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Island Chumash Sound Recording

National Anthropological Archives
Digitization and preparation of these materials for online access has been funded through generous support from the Arcadia Fund.

Shellac disc

Continuation of the Santa Cruz into English. Woman interviewing man about learning from Candelaria.

Chumash Sound Recording 23 JUL 1936

National Anthropological Archives
Digital audio file produced from 1/4" open reel tape copy.

SC WN

Disc Note:Aeh List

SEE CHU CT10, 16 MINS:CHU CT11, 17 MINS, 7.50IPS, NARS

Aluminum disc

Chumash Sound Recording 23 JUL 1936

National Anthropological Archives
Digital audio file produced from 1/4" open reel tape copy.

FM CL

Disc Note:Aeh List

SEE CHU 0082, 0084-0087

Aluminum disc

Chumash Ventureño Sound Recording n.d

National Anthropological Archives
Digital audio file produced from 1/4" open reel tape copy.

Disc Note:JPH Note

Aluminum disc

Chumash Sound Recording 23 JUL 1936

National Anthropological Archives
Digital audio file produced from 1/4" open reel tape copy.

FM SC CL

Disc Note:Aeh List

SEE CHU 0082, 0083, 0085-0087

Aluminum disc

Chumash Sound Recording 23 JUL 1936

National Anthropological Archives
Digital audio file produced from 1/4" open reel tape copy.

FM CL

Disc Note:Aeh List

SEE CHU 0082-0084, 0086, 0087

Aluminum disc

Chumash Sound Recording 21 JUN 1936

National Anthropological Archives
Digital audio file produced from 1/4" open reel tape copy.

DT SC CL

Disc Note:Aeh List

SEE CHU CT1A, 21 MINS, 7.50IPS, NARS

Aluminum disc

Ventureño and Island Chumash Sound Recording

National Anthropological Archives
Digitization and preparation of these materials for online access has been funded through generous support from the Arcadia Fund.

Shellac disc

Side 1: Man translating Ventureño into English; Side 2: Vocabulary with Santa Cruz dialect to English, given to man by Mr. Callenburg/Cowdenburg in employ of the Smithsonian Institute, to compare with Ventureño (audio speeds up throughout side)

Chumash Sound Recording 23 JUL 1936

National Anthropological Archives
Digital audio file produced from 1/4" open reel tape copy.

FM CL

Disc Note:Aeh List

SEE CHU 0082-0085,0087

Aluminum disc

Chumash Sound Recording 23 JUL 1936

National Anthropological Archives
Digital audio file produced from 1/4" open reel tape copy.

FM CL

Disc Note:Aeh List

SEE CHU 0083-0087

Aluminum disc

Chumash Sound Recording 23 JUL 1936

National Anthropological Archives
Digital audio file produced from 1/4" open reel tape copy.

SC WN

Disc Note:Aeh List

SEE CHU CT9 CHU CT7, 21 MINS:CHU CT8, 21 MINS:CHU CT9, 3 MINS, 7.50 IPS, NARS CHU CT9, 3 MINS, 7.50IPS, NARS

Aluminum disc

Chumash Sound Recording 23 JUL 1936

National Anthropological Archives
Digital audio file produced from 1/4" open reel tape copy.

SC

Disc Note:Aeh List

SEE CHU CT3, 21 MINS:CHU CT4, 21 MINS, 7.50IPS, NARS

Aluminum disc

Chumash Sound Recording 21 JUN 1936

National Anthropological Archives
Digital audio file produced from 1/4" open reel tape copy.

SC

Disc Note:Aeh List

SEE CHU CTIB, 25 MINS, 7.50IPS, NARS

Aluminum disc

Chumash Sound Recording 23 JUL 1936

National Anthropological Archives
Digital audio file produced from 1/4" open reel tape copy.

