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Distance Learning Activity: Liquid Labyrinth

Smithsonian Marine Station at Fort Pierce
Education Intern Meghan Carpenter gives you an overview of watersheds and storm-water runoff, then shows you how to create your own watershed using materials from home! This activity is part of the "Liquid Labyrinth" at-home activity, which includes more information and a worksheet. All distance learning materials, including this one, can be found on our distance learning page: https://naturalhistory.si.edu/research/smithsonian-marine-station/smithsonian-exhibit-st-lucie-county-aquarium/st-lucie-county

Dichotomous Key Activity - Distance Learning Module

Smithsonian Marine Station at Fort Pierce
This is a distance learning module created by the Education Team at the Smithsonian Marine Ecosystems Exhibit at the St. Lucie County Aquarium. To access this module's lesson activity worksheet and answer key, please visit http://StLucieCo.gov/Aquarium.

Exploring Mangrove Ecosystems - Distance Learning Module

Smithsonian Marine Station at Fort Pierce
This is a distance learning module created by the Education Team at the Smithsonian Marine Ecosystems Exhibit at the St. Lucie County Aquarium. To access this module's lesson activity worksheet and answer key, please visit https://naturalhistory.si.edu/research/smithsonian-marine-station/smithsonian-exhibit-st-lucie-county-aquarium/st-lucie-county

Distance Learning Activity: Invent an Invertebrate

Smithsonian Marine Station at Fort Pierce
Education Intern Meghan Carpenter gives you an overview of invertebrates, which make up 95% of all life on Earth, then shows you how to create your own invertebrate using materials from home! This activity is part of the "Invent an Invertebrate" at-home activity, which includes more information and a worksheet. All distance learning materials, including this one, can be found on our distance learning page: https://naturalhistory.si.edu/research/smithsonian-marine-station/smithsonian-exhibit-st-lucie-county-aquarium/st-lucie-county

Distance Learning Activity: Great Plankton Sink Off

Smithsonian Marine Station at Fort Pierce
Education Intern Meghan Carpenter gives you an overview of the world of plankton, then shows you how to create your own plankton using materials from home! This activity is part of the "Great Plankton Sink Off" at-home activity, which includes more information and a worksheet. All distance learning materials, including this one, can be found on our distance learning page: https://naturalhistory.si.edu/research/smithsonian-marine-station/smithsonian-exhibit-st-lucie-county-aquarium/st-lucie-county

Plankton Matching Activity - Distance Learning Module

Smithsonian Marine Station at Fort Pierce
This is a distance learning module created by the Education Team at the Smithsonian Marine Ecosystems Exhibit at the St. Lucie County Aquarium. To access this module's lesson activity worksheet and answer key, please visit http://StLucieCo.gov/Aquarium or https://naturalhistory.si.edu/research/smithsonian-marine-station/smithsonian-exhibit-st-lucie-county-aquarium/st-lucie-county

Exploring Oyster Reefs - Distance Learning Module

Smithsonian Marine Station at Fort Pierce
This is a distance learning module created by the Education Team at the Smithsonian Marine Ecosystems Exhibit at the St. Lucie County Aquarium. To access this module's lesson activity worksheet and answer key, please visit https://naturalhistory.si.edu/research/smithsonian-marine-station/smithsonian-exhibit-st-lucie-county-aquarium/st-lucie-county

Exploring Seagrass Ecosystems - Distance Learning Module

Smithsonian Marine Station at Fort Pierce
This is a distance learning module created by the Education Team at the Smithsonian Marine Ecosystems Exhibit at the St. Lucie County Aquarium. To access this module's lesson activity worksheet and answer key, please visit: https://naturalhistory.si.edu/research/smithsonian-marine-station/smithsonian-exhibit-st-lucie-county-aquarium/st-lucie-county or http://StLucieCo.gov/Aquarium

Smithsonian Environmental Research Center Distance Learning Programs

SI Center for Learning and Digital Access
Gateway to information on SERC's electronic field trips and videoconferences. Provides an opportunity to talk with scientists and educators and possibly venture into places where on-site visitors are seldom permitted.

