them are torn boxes and stacked Coca-Cola bottles. In the bottom right hand corner of the photo it reads "CJ-70" in white text. Below the photo is information about who the photo belongs to, the starring cast, and copyright information.

Film aus Lateinamerika, Film Podium

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
Image of a black and white brick wall in background with a photograph of a man lightly superimposed on top. Text across top, in black, reads "Filmpodium." In foreground at left center, scribbles in red, orange and yellow with handwritten text in black, on top, which reads "Filme aus/ Lateinamerika." In bottom right, additional scribbles in red, orange and yellow with black text on top which reads "13 Okt - 15 Dez 1980" with additional date and time information following.

Strip of 35mm Film

National Museum of American History
Strip of 35mm negative film, part of a motion picture of a boat sailing on a body of water. The museum acquired this piece of film with the Vitascope #2 movie projector, an early model of the film projector that Thomas Edison's company manufactured in the early 20th century. Though the title of this particular subject is unknown, it is most likely from a short Edison film of a yacht race around 1900.

The Early Cinema Film and Ephemera Collection [COLL.PHOTOS.000038] includes over 50 pieces of notable motion picture film and more than 80 posters, photographs and other ephemeral objects from cinema’s early days. The collection’s film is primarily short lengths of motion picture film donated by inventors or industry groups to mark technological innovation. Charles Francis Jenkins, the co-inventor of the Vitascope projector, donated a short length of film showing William McKinley’s inauguration. Wallace Goold Levison and E. H. Amet, two early motion picture innovators, gave pieces of film, news clippings and business cards to mark their achievements in the technological development of the medium. The Society of Motion Picture Engineers, the leading trade association for motion picture workers, made two donations of early motion picture film samples, including examples of Biograph and early color motion pictures. Sound cinema pioneer Eugene Augustin Lauste’s scrapbooks and photographs illuminate his work to improve the motion picture as well as the early days of the industry. A portion of the film collection represents the work of pioneers like Charles Urban and August Plahn to perfect a natural and vibrant color for projected film.

The Collection also helps to illuminate the rise of the motion picture industry as a cultural and business phenomenon through ephemera. Posters promoting some of the earliest film exhibitions, the films of silent Western star William S. Hart, the 1930 re-release of D.W. Griffith’s Birth of a Nation and features presented at Washington’s Trans-Lux theater illustrate the range of movie advertising from the earliest days of the cinema to the industry’s attempts to combat television competition in the 1950s. A group of photographs of theaters, 270 glass slides used to promote upcoming features and pieces of movie star memorabilia broaden the collection’s focus to that of cinema culture at its zenith of influence in American life.

This finding aid is one in a series documenting the PHC’s Early Cinema Collection [COLL.PHOTOS.000018]. The cinema-related objects cover the range of technological innovation and popular appeal that defined the motion picture industry during a period in which it became the premier form of mass communication in American life, roughly 1885-1930. See also finding aids for Early Sound Cinema [COLL.PHOTOS.000040], Early Color Cinema [COLL.PHOTOS.000039], Early Cinema Equipment [COLL.PHOTOS.000037] and the Gatewood Dunston Collection [COLL.PHOTOS.000021].

Technicolor: Film Magazine

National Museum of American History

empty film spool

National Museum of American History

film magazine, electrocardiograph

National Museum of American History

film magazine , electrocardiograph

National Museum of American History

film magazine, electrocardiograph,

National Museum of American History

film magazine, electrocardiograph

National Museum of American History

Returu Film

National Museum of American History

Film Classic

National Museum of the American Indian

Russian Film

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
The Cuban flag in red, white and blue is repeated 8 times with the triangular parts meeting in the middle to form the lens of a camera. Title in black ink in Cyrillic at upper right.
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