FM SC CL

Disc Note:Aeh List

SEE CHU 080 CHU CT5, 21 MINS:CHU CT6, 19 MINS, 7.50 IPS, NARS

Aluminum disc

Chumash Sound Recording 21 JUN 1936

National Anthropological Archives
Digital audio file produced from 1/4" open reel tape copy.

Disc Note:Aeh List Sketch of the Grammar of the Luiseno (Fi-Antoe) Language of California; Sparkman, P S; Amer Anthro, Vol 7, 1905; P656-662

SEE CHU CT2A, 29 MINS, COPY 1:CHU CT2B, 30 MINS, COPY 2, 7.50IPS, NARS

Aluminum disc

Obispeno Chumash vocabulary

National Anthropological Archives
From Alikano, a full-blood Indian living on Mr. Jasper's ranch near San Luis Obispo. October 19-28, 1884; and 1888.

Handwritten in ink. The 1884 portion is apparently a neat copy from the Obispeno portion of Number 296, with the addition of a note identifying the informant. To this has been added in a different shade of ink material obtained from the same informant in 1888.

John Peabody Harrington papers: Chumash (part 3), 1912-1961

National Anthropological Archives
Microfilm and digital surrogates of microfilm are available. See Volume 3, reels 1-96. Only original documents created by Harrington, his collaborators and field assistants, or notes given to him were microfilmed.

John P. Harrington studied the Chumash Indians of southern California more thoroughly than any other group, both linguistically and culturally. He first expressed interest in the Chumash culture as early as 1902 during summer school studies with A. L. Kroeber and P. E. Goddard. His linguistic study of the Chumash family began during his association with the School of American Archaeology and the Panama-California Exposition and continued periodically up until his death in 1961.

Electronic inventory available. Consult with archivist. For a comprehensive description of these materials, see "The papers of John Peabody Harrington in the Smithsonian Institution, 1907-1957, Volume 3, A guide to the field notes: Native American history, language, and culture of Southern California/Basin," edited by Elaine L. Mills and Ann J. Brickfield (1986). http://anthropology.si.edu/naa/harrington/pdf/mf_guides/jp%20harrington%20guide%20-%20volume%203.pdf

This subseries was broken up into six catalog records to facilitate viewing of digital surrogates. See the other catalog records for John Peabody Harrington papers: Chumash to view surrogates for the rest of Harrington's Costanoan files.

This subseries of the Southern California/Basin series contains John P. Harrington's research on Chumash. His voluminous records on the group--totaling several hundred thousand pages--contain data on each of the six distinct dialect groups which constitute Chumash.

Material on the Obispeno, classified as Northern Chumash, consists primarily of vocabulary and contains a mixture of linguistic, ethnographic, and personal data. These elicitations from the last known native speaker, Rosario Cooper, represent the fullest and phonetically most reliable attestation of the language.

The Purisimeno notes consist mainly of words and "corrected vocabularies." Unlike the materials for the other Central Chumash dialects--Ineseno, Barbareno, and Ventureno--these records contain little grammatical information. Occasional Purisimeno forms are to be found in the Obispeno notes. In addition, much of the Purisimeno data is intermixed with that for Ineseno, as Harrington's informants were generally speakers of both.

Records relating to Ineseno are extensive and varied. They include raw field notes, texts, semantic and grammatical slipfiles, and a dictionary. The bulk of the data are from Maria Solares.

The Barbareno dialect of Central Chumash provided a constant source of interest for Harrington. He became fluent enough that he omitted glosses and translations from his later notes and was able to exchange letters with native speakers. During the course of his fieldwork, he had the unique opportunity to work with three generations of women in one family: Luisa Ignacio (around 1914); her daughter, Lucrecia Garcia (1926-1928); and her granddaughter, Mary Yee (from the 1920s to the early 1960s). Harrington also worked with Juan de Jesus Justo, a speaker of a different subdialect. While the notes Harrington recorded on Barbareno are among his most extensive, they are not as clearly organized as those for other groups. Thousands of pages of linguistic notes are totally without organization. Harrington rarely obtained paradigms. Instead, he obtained information by rechecking other sources, such as his own Ineseno dictionary, or by eliciting sentences in a random fashion. While textual material is plentiful, complete interlinear and free translations are often lacking.