Air and Space Live Chat: Parent and Teacher Resources

National Air and Space Museum
This chat featured Ashley Naranjo from Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access, and Marty Kelsey, former teacher and one of the hosts of the Emmy nominated TV show for middle school students produced by the National Air and Space Museum. Learn about digital learning opportunities from all of the Smithsonian Museums. This was recorded live on March 23, 2020 Links to resources mentioned in the webcast: Learning Lab: https://learninglab.si.edu/ Smithsonian Distance Learning: https://learninglab.si.edu/distancelearning NMAAHC Solar Power at the museum: https://learninglab.si.edu/collections/exploring-solar-power-at-nmaahc/ehiDiboWEpmWK8hm National Air and Space Museum Portal: https://airandspace.si.edu/learn STEM in 30 Smithsonian Science Starters: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL6RlkQnoCx_VahztuZ2xuwn9TO3JKfs1s My Path: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL6RlkQnoCx_VvN6SkGaFShkAyOcNX8Rry Middle School Minute: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL6RlkQnoCx_XCUkvSVK6UbP1dj55dcfeE Full Shows: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL6RlkQnoCx_UeWQpT5dDXUssF94xYSPkH Videos with Adam Savage: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL6RlkQnoCx_XbF0kwmaGok9071Z7pIsqY Additional Content: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL6RlkQnoCx_UeWQpT5dDXUssF94xYSPkH How Things Fly: https://howthingsfly.si.edu/media?type=media_try_at_home_activities Earth Optimism: https://earthoptimism.si.edu/resources/comic/ Smithsonian Channel: https://www.facebook.com/SmithsonianChannel/photos/pb.74671163356.-2207520000../10158977908378357/?type=3&theater EZ Science: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL6RlkQnoCx_VEQxZjoI9IhBHPWnEBjhig Smithsonian page:https://www.si.edu/ Smithsonian Science How: https://naturalhistory.si.edu/education/distance-learning/smithsonian-science-how-webcast-archives Re:Frame from Smithsonian American Art Museum: https://americanart.si.edu/videos/reframe-videos MicroObservatory Robotic Telescope Network: https://mo-www.cfa.harvard.edu/MicroObservatory/ Spanish Resources: https://learninglab.si.edu/collections/descubra-meet-the-science-expert/WfYsJvHH8HKY2aLy#r National Zoo Webcams: https://nationalzoo.si.edu/webcams Smithsonian Science Education Game Center: https://ssec.si.edu/game-center Natural History Distance Learning Portal: https://naturalhistory.si.edu/education/distance-learning Invent It Challenge: https://inventitchallenge2020.epals.com/ Smithsonian Transcription Center: https://transcription.si.edu/ For more FREE teacher resources from the Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum visit STEM in 30, the museum's Emmy nominated TV show for middle school students: https://airandspace.si.edu/stem-30

AstrOlympics, Winter: Distance (Short Promo Version)

Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory
What do Olympic athletes and objects in space have in common? The answer is matter in motion, often in extreme examples. Whether it is a human body moving at the fastest speeds possible or the debris from an exploded star blasting through space, the physics of that motion is, in many ways, the same. The AstrOlympics project explores the spectacular range of science that we can find both in the impressive feats of the Olympic Games as well as cosmic phenomena throughout the Universe. By measuring the range of values for such things as speed, mass, time, pressure, rotation, distance, and more, we can learn not only about the world around us, but also about the Universe we all live in. Visit: http://chandra.si.edu/olympics/winter/

Developing Historical Thinkers with American Art

Smithsonian Education
Session Description: Building on the familiar jigsaw method (http://bit.ly/1YliETv), teachers will apply knowledge gleaned from a pre-reading to an artwork. They will learn an easy-to-deploy strategy for looking deeply at an artwork, discovering how an artwork can be used not as an illustration but rather a text rich with historical, cultural, and geographical influence. Complementary Learning Lab collection with the strategies and artworks mentioned available here: https://learninglab.si.edu/collections/developing-historical-thinkers-with-american-art/CLNbAtqKoRy1WFCg Presenters from the Smithsonian American Art Museum: -Elizabeth Dale-Deines, Teacher Programs Coordinator -Peg Koetsch, Distance Learning Coordinator This is the first of three online sessions in spring 2016 created to support Smithsonian Learning Lab workshops for middle school teachers in Allegheny County, Pennsylvania, funded by the Grable Foundation and in partnership with Allegheny Intermediate Unit and the Senator John Heinz History Center.

