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Zesse-nemeoxtoz = (Cheyenne songs)

Smithsonian Libraries
31 hymn texts, with melodies indicated.

Springer 23607

Also available online.

Elecresource

Truman Michelson notes on phonetic correspondences of Cheyenne with other Algonquian languages, circa 1931-1932

National Anthropological Archives
Digital surrogates are available online.

Digitization and preparation of these materials for online access has been funded through generous support from the Arcadia Fund.

Citation corrected from 3188 (part) to 3188-a. 2/28/12

Title updated from "Phonetic correspondences of Cheyenne with Algonquian ca. 1931-1932" 4/2/2014.

Set of card files with handwritten notes by Truman Michelson on phonetic correspondences of Cheyenne with other Algonquian languages.

Three Cheyenne stories by Wolf Chief, 1910

National Anthropological Archives
Digital surrogates are available online.

Digitization and preparation of these materials for online access has been funded through generous support from the Arcadia Fund.

Three stories in Cheyenne by Wolf Chief, with English translations by William Somers. The titles are "Plover Wings," "Buffalo Horns," and "Story about otter." These were collected by Truman Michelson at the Northern Cheyenne Reservation in Montana.

Southern Cheyenne vocabulary from Mack Haag, 1931

National Anthropological Archives
Digital surrogates are available online.

Digitization and preparation of these materials for online access has been funded through generous support from the Arcadia Fund.

See MS 3215-a for associated notes.

Title changed from "Southern Cheyenne vocabulary, Summer, 1931" 4/2/2014.

Southern Cheyenne vocabulary collected from Mack Haag in Oklahoma by Truman Michelson in the summer of 1931. The notes are handwritten by Michelson on note cards and appear to be extracted from his notes in MS 3215-a.

Southern Cheyenne text and vocabulary collected from Mack Haag, 1931

National Anthropological Archives
Digital surrogates are available online.

Digitization and preparation of these materials for online access has been funded through generous support from the Arcadia Fund.

See also 3215-b for vocabulary notes from Mack Haag.

Title changed from "Southern Cheyenne text with interlinear translation Summer, 1931" 4/2/2014.

Southern Cheyenne text and vocabulary collected from Mack Haag by Truman Michelson in Oklahoma in the summer of 1931. The text is a Cheyenne story of the fox and the coyote handwritten in English by Haag. The vocabulary notes are in Michelson's hand and appears to be unrelated to the text but associated with MS 3215-b. The notes consist of Cheyenne words and phrases, some of which include English translations.

Truman Michelson notes on Cheyenne grammar and stems, undated

National Anthropological Archives
Digital surrogates are available online.

Digitization and preparation of these materials for online access has been funded through generous support from the Arcadia Fund.

Title changed from Cheyenne grammatical notes, including list of "Cheyenne Stems" 4/3/2014.

Truman Michelson's handwritten notes on Cheyenne grammar and stems. Includes English translations.

Cheyenne stories and vocabulary collected by Truman Michelson, 1910

National Anthropological Archives
Digital surrogates are available online.

Digitization and preparation of these materials for online access has been funded through generous support from the Arcadia Fund.

Title updated from "Text" 4/1/2014.

Stories in Cheyenne by Wolf Chief, William Somers, White Medicine, White Bull, Sweet Medicine, and Hairy Hand, with interlineal and free English translations by Somers and and a few free translations by Truman Michelson. Also eight pages of Cheyenne vocabulary with English translations. White Bull was of Cheyenne and Arapaho background, and a few of his stories are identified as Arapaho in Michelson's notes.

Cheyenne text and pronouns chart collected by Truman Michelson, undated

National Anthropological Archives
Digital surrogates are available online.

Digitization and preparation of these materials for online access has been funded through generous support from the Arcadia Fund.

Title changed from "Miscellaneous notes on Cheyenne courtship and marriage customs" 4/3/2014.

Text handwritten in English by Mack Haag on Cheyenne courtship and marriage customs, with a reference to the Cheyenne and Dakota term for "woman." Also a pronouns chart.

Cheyenne linguistic and ethnological notes from Mack Haag, undated

National Anthropological Archives
Digital surrogates are available online.

Digitization and preparation of these materials for online access has been funded through generous support from the Arcadia Fund.

Title changed from "Cheyenne Vocabulary and linguistic notes, with interspersed ethnological notes" 4/3/2014.