Harrington's ethnographic notes on the Ventureno are among the most complete for any California Indian tribe he studied. Detailed accounts of Chumash life were obtained from the elderly Fernando Librado. Their interviews touched upon religion, perceptions of astronomy, such technologies as boat building and basket making, social structure, medical practices, and natural resources. A number of subdialects are represented in the Ventureno notes. Harrington recorded the "commonized" Ventura Mission dialect (samala) from Librado, Simplicio Pico, and Cecilio Tumamait. Interior Chumash (Cayetano and Castequeno) was obtained from Jose Juan Olivas. Other dialects mentioned include Mugu, Malibu, Ojai, and Matilija. There are also notes on the lone woman of San Nicolas Island.

In comparison with the records for the other Chumash dialects, documentation for Island Chumash (Ysleno) is extremely limited. Scattered throughout the material are references to the two dialects of Santa Cruz (Cruzeno), swaxil and kaxas. The speech of Santa Rosa and San Miguel is also mentioned.

The subseries also contains drafts of different lengths and in various stages of completion. Two documents pertain to Barbareno linguistics while the remaining papers reflect Harrington's cultural study of the Chumash.

John Peabody Harrington papers: Chumash (part 5), 1912-1961

National Anthropological Archives
Microfilm and digital surrogates of microfilm are available. See Volume 3, reels 1-96. Only original documents created by Harrington, his collaborators and field assistants, or notes given to him were microfilmed.

John P. Harrington studied the Chumash Indians of southern California more thoroughly than any other group, both linguistically and culturally. He first expressed interest in the Chumash culture as early as 1902 during summer school studies with A. L. Kroeber and P. E. Goddard. His linguistic study of the Chumash family began during his association with the School of American Archaeology and the Panama-California Exposition and continued periodically up until his death in 1961.

Electronic inventory available. Consult with archivist. For a comprehensive description of these materials, see "The papers of John Peabody Harrington in the Smithsonian Institution, 1907-1957, Volume 3, A guide to the field notes: Native American history, language, and culture of Southern California/Basin," edited by Elaine L. Mills and Ann J. Brickfield (1986). http://anthropology.si.edu/naa/harrington/pdf/mf_guides/jp%20harrington%20guide%20-%20volume%203.pdf

This subseries was broken up into six catalog records to facilitate viewing of digital surrogates. See the other catalog records for John Peabody Harrington papers: Chumash to view surrogates for the rest of Harrington's Costanoan files.

This subseries of the Southern California/Basin series contains John P. Harrington's research on Chumash. His voluminous records on the group--totaling several hundred thousand pages--contain data on each of the six distinct dialect groups which constitute Chumash.

Material on the Obispeno, classified as Northern Chumash, consists primarily of vocabulary and contains a mixture of linguistic, ethnographic, and personal data. These elicitations from the last known native speaker, Rosario Cooper, represent the fullest and phonetically most reliable attestation of the language.

The Purisimeno notes consist mainly of words and "corrected vocabularies." Unlike the materials for the other Central Chumash dialects--Ineseno, Barbareno, and Ventureno--these records contain little grammatical information. Occasional Purisimeno forms are to be found in the Obispeno notes. In addition, much of the Purisimeno data is intermixed with that for Ineseno, as Harrington's informants were generally speakers of both.

Records relating to Ineseno are extensive and varied. They include raw field notes, texts, semantic and grammatical slipfiles, and a dictionary. The bulk of the data are from Maria Solares.