Robert Ballard — Ocean Explorer

Smithsonian Magazine

Best known for his discoveries of the sunken RMS Titanic and the battleship Bismarck, Robert Ballard has redefined our scientific knowledge of the oceans, conducting more than 120 deep-sea expeditions. While harnessing new technologies to explore the ocean floor, Ballard has also pioneered distance learning in classrooms around the world with JASON Learning, an award-winning educational program that reaches over a million students annually.

Robert Ballard was a featured speaker at Smithsonian magazine’s “The Future is Here” conference on June 1. See a video of his talk below:

Watch this video in the original article

Meet Smithsonian MarineGEO Scientist Maggie Johnson

National Museum of Natural History
Meet Maggie Johnson, a MarineGEO postdoctoral fellow with the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute and the Smithsonian Marine Station at Fort Pierce, Florida. With MarineGEO, Maggie uses standardized monitoring procedures, including permanent benthic surveys and Calcification Accretion Units (CAUs), to quantify how coral and oyster reef structure and function changes over space and time. She has implemented this approach at three MarineGEO sites (Bocas del Toro, Panama; Carrie Bow Cay, Belize; Indian River Lagoon, Florida) and in Coiba on the Pacific coast of Panama. Learn more about Maggie and meet her online during the Oct 8, 2019 Smithsonian Science How webcast: https://naturalhistory.si.edu/education/distance-learning/tracking-health-coral-reefs-live-belize Photo: Scott Ling, University of Tasmania

Meet Smithsonian MarineGEO Scientist Alex Lowe

National Museum of Natural History
Alex Lowe is a MarineGEO post-doctoral fellow with the Smithsonian. Alex knew he wanted to become a marine scientist when he went scuba diving for the first time in his home state of Utah. Alex’s research is focused on water chemistry. He uses a special tool called a data logger - like a FitBit for the ocean - to record different measures of water chemistry in coastal-marine habitats, like coral reefs. This can help him understand what conditions the animals in coastal habitats experience - and if they are stressful or not. To learn more about Smithsonian scientists and connect with them through Smithsonian Science How, visit: https://naturalhistory.si.edu/education/distance-learning

Meet MarineGEO Technician, Leah Harper

National Museum of Natural History
Leah wanted to be a marine biologist as long as she can remember. As a kid, she wanted to study orcas, but her interests shifted to studying coral reefs after scuba diving for the first time on a Caribbean coral reef. Now, Leah is the central technician for the Smithsonian's MarineGEO program, which means she travels to different locations around the world, surveying and studying the diversity of life in different nearshore habitats, including coral reefs. Learn more about Leah and meet her online during the Oct. 8, 2019 Smithsonian Science How webcast: https://naturalhistory.si.edu/education/distance-learning/tracking-health-coral-reefs-live-belize

Meet Smithsonian Lichenologist Manuela Dal Forno

National Museum of Natural History
Dr. Manuela Dal Forno is a research scientist with the Smithsonian’s National Museum of Natural History. Ever since she was a young child, she would investigate the stuff growing on trees in her native Brazil. She now has dedicated her career to studying this "stuff": lichens. As a lichenologist, a scientist who studies lichens, Manuela’s research is focused on understanding the diversity of lichens. By examining lichens that she discovers in the field and ones housed in the U.S. National Herbarium, Manuela is discovering new species and unraveling the complex relationships among lichens' symbionts: fungus, algae, and other microorganisms. Watch a live webcast, "What's a Lichen?", Nov. 14, 2019, featuring Manuela. She'll discuss her work and answer viewer questions. https://naturalhistory.si.edu/education/distance-learning/what-is-lichen-symbiosis

