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Author Interview: Yiyun Li [in Asian American Literary Review]

Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Program

To become a writer, Yiyun Li left behind everything familiar: her birth country (China), her first language (Mandarin), her family...

The post Author Interview: Yiyun Li [in Asian American Literary Review] appeared first on BookDragon.

Event Recap: “Gourmet Intersections: Asian-Latino Food Crossings”

Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Program
This is an event recap of Gourmet Intersections: Asian-Latino Food Crossings (July 24, 2013). To view more photos, click here. The music playlist is also available here. Recap by guest blogger Pat Tanumihardja When you think of Asian-Latino fusion cuisine, Korean bulgogi beef tacos—the darling of the food truck world—will likely cross your mind. However, […]

Asian American Identity - Smithsonian Portraits of Encounter

Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center
Video by Voice of America http://www.voanews.com/english/news/usa/Asian-American-Artists-Explore-Their-Identity--130422658.html More info: http://apanews.si.edu/2011/05/17/portraits-of-encounter/ http://www.npg.si.edu/exhibit/encounter/ The Smithsonian's National Portrait Gallery and the Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Program have collaborated to mount the Smithsonian's first major showcase of contemporary Asian American portraiture. Through the work of seven artists from across the country and around the world, the exhibition offers thought-provoking interpretations of the Asian American experience and representations against and beyond the stereotypes that have obscured the complexity of being Asian in America. This installation of Portraiture Now will feature seven artists, each of whom will show several works. The artists are: - Cindy Hwang (CYJO), New York, Beijing - Hye Yeon Nam, Atlanta and New York - Shizu Saldamando, Los Angeles - Roger Shimomura, Lawrence, KS - Satomi Shirai, New York - Tam Tran, Memphis, TN - Hong Chun Zhang, Lawrence, KS

Asian Pacific American Program Collections

SI Center for Learning and Digital Access
Webpage featuring the Smithsonian's newest acquisitions such as posters, quilts, and costumes related to the story of Asian Pacific Americans. Viewers are invited to donate objects and submit comments.

Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Program

SI Center for Learning and Digital Access
The Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Program (APAP) provides vision, leadership, and support for all Asian Pacific American (APA) activities at the Smithsonian, while serving as the Smithsonian's liaison to APA communities. Through exhibitions, programs, research, and collaborations, APAP reflects experiences of Asian Pacific Americans, their role in U.S. history, and empowers them by increasing their sense of inclusion in our national culture.

Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Program orientation video

Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center
Part of the "Welcome to Smithsonian" videos. This video introduces the Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Program.

Portraiture Now: Asian American Portraits of Encounter at the Smithsonian

Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center
Video by BBC America http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-us-canada-14500419 More info: http://apanews.si.edu/2011/05/17/portraits-of-encounter/ http://www.npg.si.edu/exhibit/encounter/ The Smithsonian's National Portrait Gallery and the Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Program have collaborated to mount the Smithsonian's first major showcase of contemporary Asian American portraiture. Through the work of seven artists from across the country and around the world, the exhibition offers thought-provoking interpretations of the Asian American experience and representations against and beyond the stereotypes that have obscured the complexity of being Asian in America. This installation of Portraiture Now will feature seven artists, each of whom will show several works. The artists are: - Cindy Hwang (CYJO), New York, Beijing - Hye Yeon Nam, Atlanta and New York - Shizu Saldamando, Los Angeles - Roger Shimomura, Lawrence, KS - Satomi Shirai, New York - Tam Tran, Memphis, TN - Hong Chun Zhang, Lawrence, KS

Tour Schedule for the Exhibition “I Want the Wide American Earth”

Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Program
This schedule will be updated frequently as we get more venue confirmations. If you are interested in hosting the exhibition or bringing it to your city, click here for more details. There are two copies of the banner exhibition available to be toured. The first list includes confirmed or tentative venues, the second list has […]