The Barbareno dialect of Central Chumash provided a constant source of interest for Harrington. He became fluent enough that he omitted glosses and translations from his later notes and was able to exchange letters with native speakers. During the course of his fieldwork, he had the unique opportunity to work with three generations of women in one family: Luisa Ignacio (around 1914); her daughter, Lucrecia Garcia (1926-1928); and her granddaughter, Mary Yee (from the 1920s to the early 1960s). Harrington also worked with Juan de Jesus Justo, a speaker of a different subdialect. While the notes Harrington recorded on Barbareno are among his most extensive, they are not as clearly organized as those for other groups. Thousands of pages of linguistic notes are totally without organization. Harrington rarely obtained paradigms. Instead, he obtained information by rechecking other sources, such as his own Ineseno dictionary, or by eliciting sentences in a random fashion. While textual material is plentiful, complete interlinear and free translations are often lacking.

Harrington's ethnographic notes on the Ventureno are among the most complete for any California Indian tribe he studied. Detailed accounts of Chumash life were obtained from the elderly Fernando Librado. Their interviews touched upon religion, perceptions of astronomy, such technologies as boat building and basket making, social structure, medical practices, and natural resources. A number of subdialects are represented in the Ventureno notes. Harrington recorded the "commonized" Ventura Mission dialect (samala) from Librado, Simplicio Pico, and Cecilio Tumamait. Interior Chumash (Cayetano and Castequeno) was obtained from Jose Juan Olivas. Other dialects mentioned include Mugu, Malibu, Ojai, and Matilija. There are also notes on the lone woman of San Nicolas Island.

In comparison with the records for the other Chumash dialects, documentation for Island Chumash (Ysleno) is extremely limited. Scattered throughout the material are references to the two dialects of Santa Cruz (Cruzeno), swaxil and kaxas. The speech of Santa Rosa and San Miguel is also mentioned.

The subseries also contains drafts of different lengths and in various stages of completion. Two documents pertain to Barbareno linguistics while the remaining papers reflect Harrington's cultural study of the Chumash.

John Peabody Harrington papers: Chumash (part 6), 1912-1961

National Anthropological Archives
Microfilm and digital surrogates of microfilm are available. See Volume 3, reels 1-96. Only original documents created by Harrington, his collaborators and field assistants, or notes given to him were microfilmed.

John P. Harrington studied the Chumash Indians of southern California more thoroughly than any other group, both linguistically and culturally. He first expressed interest in the Chumash culture as early as 1902 during summer school studies with A. L. Kroeber and P. E. Goddard. His linguistic study of the Chumash family began during his association with the School of American Archaeology and the Panama-California Exposition and continued periodically up until his death in 1961.

Electronic inventory available. Consult with archivist. For a comprehensive description of these materials, see "The papers of John Peabody Harrington in the Smithsonian Institution, 1907-1957, Volume 3, A guide to the field notes: Native American history, language, and culture of Southern California/Basin," edited by Elaine L. Mills and Ann J. Brickfield (1986). http://anthropology.si.edu/naa/harrington/pdf/mf_guides/jp%20harrington%20guide%20-%20volume%203.pdf

This subseries was broken up into six catalog records to facilitate viewing of digital surrogates. See the other catalog records for John Peabody Harrington papers: Chumash to view surrogates for the rest of Harrington's Costanoan files.

This subseries of the Southern California/Basin series contains John P. Harrington's research on Chumash. His voluminous records on the group--totaling several hundred thousand pages--contain data on each of the six distinct dialect groups which constitute Chumash.

Material on the Obispeno, classified as Northern Chumash, consists primarily of vocabulary and contains a mixture of linguistic, ethnographic, and personal data. These elicitations from the last known native speaker, Rosario Cooper, represent the fullest and phonetically most reliable attestation of the language.

The Purisimeno notes consist mainly of words and "corrected vocabularies." Unlike the materials for the other Central Chumash dialects--Ineseno, Barbareno, and Ventureno--these records contain little grammatical information. Occasional Purisimeno forms are to be found in the Obispeno notes. In addition, much of the Purisimeno data is intermixed with that for Ineseno, as Harrington's informants were generally speakers of both.

