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study of a male costumed figure

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
Horizontal rectangle. Full-length figure of a boy in costume, lying prone, facing right in profile. He is blowing a horn or flute.

pour Que la Liberte Continue d'Eclairer le Monde

Smithsonian American Art Museum

addo-x/tops in precision engineered adding machines and calculators

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
Poster divided into three registers: blue at top, white at center and black/red at bottom. At right, a black and white photograph of a woman, represented full length, wearing shorts and a top streches her arm across the blue section of the poster at top. She is balanced on her toes, with her knees bent and carrys a large ball behind her. At lower left the title is repeated three times, printed in white on a black square. The Ben-Day dots of the graphic process are prominently visible on the figure.

addo-x

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
Poster divided into three registers: blue at top, white at center and black and orange at bottom. At right, a black and white photograph of a woman (Anita Ekberg), represented full length, wearing shorts and a top streches her arm across the blue section of the poster at top. She is balanced on her toes, with her knees bent and carrys a large ball behind her. At lower left the title is repeated three times, printed in white on a black square: addo-x / addo-x / addo-x; in white on orange rectangle: tops in precision engineered adding machines and calculators. The Ben-Day dots of the graphic process are prominently visible on the figure.

[Young Girl]

Smithsonian American Art Museum

[Young Boy]

Smithsonian American Art Museum

[Worker with Hopper Car]

Smithsonian American Art Museum

[Baby in a Chair]

Smithsonian American Art Museum

[A Pennsylvania Trout Brook]

Smithsonian American Art Museum

Zwicker's House [painting] / (photographed by Peter A. Juley & Son)

Archives and Special Collections, Smithsonian American Art Museum
Title transcribed from negative.

New York Times, March 22, 1934, pg. 22.

Black-and-white study print (8x10).

Orig. negative: 8x10, Nitrate, BW.

copy 1 negative: 8x10, Safety, BW.

Zuyder-Zee [photomechanical print]

Archives and Special Collections, Smithsonian American Art Museum
(Printed on image, lower left): Copyright 1904 by F.A. Stokes, Co.

(Label on back, stamped and inscribed): Print Division / Library of Congress / Oct. 29, 1904 / No. 42282 / Two Copies Received Oct. 5, 1904 / Copyright Entry Oct. 5, 1904 / Class Y XXc. No. 23045 / Copy B.

Zuni Shalako Figure

Smithsonian American Art Museum
The paintings of Awa Tsireh (1898-1955), who was also known by his Spanish name, Alfonso Roybal, represent an encounter between the art traditions of native Pueblo peoples in the southwestern United States and the American modernist art style begun in New York in the early twentieth century. The son of distinguished potters, Awa Tsireh translated geometic pottery designs into stylized watercolors that feature the ceremonial dancers and practices of Pueblo communities. But Awa Tsireh's work is more than an amalgam of traditional and modernist design. At a time when the U.S. Office of Indian Affairs attempted to restrict Pueblo cultural and religious practices, the watercolors of Awa Tsireh and other Pueblo artists helped to affirm the importance of ceremonial dance and tirual to cultural survival.

Awa Tsireh's paintings quickly found an audience among the artists, writers, and archaeologists who descended on Santa Fe in great numbers in the late 1910s and 1920s. Painter John Sloan and poet Alice Corbin Henderson took a particular interest and arranged for his watercolors to be exhibited in New York, Chicago, and elsewhere. Henderson shared with the young Pueblo painter books on European and American modernism and Japanese woodblock prints, as well as South Asian miniatures and ancient Egyptian art that provided soure material for his stylized paintings. In this way, he redefined contemporary Pueblo art and created a new, pan-Pueblo style.

The paintings in this exhibition were donated to the Smithsonian American Art Museum in 1979 by the Hendersons' daughter, Alice H. Rossin.

Zomer-Dag [photomechanical print]

Archives and Special Collections, Smithsonian American Art Museum
(Printed on image, lower left): Copyright 1904 by F.A. Stokes, Co.

(Label on back, stamped and inscribed): Print Division / Library of Congress / Oct. 29, 1904 / No. 42282 / Two Copies Received Oct. 5, 1904 / Copyright Entry Oct. 5, 1904 / Class Y XXc. No. 23048 / Copy B.

Zilpha and the Clam Digger [painting] / (photographed by Peter A. Juley & Son)

Archives and Special Collections, Smithsonian American Art Museum
Negative marked: "Clam Diggers".

Black-and-white study print (8x10).

Orig. negative: 8x10, Nitrate, BW.

copy 1 negative: 8x10, Safety, BW.

Yurek's Last Visit

Smithsonian American Art Museum

Youth with Kite

Smithsonian American Art Museum

Youth and Dog [sculpture] / (photographer unknown)

Archives and Special Collections, Smithsonian American Art Museum
On photo mount label: C. E. Dallin. Youth and dog. Lincoln, Mass. 1924. Gift of Cyrus E. Dallin. Classification number: 282/D147/950. Accession: 76771.

1 photographic print : b&w, 8 7/8 x 7 1/2 in. (trimmed), mounted on 9 3/4 x 13 7/8 in. board.

Youth [sculpture] / (photographer unknown)

Archives and Special Collections, Smithsonian American Art Museum
On photo mount label: A. C. Ladd. Youth. Ownership unknown. 1932. bronze. Photographer: ?. Classification number: 282/L. Accession: 144661.

1 photographic print : b&w, 6 x 4 in. (trimmed), mounted on 9 3/4 x 13 7/8 in. board.

Youth Taming the Wild [sculpture] / (photographer unknown)

Archives and Special Collections, Smithsonian American Art Museum
On photo mount label: A. V. Hyatt. Youth taming the wild. Brookgreen, S.C., Brookgreen Gardens. stone. (there is a reduced replica in bronze.) Photographer? Gift of: Mr. Archer M. Huntington. Classification number: 282/H992/911. Accession: 160984.

1 photographic print : b&w, 9 1/4 x 7 1/2 in. (trimmed), mounted on 9 3/4 x 13 7/8 in. board.

Youth Taming the Wild [sculpture] / (photographed by Peter A. Juley & Son)

Archives and Special Collections, Smithsonian American Art Museum
Schaub-Koch, Emile, "Hindu Art and the Art of Anna Hyatt Huntington," Lisbon: International Institute of Arts and Letters, 1958, no. 24.

Black-and-white study print (8x10).

Orig. negative: 8x10, Nitrate, BW.

copy 1 negative: 8x10, Safety, BW.

Youth Conquering the Wild [sculpture] / (photographed by Peter A. Juley & Son)

Archives and Special Collections, Smithsonian American Art Museum
Evans, Cerinda W., "Anna Hyatt Huntington," Newport News, VA: The Mariners Museum, 1965, pg. 75.

Black-and-white study print (8x10).

Orig. negative: 8x10, Nitrate, BW.

copy 1 negative: 8x10, Safety, BW.

Your Forests--Your Fault--Your Loss

Smithsonian American Art Museum

Young Woman with Lilies [painting] / (photographed by Peter A. Juley & Son)

Archives and Special Collections, Smithsonian American Art Museum
Shannon's Fine Art Auctions, Sale 102600, (October 26, 2000), lot 21.

Black-and-white study print (8x10).

Orig. negative: 8x10, Safety, BW.
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