Google Hangout for Asian Pacific American Heritage Month

Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center
What happens when you bring together Lisa Ling, Angry Asian Man, the White House Initiative on Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders, and the Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center? A seriously amazing conversation about Asian Pacific American Heritage Month! We're going to chat about the significance of APA Heritage Month and this year's theme, "I Want the Wide American Earth," and we'll take questions from you -- our supporters and fans. Send us questions by including #may1apa in your tweet, leaving a message on this event page, or emailing us at APAC@si.edu. Join us on May 1 from 3:00pm -- 3:45pm (EDT) for the Smithsonian's first Google+ Hangout. The video link will go live at the start time. You can watch via YouTube as these panelists participate in the Hangout. The Hangout will be archived on YouTube so you can watch it later at your convenience. Panelists include: * Konrad Ng, Director of the Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center. * Kiran Ahuja, Executive Director of the White House Initiative on Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders (WHIAAPI). * Phil Yu, the blogger behind Angry Asian Man. * Lisa Ling, journalist, writer, and host of "Our America with Lisa Ling." Moderator: Gautam Raghavan, Associate Director of Public Engagement at the White House. This Google+ Hangout is a partnership between the Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center and the White House Initiative on Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders. For more information about Asian Pacific American Heritage Month events at the Smithsonian, visit http://apa.si.edu/heritage You may be wondering: What is a Google+ Hangout? Google+ Hangout is a free video chat service from Google that enables both one-on-one chats and group chats with up to ten people at a time.

Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Program Multimedia

SI Center for Learning and Digital Access
Webpage displaying videos, photos, interactives, and audio from the Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Program.

Young Historians, Living Histories Project

Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Program
The Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center is launching the Young Historians, Living Histories Project to engage underserved young people in Asian Pacific American communities to explore, contextualize, and deepen their understanding of their own history and their community.  During a one-week workshop, participants will learn about the Asian Pacific American experience through the exhibition I […]

Asian Americans For Bush-Cheney

National Museum of American History

Introducing Adriel Luis, Curator of Digital and Emerging Media

Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Program
The Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center (APAC) is excited to welcome Adriel Luis to the team as Curator of Digital and Emerging Media. Launching the first position of its kind at the Smithsonian, Luis will lead a campaign to establish APAC as a “third space” in the museum world – engaging new audiences through online […]

Happy Holidays from Konrad Ng, APAC Director

Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Program
2013 has been a seriously amazing year for the Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center: 2 major exhibitions; 2 pop-up museums; 5 public programs; 2 online education apps; 2 national workshops; 1 digital exhibition catalog; 1 online comic book, more than 7,000 exhibition posters; and reaching the lives of more than 750,000 people. Our success in […]

Exploring Asian American History with "I Want the Wide American Earth: An Asian Pacific American Story"

Smithsonian Institution Traveling Exhibition Service
In the first exhibition of its kind, the Smithsonian celebrates Asian Pacific American history across a multitude of incredibly diverse cultures, and explores how Asian Pacific Americans (APAs) have shaped and been shaped by the course of our nation’s history. I Want the Wide American Earth, created by SITES and the Smithsonian's Asian Pacific Amerian Center, is as much a chronicle of the struggles of APAs as it is a story of their resilience and achievement. The exhibition carries the narrative to the present day and celebrates APA individuals and communities that continue to flourish and contribute to every arena...

Food Intersections in Brazil

Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Program
By Zelideth María Rivas, guest blogger This blog is part of the Gourmet Intersections program of Intersections as American Life: the Smithsonian Asian-Latino Festival 2013. When asked to do a guest blog on my travels in Brazil, I wondered if I should go out and look for Asian-Latino food connections or just wander into their […]

What’s the difference between a paratha and a tortilla?

Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Program
By Rishi Reddi, guest blogger This blog is part of the Gourmet Intersections program of Intersections as American Life: the Smithsonian Asian-Latino Festival 2013. What’s the difference between a paratha and a tortilla?  Or, curried beans and refried beans? A little-known community that bridged South Asians and Mexicans sprang up in the Imperial Valley of […]

Brazilian Pastéis Go Japanese

Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Program
By Zelideth María Rivas, guest blogger This blog is part of the Gourmet Intersections program of Intersections as American Life: the Smithsonian Asian-Latino Festival 2013. Turnovers. Empanadas. Pastelillos. Pastel. Let’s face it, we can’t have just one: pastéis. Many Latin American cultures have them. All Brazilian lanchonetes, bars, and feiras serve them. But only Yoka’s […]