Records relating to Ineseno are extensive and varied. They include raw field notes, texts, semantic and grammatical slipfiles, and a dictionary. The bulk of the data are from Maria Solares.

The Barbareno dialect of Central Chumash provided a constant source of interest for Harrington. He became fluent enough that he omitted glosses and translations from his later notes and was able to exchange letters with native speakers. During the course of his fieldwork, he had the unique opportunity to work with three generations of women in one family: Luisa Ignacio (around 1914); her daughter, Lucrecia Garcia (1926-1928); and her granddaughter, Mary Yee (from the 1920s to the early 1960s). Harrington also worked with Juan de Jesus Justo, a speaker of a different subdialect. While the notes Harrington recorded on Barbareno are among his most extensive, they are not as clearly organized as those for other groups. Thousands of pages of linguistic notes are totally without organization. Harrington rarely obtained paradigms. Instead, he obtained information by rechecking other sources, such as his own Ineseno dictionary, or by eliciting sentences in a random fashion. While textual material is plentiful, complete interlinear and free translations are often lacking.

Harrington's ethnographic notes on the Ventureno are among the most complete for any California Indian tribe he studied. Detailed accounts of Chumash life were obtained from the elderly Fernando Librado. Their interviews touched upon religion, perceptions of astronomy, such technologies as boat building and basket making, social structure, medical practices, and natural resources. A number of subdialects are represented in the Ventureno notes. Harrington recorded the "commonized" Ventura Mission dialect (samala) from Librado, Simplicio Pico, and Cecilio Tumamait. Interior Chumash (Cayetano and Castequeno) was obtained from Jose Juan Olivas. Other dialects mentioned include Mugu, Malibu, Ojai, and Matilija. There are also notes on the lone woman of San Nicolas Island.

In comparison with the records for the other Chumash dialects, documentation for Island Chumash (Ysleno) is extremely limited. Scattered throughout the material are references to the two dialects of Santa Cruz (Cruzeno), swaxil and kaxas. The speech of Santa Rosa and San Miguel is also mentioned.

The subseries also contains drafts of different lengths and in various stages of completion. Two documents pertain to Barbareno linguistics while the remaining papers reflect Harrington's cultural study of the Chumash.

John Peabody Harrington papers: Chumash (part 4), 1912-1961

National Anthropological Archives
Microfilm and digital surrogates of microfilm are available. See Volume 3, reels 1-96. Only original documents created by Harrington, his collaborators and field assistants, or notes given to him were microfilmed.

John P. Harrington studied the Chumash Indians of southern California more thoroughly than any other group, both linguistically and culturally. He first expressed interest in the Chumash culture as early as 1902 during summer school studies with A. L. Kroeber and P. E. Goddard. His linguistic study of the Chumash family began during his association with the School of American Archaeology and the Panama-California Exposition and continued periodically up until his death in 1961.

Electronic inventory available. Consult with archivist. For a comprehensive description of these materials, see "The papers of John Peabody Harrington in the Smithsonian Institution, 1907-1957, Volume 3, A guide to the field notes: Native American history, language, and culture of Southern California/Basin," edited by Elaine L. Mills and Ann J. Brickfield (1986). http://anthropology.si.edu/naa/harrington/pdf/mf_guides/jp%20harrington%20guide%20-%20volume%203.pdf

This subseries was broken up into six catalog records to facilitate viewing of digital surrogates. See the other catalog records for John Peabody Harrington papers: Chumash to view surrogates for the rest of Harrington's Costanoan files.

This subseries of the Southern California/Basin series contains John P. Harrington's research on Chumash. His voluminous records on the group--totaling several hundred thousand pages--contain data on each of the six distinct dialect groups which constitute Chumash.

Material on the Obispeno, classified as Northern Chumash, consists primarily of vocabulary and contains a mixture of linguistic, ethnographic, and personal data. These elicitations from the last known native speaker, Rosario Cooper, represent the fullest and phonetically most reliable attestation of the language.