Editor at Large: Going the Distance

Smithsonian Magazine

Editor at Large

Smithsonian magazine editor's job involves working mostly behind the scenes. We think of ourselves as deskbound, though the truth is, our combined travel experiences would fill months of magazine pages. So from time to time one of us will share a journey or two. This month we present the down under travel experiences of longtime editor Edwards Park, originator of the magazine's "Around the Mall and Beyond" column. Ted got up from his desk a number of times over the years to go to "Oz," a land that became his second home.

Going the Distance
by Edwards Park

For some arcane reason, Americans need a visa to visit Australia. Until computers took over, we had to apply for it, and those who lived near Washington, D.C. often went straight to the Australian Embassy. My passport still has one obtained there in 1994. I remember answering the standard questions, including: "Have you visited Australia before?"
"Yes," I said.
"When was your last visit?"
"Two years ago."
"Was that your first time?"
"No, that would be 1942, during the war. Then 1946."
The official looked up from the application form. "Any other visits?"
"Yes," I said. "Between 20 and 30."
And then I had to explain that my wife is an Australian, that we lived in Melbourne for five years, and have since returned whenever we could. Australia is my country-in-law, and obviously, I'm very fond of it.

Getting there used to be half the fun. In the late 1930s it called for a seagoing vacation on a comfortable Matson liner, or a mostly luxurious aerial journey by flying boat from Britain. Our first tickets for transpacific flights in pre-jet days included a 30-hour layover in a good Honolulu hotel, a couple of hours at tiny, equatorial Canton Island and an afternoon and evening at Nandi, in the Fiji Islands. Time in the air was spent chatting with fellow adventurers—there weren't many of them—eating splendid food and nodding off to the lulling beat of four mighty engines.

Some of these propeller-driven planes were sleepers, the seats compartmented and made into berths by the steward. But who could resist stepping out in the wee hours at Canton for a cup of U.S. Navy coffee and a look at the atoll's one tree? The whole flight took about four days, and left indelible and pleasant memories.

Today, Australia's famous government-sponsored airline, Qantas, makes the trip nonstop from Los Angeles to Sydney in less than 15 hours! You board a jumbo jet, modified to take fewer passengers and more fuel, and settle down for an arduous—but shortened—sentence in an aluminum jail. Many Australia-bound passengers prefer to stop over in Hawaii for a touch of paradise before facing the nine-hour leg to Sydney.

Qantas (the name is an acronym for Queensland and Northern Territory Aerial Service) is still the dominating Pacific airline, though some American lines take on the Australia run at various times. Also, Air New Zealand does it, usually laying over at Tahiti before going on to Auckland, then across the Tasman Sea to the faint white line of surf that marks the 4,000-mile east coast of "Oz." It's a longer, more costly flight, but a good one. Ask a New Zealand air hostess for a martini, and she's likely to pass over the necessary bottles. "I'm no good at that," she'll say, charmingly. "Help yourself."

Cost for any ticket fluctuates with the seasons. You may pay surprisingly little. But face it: the physical demands of sitting, cramped, hour after hour, are a special torture alleviated only by struggling out of your seat and trying to walk up and down the aisles, past food and drink carts, perhaps to join the line waiting to get in to the loo.

If you have Australian hosts awaiting you, remember that their "sin taxes" on liquor and cigarettes are much higher than in the States. So perhaps you may risk trying an American duty-free shop for your present. But real duty-free bargains are elusive, and stories are told of famous-name Scotch whiskey that turned out to be mostly water. Sydney's duty-free shops, many of them along Pitt Street, seem more trustworthy, and are always worth a look.

The demands of arrival in Sydney may prove almost too hard to bear after your long flight. The airport is just as overcrowded and under-efficient as those in the States. If you've scheduled an immediate domestic flight to another city, you probably can't make it. But the airport's porters can help greatly—for a few American bills. Aussies avoid tipping unless for extra service. Help at the airport often qualifies.