Truman Michelson's handwritten notes on Cheyenne linguistics and ethnology from his work with Mack Haag, a Southern Cheyenne, in Oklahoma. The notes are primarily linguistic in nature and include vocabulary with English translations and notes on phonetics. Ethnological notes are interspersed and cover topics such as joking relationships, the concept of sickness, puberty, marriageable age, and counting coup.

Truman Michelson notes on Cheyenne vocabulary with comparisons to Central Algonquian languages, circa 1930s

National Anthropological Archives
Digital surrogates are available online.

Digitization and preparation of these materials for online access has been funded through generous support from the Arcadia Fund.

Title changed from "Some restored words which are difficult phonetically; some new words extracted from Petter 1930s" 5/27/2014.

Cards containing Truman Michelson's handwritten notes on Cheyenne vocabulary with comparisons to Central Algonquian (Fox, Cree, Delaware, Ojibwa, etc.) terms. The Bureau of American Ethnology catalog card indicates that some words were "extracted from Petter," most likely a reference to Rodolphe Petter's English-Cheyenne Dictionary (1915).

Cheyenne vocabulary and a few ethnological notes collected from Mack Haag, undated

National Anthropological Archives
Digital surrogates are available online.

Digitization and preparation of these materials for online access has been funded through generous support from the Arcadia Fund.

Title changed from "Southern Cheyenne vocabulary ca. 1931."

Note cards with Truman Michelson's handwritten notes from his work with Mack Haag, a Southern Cheyenne, in Oklahoma. The notes consist primarily of Cheyenne vocabulary with English translations and a few ethnological notes.

Truman Michelson notes on Cheyenne phonology and vocabulary, circa 1931-1934

National Anthropological Archives
Digital surrogates are available online.

Digitization and preparation of these materials for online access has been funded through generous support from the Arcadia Fund.

Title changed from "Cheyenne phonology" 4/3/2014.

Truman Michelson's handwritten notes on Cheyenne phonology and vocabulary with English translations.

Cheyenne vocabulary with occasional ethnographic notes collected by Truman Michelson, 1929 July

National Anthropological Archives
Digital surrogates are available online.

Digitization and preparation of these materials for online access has been funded through generous support from the Arcadia Fund.

Title changed from "Cheyenne Vocabulary, with occasional ethnographic notes fJuly 1929" 5/28/2014.

Notebook containing Truman Michelson's handwritten notes from his work among the Southern Cheyenne in Concho, Oklahoma. The notes consist primarily of vocabulary with some ethnological notes interspersed. The vocabulary includes comparative terms in Só'taeo'o (Sutaio). Ethnological topics include medicine bundles, "doctors" who can understand babies, "shaking lodge," and singing medicine arrow and sun dance songs. There is also an index card with notes on prophecy lodge.

Cheyenne stories and ethnological notes collected by Truman Michelson, 1910

National Anthropological Archives
Digital surrogates are available online.

Digitization and preparation of these materials for online access has been funded through generous support from the Arcadia Fund.

Title changed from "Ethnological notes on Cheyenne origin myths, camp divisions, war societies, weapons, dances, camp circle, and personal narratives and stories, August-September 1919" 4/1/2014.

Cheyenne stories and ethnological notes collected by Truman Michelson at the Northern Cheyenne Indian Reservation in Montana. Michelson worked with William Somers, White Bull, White Eagle, Albert Duster, Wolf Chief, Left Hand Bull, American Horse, Grasshopper, Iron Shirt, Medicine Top, Handing Crow, Sweet Medicine, and Bull Thigh. The topics include camp divisions, war societies, weapons, dances, camp circle, personal narratives, and origin myths. Somers, who served as translator for Michelson, also authored many of the stories in this collection. These include: "Story of Great Foolish Dogs Society," "Morning Star or White Rabbit," "The Star Husband," "Indian looking for work," and "Story of Pipe and Smoke."

Truman Michelson notes on Cheyenne and Sutaio, 1913 August 11-15

National Anthropological Archives
Negative microfilm

Digital surrogates are available online.

Digitization and preparation of these materials for online access has been funded through generous support from the Arcadia Fund.

Title changed from "Notes on Cheyenne and Sutaio. August 11-15, 1913" 4/7/2014.