The Purisimeno notes consist mainly of words and "corrected vocabularies." Unlike the materials for the other Central Chumash dialects--Ineseno, Barbareno, and Ventureno--these records contain little grammatical information. Occasional Purisimeno forms are to be found in the Obispeno notes. In addition, much of the Purisimeno data is intermixed with that for Ineseno, as Harrington's informants were generally speakers of both.

Records relating to Ineseno are extensive and varied. They include raw field notes, texts, semantic and grammatical slipfiles, and a dictionary. The bulk of the data are from Maria Solares.

The Barbareno dialect of Central Chumash provided a constant source of interest for Harrington. He became fluent enough that he omitted glosses and translations from his later notes and was able to exchange letters with native speakers. During the course of his fieldwork, he had the unique opportunity to work with three generations of women in one family: Luisa Ignacio (around 1914); her daughter, Lucrecia Garcia (1926-1928); and her granddaughter, Mary Yee (from the 1920s to the early 1960s). Harrington also worked with Juan de Jesus Justo, a speaker of a different subdialect. While the notes Harrington recorded on Barbareno are among his most extensive, they are not as clearly organized as those for other groups. Thousands of pages of linguistic notes are totally without organization. Harrington rarely obtained paradigms. Instead, he obtained information by rechecking other sources, such as his own Ineseno dictionary, or by eliciting sentences in a random fashion. While textual material is plentiful, complete interlinear and free translations are often lacking.

Harrington's ethnographic notes on the Ventureno are among the most complete for any California Indian tribe he studied. Detailed accounts of Chumash life were obtained from the elderly Fernando Librado. Their interviews touched upon religion, perceptions of astronomy, such technologies as boat building and basket making, social structure, medical practices, and natural resources. A number of subdialects are represented in the Ventureno notes. Harrington recorded the "commonized" Ventura Mission dialect (samala) from Librado, Simplicio Pico, and Cecilio Tumamait. Interior Chumash (Cayetano and Castequeno) was obtained from Jose Juan Olivas. Other dialects mentioned include Mugu, Malibu, Ojai, and Matilija. There are also notes on the lone woman of San Nicolas Island.

In comparison with the records for the other Chumash dialects, documentation for Island Chumash (Ysleno) is extremely limited. Scattered throughout the material are references to the two dialects of Santa Cruz (Cruzeno), swaxil and kaxas. The speech of Santa Rosa and San Miguel is also mentioned.

The subseries also contains drafts of different lengths and in various stages of completion. Two documents pertain to Barbareno linguistics while the remaining papers reflect Harrington's cultural study of the Chumash.

John Peabody Harrington papers: Chumash (part 1), 1912-1961

National Anthropological Archives
Microfilm and digital surrogates of microfilm are available. See Volume 3, reels 1-96. Only original documents created by Harrington, his collaborators and field assistants, or notes given to him were microfilmed.

John P. Harrington studied the Chumash Indians of southern California more thoroughly than any other group, both linguistically and culturally. He first expressed interest in the Chumash culture as early as 1902 during summer school studies with A. L. Kroeber and P. E. Goddard. His linguistic study of the Chumash family began during his association with the School of American Archaeology and the Panama-California Exposition and continued periodically up until his death in 1961.

Electronic inventory available. Consult with archivist. For a comprehensive description of these materials, see "The papers of John Peabody Harrington in the Smithsonian Institution, 1907-1957, Volume 3, A guide to the field notes: Native American history, language, and culture of Southern California/Basin," edited by Elaine L. Mills and Ann J. Brickfield (1986). http://anthropology.si.edu/naa/harrington/pdf/mf_guides/jp%20harrington%20guide%20-%20volume%203.pdf

This subseries was broken up into six catalog records to facilitate viewing of digital surrogates. See the other catalog records for John Peabody Harrington papers: Chumash to view surrogates for the rest of Harrington's Chumash files.