Generally, if you plan to go anywhere else in this enormous country, you should stop over in Sydney for a night or two after your arrival. You need the rest, and this is a glorious place to get it. Many of the big hotels are outrageously expensive, but others, more reasonable, can be found. And at the time of writing, at least, the exchange rate is highly favorable to us Yanks.

Australian money is simple, attractive and easy to learn—coins for one and two dollars, bills for five, ten, twenty, fifty and a hundred dollars, growing in size as their value goes up—a convenience when paying for a taxi at night.

As the regretful time to leave Oz approaches, check to see if you'll need a departure fee and keep it handy. And have a good look at your last Australian sunset. The whole trip's worth it.

 

Meet Smithsonian Ornithologist Sahas Barve

National Museum of Natural History
As a kid growing up in Mumbai, India, Sahas Barve loved being outside and observing the natural world around him, especially birds. Now, as an adult and self-acclaimed bird-nerd, Sahas has observed thousands of birds around the world and calls a field-site in the Himalayas home-base for several months each year to study the birds that live there. To study how birds stay warm in different Himalayan habitats, Sahas studies birds in the wild when he is at his field site, by observing them in nature, recording their calls, studying their feathers, and taking tiny blood samples that can reveal a lot about the animal. Back at the Smithsonian’s National Museum of Natural History, Sahas uses a collection of birds that has been created over the last 150 years to look at and compare birds’ feathers, searching for patterns that might help him better understand the structure of feathers in birds across these diverse habitats. Connect with Sahas to learn more about his work and answer him questions during the Smithsonian Science How webcast, "How Do Birds Stay Warm?" on February 6, 2020. Learn more and sign up: https://naturalhistory.si.edu/education/distance-learning/how-birds-stay-warm-ornithologist-sahas-barve

Framing a Masterpiece

Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery
Exhibition specialist John Piper walks us through creating a Whistler designed frame. https://asia.si.edu/exhibition/framing-a-masterpiece/ John Piper is an exhibit specialist at Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery, Smithsonian's National Museum of Asian Art. ----- Smithsonian Cares is a place where people can learn some of the ways the Smithsonian is supporting and helping our country in a time of great need. While our buildings may be closed temporarily, the Smithsonian is here for you from home with vast digital resources. Education teams are providing distance learning resources to support and stay connected with the communities we serve, including caregivers, students, and teachers. Smithsonian scientists, curators, and historians are sharing their expertise through video and live streaming. New online content is being added daily by web and social media teams. We hope that you will feel connected to the power of art, history, and culture, inspired by the quest to understand the natural world around us, and emboldened by the Smithsonian as we document and explore. https://www.si.edu/cares -----

Meet the Scientist: Paleontologist Advait Jukar

National Museum of Natural History
As a kid, Advait Jukar loved the extinct monsters of deep time, like dinosaurs and mammoths, which is why he feels so lucky now, getting to study these fossil giants every day as a paleontologist at the National Museum of Natural History. Advait specializes in the study of fossil elephants and their extinct relatives, like mastodons, mammoths, and gomphotheres. The earliest elephant relatives originated in Africa about 60 million years ago and dispersed to every continent on earth, except Antarctica and Australia. There are about 165 known elephant species from the fossil record, and scientists estimate that there would have been many more that we haven't found yet, over the whole history of this special group, called a clade. In Earth’s more recent history, between 50,000 and 40,000 years ago, there were 16 species of elephants and their relatives living at the same time around the world, including at least 7 in the United States. Today, there are only three species of elephants that remain: the African savannah elephant (Loxodonta africana), the African forest elephant (Loxodonta cyclotis), and the Asian elephant (Elephas maximus). Populations of all three species are declining, with Asian elephants at a much higher risk of extinction. Understanding extinct elephants can reveal what environments looked like in the past and how communities of plants and animals were connected. To study this group, Advait uses the Smithsonian’s collection of fossil elephant skulls and teeth to try to figure out how many different kinds of elephants there were in Earth’s history, what food they may have eaten, and how they were related to each other. Taking measurements of skulls and teeth help Advait make comparisons to other fossils and find patterns to reveal new information. Watch the brief video above to learn how he uses collections to study fossil elephants. This video is part of the Smithsonian Science How series. For more information, visit: https://naturalhistory.si.edu/education/distance-learning/forgotten-elephants-deep-time