Cheyenne and Sutaio notes collected by Truman Michelson from Wolf Chief, Bull Thigh, and Wrapped Hair, with Milton Whiteman as interpreter. Subjects include: Sutaio-Cheyenne history, Cheyenne relationship terms, joking relationship, English-Cheyenne-Sutaio vocabulary, Cheyenne soldier societies (Red Hoof society, Dog Soldiers, Elk society, Fox soldiers), Sutaio tales (Everybody starving, Prairie chicken), Sutaio customs, Cheyenne customs, and berdaches. According to the BAE catalog card, these notes were collected in Clinton, Oklahoma, which is most likely incorrect. His 1913-1914 correspondence in the Records of the BAE and the 35th BAE Annual Report indicate that he conducted fieldwork on the Sutaio during this period at Tongue River Reservation in Montana.

Truman Michelson notes on Southern Cheyenne and Arapaho story, 1930 June

National Anthropological Archives
Digital surrogates are available online.

Digitization and preparation of these materials for online access has been funded through generous support from the Arcadia Fund.

Citation corrected from 3188 (part) to 3188-b on 2/28/12.

Title changed from "Miscellaneous notes June 9, 11, 13, 1930" 5/22/2014.

Place supplied from 47th Annual Report of Bureau of American Ethnology, page 2.

Handwritten Cheyenne linguistic and ethnographic notes and anthropometric data collected by Truman Michelson in Oklahoma. Much of the information is from his work with Mack Haag. The materials include vocabulary and notes on grammar and phonetics; a short story in Arapaho about spider with an interlineal English translation; notes on Cheyenne family and kinship relationships, marriage, divorce, adultery, illegitimacy, incest, pregnancy, death, etc.; and anthropometrical data on 22 Cheyenne adult males, identified by name and age.

Southern Cheyenne legends. June, 1932

National Anthropological Archives
Digital surrogates are available online.

Digitization and preparation of these materials for online access has been funded through generous support from the Arcadia Fund.

Legends: "The Stinking Owl, "The Buffalo Bones," "Crazy Lime," "Twins," are in Mack Haagʹs handwriting (cf. Ms. 3335, v. 1); Harry Black is given as informant for the latter two. "The Last Hero," "The White Buffalo," "The Four Warriors," "The Spider and Coyote," and "Bear and Skunk," are in another handwriting (apparently the same as that in Manuscript 3342, 3220, and the unidentified writing in 3335). Includes note by Michelson on witchcraft, on reverse of 1 page about halfway through tablet.

Anonymous drawing, possibly Cheyenne, of warrior on horseback charging enemy on foot, n.d

National Anthropological Archives
Inscribed on verso "O-kum-kate-kat, Little Wolf" Identified in records as Cheyenne, source unknown

Book of Cheyenne drawings by Little Skunk and unknown Cheyenne artists, with correspondence concerning drawings, ca. 1878-1902

National Anthropological Archives
P.C. Knox (1853-1921), author of one letter, was appointed Attorney General of the United States under the McKinley Administration and continued to serve until 1904 when he was appointed to a vacancy in the Senate. Knox was reelected to this position in 1905, resigning in 1909 to join the Cabinet under Taft's administration. For more information about P.C. Knox see Archibald Dodds' The Public Services of Philander Chase Knox, 1950, PhD. Dissertation, University of Pittsburgh. Col. William C. Sanger, to whom the letter is addressed, was appointed as Assistant Secretary of War in 1901.

The book was purchased by the Smithsonian from W.H. Kelly of Glasgow, Scotland in 1987. It was part of a collection of American Indian material, the remainder of which was accessioned into the artifact collection. Kelly could provide no information on the history of the materials, which he had acquired as discards from an auction house where he was employed some years previous. None of the other material appears to be Cheyenne.

The content of the images is not consistent with the accompanying identification that they depict the Northern Cheyenne outbreak of 1878. The names Little Skunk and Hermann Hauser do not appear in the index to the records of the Cheyenne and Arapaho Agency held at the Oklahoma Historical Society, but the latter's name appears as "Herman Hauser" in separate material at the Oklahoma Historical Society relating to Fort Reno.

Bound notebook of ruled paper with 89 drawings, primarily scenes of warfare. The drawings are the work of several different artists and depict battles with several different tribes as well as with White civilians and Army troops. Slip case embossed with title "Outbreak of the Cheyenne Indians 1878. Sign Language Written by the Chief 'Little Skunk'." Three letters regarding history and identification of the book inserted. One insert, a note dated September 10, 1892, and signed by A. Wernher, states "this book was presented to me in 1879 by Hermann Hauser of the Q. Mr. Dept. at Fort Reno, Ind. Terr. Hauser was affiliated by marriage to the Cheyenne tribe of Indians and assured me that the book represented in sign language (i.e. drawings) the outbreak of the Cheyenne Indians at Fort Reno Ind Terry and their raid through Kansas to the North in 1878, written by the Cheyenne Indian "Little Skunk." Another insert is a letter dated February 2, 1897, written by Frank Hamilton Cushing returning the book to a Colonel Cushing and asking to see it again later. The third insert is a letter dated March 11, 1902, written by P. C. Knox to Colonel William C. Sanger with thanks for letting him see the book.