This subseries of the Southern California/Basin series contains John P. Harrington's research on Chumash. His voluminous records on the group--totaling several hundred thousand pages--contain data on each of the six distinct dialect groups which constitute Chumash.

Material on the Obispeno, classified as Northern Chumash, consists primarily of vocabulary and contains a mixture of linguistic, ethnographic, and personal data. These elicitations from the last known native speaker, Rosario Cooper, represent the fullest and phonetically most reliable attestation of the language.

The Purisimeno notes consist mainly of words and "corrected vocabularies." Unlike the materials for the other Central Chumash dialects--Ineseno, Barbareno, and Ventureno--these records contain little grammatical information. Occasional Purisimeno forms are to be found in the Obispeno notes. In addition, much of the Purisimeno data is intermixed with that for Ineseno, as Harrington's informants were generally speakers of both.

Records relating to Ineseno are extensive and varied. They include raw field notes, texts, semantic and grammatical slipfiles, and a dictionary. The bulk of the data are from Maria Solares.

The Barbareno dialect of Central Chumash provided a constant source of interest for Harrington. He became fluent enough that he omitted glosses and translations from his later notes and was able to exchange letters with native speakers. During the course of his fieldwork, he had the unique opportunity to work with three generations of women in one family: Luisa Ignacio (around 1914); her daughter, Lucrecia Garcia (1926-1928); and her granddaughter, Mary Yee (from the 1920s to the early 1960s). Harrington also worked with Juan de Jesus Justo, a speaker of a different subdialect. While the notes Harrington recorded on Barbareno are among his most extensive, they are not as clearly organized as those for other groups. Thousands of pages of linguistic notes are totally without organization. Harrington rarely obtained paradigms. Instead, he obtained information by rechecking other sources, such as his own Ineseno dictionary, or by eliciting sentences in a random fashion. While textual material is plentiful, complete interlinear and free translations are often lacking.

Harrington's ethnographic notes on the Ventureno are among the most complete for any California Indian tribe he studied. Detailed accounts of Chumash life were obtained from the elderly Fernando Librado. Their interviews touched upon religion, perceptions of astronomy, such technologies as boat building and basket making, social structure, medical practices, and natural resources. A number of subdialects are represented in the Ventureno notes. Harrington recorded the "commonized" Ventura Mission dialect (samala) from Librado, Simplicio Pico, and Cecilio Tumamait. Interior Chumash (Cayetano and Castequeno) was obtained from Jose Juan Olivas. Other dialects mentioned include Mugu, Malibu, Ojai, and Matilija. There are also notes on the lone woman of San Nicolas Island.

In comparison with the records for the other Chumash dialects, documentation for Island Chumash (Ysleno) is extremely limited. Scattered throughout the material are references to the two dialects of Santa Cruz (Cruzeno), swaxil and kaxas. The speech of Santa Rosa and San Miguel is also mentioned.

The subseries also contains drafts of different lengths and in various stages of completion. Two documents pertain to Barbareno linguistics while the remaining papers reflect Harrington's cultural study of the Chumash.

John Peabody Harrington papers: Chumash (part 2), 1912-1961

National Anthropological Archives
Microfilm and digital surrogates of microfilm are available. See Volume 3, reels 1-96. Only original documents created by Harrington, his collaborators and field assistants, or notes given to him were microfilmed.

John P. Harrington studied the Chumash Indians of southern California more thoroughly than any other group, both linguistically and culturally. He first expressed interest in the Chumash culture as early as 1902 during summer school studies with A. L. Kroeber and P. E. Goddard. His linguistic study of the Chumash family began during his association with the School of American Archaeology and the Panama-California Exposition and continued periodically up until his death in 1961.