Fern Life Cycle and Biodiversity ft. Smithsonian Scientist Eric Schuettpelz

National Museum of Natural History
Meet Dr. Eric Schuettpelz, a botanist who studies ferns and fern biodiversity at the Smithsonian's National Museum of Natural History. During this webcast, which originally aired on April 19, 2018, Eric helps students understand the fern life cycle. Using models and a microscope, Eric shows students fern spores and the different life stages of ferns. Eric helps viewers understand what features have allowed ferns to persist on Earth for millions of years, while adapting to new conditions. Eric also provides a glimpse of what it's like to be a field biologist, sharing stories and photos of the field work he's conducted in the remote Marquesas Islands, to explore the profusion of ferns on islands. This program is part of the Smithsonian Science How webcast series, whcih is designed to bring natural history science, research, and experts to upper-elementary and middle-school students. Learn more here: https://naturalhistory.si.edu/education/distance-learning. NGSS Alignment Life Science MS-LS1 From Molecules to Organisms: Structures and Processes MS-LS1-4: Use argument based on empirical evidence and scientific reasoning to support an explanation for how characteristic animal behaviors and specialized plant structures affect the probability of successful reproduction of animals and plants respectively. MS-LS2 Ecosystems: Interactions, Energy, and Dynamics MS-LS2-2: Construct an explanation that predicts patterns of interactions among organisms across multiple ecosystems. MS-LS4 Biological Evolution: Unity and Diversity MS-LS4-4: Construct an explanation based on evidence that describes how genetic variations of traits in a population increase some individuals' probability of surviving and reproducing in a specific environment.

Exploring the Amazing World of Lichens with Manuela Dal Forno

National Museum of Natural History
Lichens are all around us — on trees, rocks, and even some buildings. But, what is a lichen? And what good are they? Lichen scientist Manuela Dal Forno will help students understand the special symbiotic relationship inside each lichen. She will show students the different steps she takes to study lichens: finding them in nature, looking at them under a microscope, and analyzing their DNA. She will share why we care about lichens: Understanding the life around us is important for understanding nature and how environments are changing. For instance, many lichens are indicators of air quality and others provide habitats for insects and nest material for hummingbirds. This program originally aired March 28, 2019, as part of the Smithsonian Science How webcast series, which is designed to bring natural history research and scientists to upper-elementary and middle-school students. Learn more about the Science How program and sign up for a live broadcast on the Smithsonian's National Museum of Natural History's website: https://naturalhistory.si.edu/education/distance-learning.

Viral Histories: Stories of Racism, Resilience, and Resistance in Asian American Communities

Smithsonian Education
How do we strengthen a community in the middle of an emergency? What drives us to build community strength and resiliency during an emergency? During this pandemic, Asian Americans have been experiencing increased racism and hate crimes. While these incidents of increased prejudice and violence occur today, they reflect a long history of how power, prejudice, and public health have intersected throughout American history. During Asian Pacific American History Month, join us for (digital) conversations with community leaders combating racism while serving on the front lines. Community leaders will share their first-hand experience with historians from the Smithsonian’s National Museum of American History, who will connect these experiences to the past. During the week of May 18 a new interview video will be released Monday through Thursday at 9:00 am EDT, followed by an opportunity for a live Q&A with some of the featured speakers every day at 3:00 pm EDT. Note: The videos will be appropriate for high school students as well as curious adults. Resources will be available for teachers to make this part of their distance learning plans. https://americanhistory.si.edu/events/viral-histories-stories-racism-resilience-and-resistance-asian-american-communities http://learninglab.si.edu/q/ll-c/ng8xNRzWAEaKWm9M
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