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Fashion

National Museum of American History

Fashion

National Museum of American History

Fashion

National Museum of American History

Fashion

National Museum of American History
A color print of a horse standing to the side. It is a liver bay held by a jockey standing in front of her. A race track rail is in the background.

Fashion was bred in 1837 by William Gibbons, Esq. of Madison, Morris County, NJ. Her sire was Trustee and her dam was Bonnets o’ Blue. Under the training of Samuel Laird, she won 32 of her 36 starts and gathered $41,500 in prize money. Her races were highly publicized. The North versus South Match Race against Boston in 1842 saw a crowd of 70,000 supporters. Despite Boston’s three mile lead, Fashion won with a time of 7:32 ½ for a four mile race. He next rival was the southern Peytona, who defeated Fashion in the first match but lost in the two rematches. Fashion raced until age 11 and then produced 10 foals in stud. She was sold to John Reber of Lancaster, Ohio in 1855. She died in 1860 and was eventually inducted into the Racing Hall of Fame in 1980. She was the namesake of a steamboat, several hotels, a brand of ladies’ gloves, and men’s cigars.

Fashion

National Museum of American History
A black and white print of a black race horse mounted by a jockey who wears jodphurs and a jacket with a wide lapel. A meadow surrounded by trees, fence, and a small country house.

Fashion was bred in 1837 by William Gibbons, Esq. of Madison, Morris County, NJ. Her sire was Trustee and her dam was Bonnets o’ Blue. Under the training of Samuel Laird, she won 32 of her 36 starts and gathered $41,500 in prize money. Her races were highly publicized. The North versus South Match Race against Boston in 1842 saw a crowd of 70,000 supporters. Despite Boston’s three mile lead, Fashion won with a time of 7:32 ½ for a four mile race. He next rival was the southern Peytona, who defeated Fashion in the first match but lost in the two rematches. Fashion raced until age 11 and then produced 10 foals in stud. She was sold to John Reber of Lancaster, Ohio in 1855. She died in 1860 and was eventually inducted into the Racing Hall of Fame in 1980. She was the namesake of a steamboat, several hotels, a brand of ladies’ gloves, and men’s cigars.

Archibald Dick lived 1805-1855. He was born in Scotland and studied engraving in Edinburgh before coming to America in the early 1830’s. He was a partner at the New York City firm of Barnard and Dick in 1831 before he joined Gimmer and Dick in 1833. He later left this firm to establish his own solo firm. Dick lived in Brooklyn til his death in 1855. His works were reproduced in contemporary magazines.

Fashion

National Museum of American History

fashion plate

National Museum of American History

fashion plate

National Museum of American History

fashion plate

National Museum of American History

Fashion Forward, Fashion Functional

SI Center for Learning and Digital Access
Teacher-created lesson in which students design clothing from non-recyclable materials that would otherwise go to waste.

fashion plate

National Museum of American History

fashion plate

National Museum of American History

fashion plate

National Museum of American History

fashion plate

National Museum of American History

fashion plate

National Museum of American History

fashion plate

National Museum of American History

fashion plate

National Museum of American History

fashion plate

National Museum of American History

fashion plate

National Museum of American History

fashion plate

National Museum of American History

fashion plate

National Museum of American History

fashion plate

National Museum of American History

fashion plate

National Museum of American History

fashion plate

National Museum of American History
1-24 of 11,424 Resources