Electronic inventory available. Consult with archivist. For a comprehensive description of these materials, see "The papers of John Peabody Harrington in the Smithsonian Institution, 1907-1957, Volume 3, A guide to the field notes: Native American history, language, and culture of Southern California/Basin," edited by Elaine L. Mills and Ann J. Brickfield (1986). http://anthropology.si.edu/naa/harrington/pdf/mf_guides/jp%20harrington%20guide%20-%20volume%203.pdf

This subseries was broken up into seven catalog records to facilitate viewing of digital surrogates. See the other catalog records for John Peabody Harrington papers: Chumash to view surrogates for the rest of Harrington's Costanoan files.

This subseries of the Southern California/Basin series contains John P. Harrington's research on Chumash. His voluminous records on the group--totaling several hundred thousand pages--contain data on each of the six distinct dialect groups which constitute Chumash.

Material on the Obispeno, classified as Northern Chumash, consists primarily of vocabulary and contains a mixture of linguistic, ethnographic, and personal data. These elicitations from the last known native speaker, Rosario Cooper, represent the fullest and phonetically most reliable attestation of the language.

The Purisimeno notes consist mainly of words and "corrected vocabularies." Unlike the materials for the other Central Chumash dialects--Ineseno, Barbareno, and Ventureno--these records contain little grammatical information. Occasional Purisimeno forms are to be found in the Obispeno notes. In addition, much of the Purisimeno data is intermixed with that for Ineseno, as Harrington's informants were generally speakers of both.

Records relating to Ineseno are extensive and varied. They include raw field notes, texts, semantic and grammatical slipfiles, and a dictionary. The bulk of the data are from Maria Solares.

The Barbareno dialect of Central Chumash provided a constant source of interest for Harrington. He became fluent enough that he omitted glosses and translations from his later notes and was able to exchange letters with native speakers. During the course of his fieldwork, he had the unique opportunity to work with three generations of women in one family: Luisa Ignacio (around 1914); her daughter, Lucrecia Garcia (1926-1928); and her granddaughter, Mary Yee (from the 1920s to the early 1960s). Harrington also worked with Juan de Jesus Justo, a speaker of a different subdialect. While the notes Harrington recorded on Barbareno are among his most extensive, they are not as clearly organized as those for other groups. Thousands of pages of linguistic notes are totally without organization. Harrington rarely obtained paradigms. Instead, he obtained information by rechecking other sources, such as his own Ineseno dictionary, or by eliciting sentences in a random fashion. While textual material is plentiful, complete interlinear and free translations are often lacking.

Harrington's ethnographic notes on the Ventureno are among the most complete for any California Indian tribe he studied. Detailed accounts of Chumash life were obtained from the elderly Fernando Librado. Their interviews touched upon religion, perceptions of astronomy, such technologies as boat building and basket making, social structure, medical practices, and natural resources. A number of subdialects are represented in the Ventureno notes. Harrington recorded the "commonized" Ventura Mission dialect (samala) from Librado, Simplicio Pico, and Cecilio Tumamait. Interior Chumash (Cayetano and Castequeno) was obtained from Jose Juan Olivas. Other dialects mentioned include Mugu, Malibu, Ojai, and Matilija. There are also notes on the lone woman of San Nicolas Island.

In comparison with the records for the other Chumash dialects, documentation for Island Chumash (Ysleno) is extremely limited. Scattered throughout the material are references to the two dialects of Santa Cruz (Cruzeno), swaxil and kaxas. The speech of Santa Rosa and San Miguel is also mentioned.

The subseries also contains drafts of different lengths and in various stages of completion. Two documents pertain to Barbareno linguistics while the remaining papers reflect Harrington's cultural study of the Chumash.

Sound recording OCT 1921

National Anthropological Archives
Digitization and preparation of these materials for online access has been funded through generous support from the Arcadia Fund.

SC

Disc Note:BAE Lr Harrington

Aluminum disc

Ventureño Sound Recording

National Anthropological Archives
Digitization and preparation of these materials for online access has been funded through generous support from the Arcadia Fund.

Shellac disc

Sides 1 and 2: Translating Ventureño into English.
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