Texts and notes on Medicine arrows of the Cheyenne from Bull Thigh and William Somers, 1910 September 7-13

National Anthropological Archives
Negative microfilm on file

Digital surrogates are available online.

Digitization and preparation of these materials for online access has been funded through generous support from the Arcadia Fund.

Title changed from "Notes on Medicine arrows of the Cheyenne September 7-13, 1910" 4/8/2014.

Text and notes collected by Truman Michelson in Montana from Bull Thigh and William Somers on the sacred Medicine arrows of the Cheyenne. The texts are primarily in English and detail the origin of the arrows and describe the Medicine arrows ceremony. The prayers and songs are in Cheyenne. Also includes notes on Sun Dance.

The following is a list of the contents: (Folder 1) "The 4 arrows." Bull Thigh, Somers. pages 1-23. (Folder 2) "Further information on the 4 arrows." September 10, 1910. Somers. pages 1-24. (Folder 2) Notes on Sun Dance from Bull Thigh. September 10, 1910. pages 1-2. (Folder 3) "Somers fills in gaps of 4 arrows left out by the priest (tells own experiences)." September 9, 1910. Somers pages 1-43. (Folder 4) "3rd day before the ceremony proper." 7 pages. (Folder 5) "The 4 arrows; 4th day of the ceremonies."September 13, 1910. Somers. pages 1-10. (Folder 6) "Words of 1 arrow song; 4th song." September 7. Bull Thigh, Somers. 9 pages. "Arrow song with words," prayers, oaths, creed. September 13. Somers. 11 pages. (Folder 7) Diagrams illustrating parts of the ceremonies, Somers. 5 pages.

Assetosemeheo heamoxovistavatoz no hosz Maheoneeszistotoz

Smithsonian Libraries
English title: "The Pilgrim's progress and some Bible portions".

Also available online.

Elecresource

Anonymous drawing, possibly Cheyenne, of warrior, identified by name glyph, holding scalp he has taken from fallen enemy, n.d

National Anthropological Archives
Name glyph interpreted in inscription: "Iiskowits, Porcupine." Inscription identified in records as Cheyenne, source unknown.

Cheyenne Indian Sundance ca. 1937

Human Studies Film Archives
Cataloging supported by Smithsonian Institution Women's Committee

Footage of a northern Cheyenne Sundance probably filmed between the mid- to late 1930s in LameDeer, Montana. Documentation includes encampment and tarp-covered sundance lodge, both exterior and interior shots; male participants taking coals from the lodge fire; dancers with eagle bone whistles; shots of Indian and white spectators; scenes of fancy dance with male dancers in eagle feathered bustles and headdresses; and miscellaneous shots of Indians harvesting root crops and children at play.

John Peabody Harrington papers: Algonquian, circa 1907-circa 1957

National Anthropological Archives
Microfilm and digital surrogates of microfilm are available. See Volume 6, reel 1. Only original documents created by Harrington, his collaborators and field assistants, or notes given to him were microfilmed.

Electronic inventory available. Consult with archivist. Also see "The papers of John Peabody Harrington in the Smithsonian Institution, 1907-1957, Volume 6: A guide to the field notes: Native American history, language, and culture of Northeast/Southeast," edited by Elaine L. Mills and Ann J. Brickfield (1987). http://anthropology.si.edu/naa/harrington/pdf/mf_guides/jp%20harrington%20guide%20-%20volume%206.pdf

This subseries of the Northeast/Southeast series contains John P. Harrington's Algonquian research. It consists primarily of material he collected; there is very little original data, most of which are undated. The topics covered are Cheyenne grammar, Fox linguistic notes, Menominee grammar, Miami-Peoria grammar, Mohegan-Pequot-Montauk vocabulary, Montagnais miscellaneous notes, Nanticoke-Conoy-Unalachtigo linguistic notes, Ojibwa linguistic notes, Potawatomi linguistic notes, and comparative and miscellaneous notes.