Mochi and Tamales in Los Angeles

Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Program
By Mary Yogi, guest blogger This blog is part of the Gourmet Intersections program of Intersections as American Life: the Smithsonian Asian-Latino Festival 2013. Between Christmas and New Year’s Day, my family’s “To Do” list: Wash and soak 200 pounds of rice. Make enchiladas. Roll sushi. Peel and chop tomatillos and green chiles and cook […]

A Taste of Barrio Chino: Green Beans with Peanuts and Chile de Arbol

Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Program
By Pati Jinich, guest blogger and Gourmet Intersections panelist Before she died, my maternal grandmother, whom we called Lali gave me Gloria Miller’s Thousand Recipe Chinese Cookbook. She was fascinated with Chinese cookery. She was also very good at it. What she loved the most were the stir-fry dishes: fast, tasty and healthy. So, she […]

Asian Pacific American Program Introduction

Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage
Curator video of Phil Nash, APA curator [Catalog No. - CFV10245; Copyright - 2010 Smithsonian Institution]

Asian-American Superhero The Green Turtle Returns!

Smithsonian Magazine

Back in 1944, Chinese-American comic book artist Chu Hing created a superhero named the Green Turtle, who appeared in five issues of Blazing Comics before disappearing into the night. There were rumors that Hing intended The Green Turtle to be the first Asian-American superhero, but was prevented by his publisher. So in 2014, cartoonist Gene Luen Yang and illustrator Sonny Liew resurrected The Green Turtle, definitively establishing his Chinese-American backstory in a graphic novel called The Shadow Hero. Now, in celebration of Asian Pacific American Heritage Month, the Green Turtle has returned and is starring in his own comic book, reports Charles Pulliam-Moore at i09.

According to a press release, the comic is being distributed at Panda Express restaurants along with the kid’s meals, or it can be read online here. “Sonny and I are so excited to work with Panda Express. Together, we created 'Shadow Hero Comics #1' to celebrate not just Asian Pacific American heroes, but all of the heroes in our lives,” Yang says in the press release. “A hero can be anyone who inspires us to never give up. We hope stories like ours will encourage young readers to embrace their own originality and never give up on themselves, no matter what the odds may be.”

Hansi Lo Wang at NPR reports that there were rumors that when Hing originally created the Green Turtle, he intended the character to be Chinese-American. But his publisher didn’t think readers would appreciate an Asian character while the U.S. was in the midst of a war with Japan. While the characters skin was printed in eraser-pink, Yang tells Wang that there are clues in the original comics that the Green Turtle was of Asian ancestry. “He almost always has his back turned toward the audience, so all you see is his cape,” Yang says. “When he is turned around, something is blocking his face. It's either hidden by shadow, or he's punching and his arm is in the way. Or there's a piece of furniture in the way.”

The subject of those comics is also a clue—the Green Turtle leads a group of Chinese people against occupying Japanese forces. When he revived the character in 2014, Yang—a MacArthur “Genius Grant” recipient whose graphic novels, American Born Chinese and Boxers & Saints were both nominated for the National Book Award—decided to give The Green Turtle an decisively Asian-American origin story. Pulliam-Moore reports that the characters's true identity is Hank Chu, a young man working in his family’s grocery store in the Chinatown of a fictional California city of San Incendio. While he doesn’t have super strength or the ability fly, The Green Turtle is able to dodge bullets and other projectiles.

Super heroes and their secret identities have long resonated with people from immigrant and minority families. That’s because, like super heroes, they must navigate different identities within the culture. “Every superhero has this superhero identity and a civilian identity,” Yang says. “A lot of their lives are about code switching. It’s about switching from one mode of expectations to another mode of expectations. And I really think that mirrors something in the immigrant's kid’s life.”

In the new comic book, The Green Turtle teams up with Miss Stardust, an alien from another planet who is also interested in protecting the citizens of San Incendio—and the Earth. The comic is set in the 1940s—during the golden age of comic books—and includes the kitschy villains of The Roller Rocket Gang, a squad of roller skating robbers.

The Transcontinental Railroad and the Asian-American Story

National Postal Museum
2019 marks 150 years since the completion of the Transcontinental Railroad. The story of postal history in this country is very much one of...

Portrature Now: Asian American Portraits of Encounter

SI Center for Learning and Digital Access
Exhibition displays the diversity of contemporary Asian American identity. Portraits offer representations against and beyond the stereotypes that have long obscured the complexity of being Asian in America.
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