The Cheyenne material consist of two pages of grammatical excerpts from Rodolphe Petter's English-Cheyenne Dictionary (1915).

The Fox notes stem from conversations which Harrington had with Truman Michelson on the Fox syllabary and grammar. One note is dated September 24, 1924; others are undated. One page gives the etymology of the word Chicago and a Potawatomi equivalent. Phonetic material (former B.A.E. MS 6021 pt. and 6025pt.) is based on William Jones's "Algonquian (Fox)" (1911). A bibliography is included, mainly on Michelson's publications and manuscripts which he submitted to the B.A.E.

The Menominee files contain a phonetic key from Leonard Bloomfield's Menomini Texts (1928), a short report on a conversation with Michelson (former B.A.E. MS 6025pt. and 6030), and a brief description of Menominee tentshaking was excerpted from W. J. Hoffman's The Menomini Indians (1896).

Miami-Peoria vocabulary were copied from Albert Gatschet's B.A.E. manuscripts 3025 and 3026b. (Those entries marked 3026b are no longer listed as part of that B.A.E. manuscript.)

An 1890 copy of a 1798 Montauk vocabulary taken by John Lyon Gardiner was loaned to Harrington by Foster H. Saville. There are also a three-page typescript of this manuscript and several pages of a Mohegan-Pequot bibliography.

For Montagnais, there are three bibliographical notes. Two placenames came from J.N.B. Hewitt in November 1926.

Reading notes on Nanticoke, Conoy, and Unalachtigo were taken principally from Speck's The Nanticoke and Conoy Indians . .. (1927) and from Hodge's "Handbook" (1907). Some linguistic and ethnohistoric material is included and there is a brief bibliography.

Ojibwa forms the largest portion of this subseries. It includes notes from a joint interview conducted most likely in 1940 with C. F. Voegelin and his informant, Gregor McGregor, who was technically considered a speaker of Ottawa. There are also notes Harrington took of Voegelin's lecture at the University of Michigan on June 25, 1940 (former B.A.E. MS 6020pt.). There is a slight emphasis on placenames in an otherwise random vocabulary. From James Hammond Trumbull's Notes on Forty Algonkin Versions of the Lord's Prayer (1873), Harrington copied the Southern Chippeway version (pp. 74 -75) and penciled in a slightly different English translation. A final potpourri of undated notes includes a miscellaneous vocabulary from secondary sources and a few pages of grammatical material. The etymologies of several Ojibwa words are briefly developed. Frederic Baraga's A Dictionary of the Otchipwe Language is the most frequently cited source (former B.A.E. MS 6020pt. and 6025pt.).

The Potawatomi files contain material from Harrington's interview with Chief Simon Kahquados in Blackwell, Wisconsin (n.d.) with whom he recorded general ethnographic information, particularly regarding the loss of Potawatomi lands due to Indian Office policies and illegal acts of the Menominee. A brief vocabulary is included. Unrelated to this interview is a Potawatomi phoneme chart.

Comparative material includes reading notes regarding the earliest appearances of certain Algonquian phonetic sounds. Harrington consulted primarily the works of Sir Isaac Pitman, Jean Claude Mathevet (Nipissing, Abnaki), and Silas Tertius Rand (Micmac). Additional peripheral bibliographical information is identified in the notes. The only date recorded is March 26, 1951. There are other scattered reading notes with Menominee, Cree, Fox, and Ojibwa phonetic comparisons, based mainly on Leonard Bloomfield's Menomini Texts (1938) and Plains Cree Texts (1934). One page of Arapaho terms was copied from Kroeber.

In the category of general linguistic and ethnographic notes (former B.A.E. ms. 6025pt.), information results from various conversations with fellow linguists: Truman Michelson and J.N.B. Hewitt on September 24, 1924; Hewitt in November 1924 and November 1926; Michelson in October 1930; and Michelson and Frank G. Speck in May 1934. Under the heading "The Southern Delawares," Harrington arranged random information on the Virginia Indians, touching briefly on history and ethnography. He included some Abnaki, Cree, and Cherokee linguistic terms, as well as a general bibliography. Vocabulary material in this series (former B.A.E. MS 6025pt.) consists of terms from various Algonquian languages, most probably taken from unidentified printed sources. One note gives "The Chief from Mass[achusetts]" as an informant. One group of terms is compared with Natick words and with a vocabulary recorded by Roger Williams.
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