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Smithsonian American Art Museum

Smithsonian American Art Museum
Explore a "day in the life" of the Smithsonian American Art Museum, the nation's first collection of American art and home to one of the largest and most inclusive collections of American art in the world. Located in the heart of the Washington DC, the museum offers an array of programs, tours, concerts, and special exhibitions inspired by the dynamic character and imagination of America's people and artists. AmericanArt.si.edu @americanart 8th and G Streets, NW Washington, DC Produced by: Smithsonian American Art Museum Betsy Broun The Margaret and Terry Stent Director Smithsonian American Art Museum Video Production: Zack Frank, Carlos Parada and Becky Harlan Music by: Dexter Britain http://dexterbritain.co.uk/ All Rights Reserved. © 2013

Slow Art at American Art

Smithsonian American Art Museum

African American Art Curator Talk

Smithsonian American Art Museum
Virginia Mecklenburg, senior curator, explores the work of Jacob Lawrence, Norman Lewis, Lois Mailou Jones, Melvin Edwards, and other artists featured in the exhibition African American Art: Harlem Renaissance, Civil Rights Era, and Beyond. These artists participated in ongoing dialogues about art, black identity, and individual rights that engaged American society in the twentieth century. Using documentary realism, painterly expressionism, and the postmodern assemblage of found objects, they rewrote American history and its art.

Q and Art: American Art's Three-Way Portrait

Smithsonian American Art Museum
ThumbnailCan you tell me more about Three-Way Portrait of Thomas Jefferson, James Monroe and Unidentified Native American? What is the history of this type of artwork?

American Art in a Global Context: Keynote

Smithsonian American Art Museum
Symposium: "Art in a Global Context" Thursday, September 28, 2006 Keynote Address Introduction: Ned Rifkin, Undersecretary for Art, Smithsonian Institution Presenter: Adam Gopnik, The New Yorker, "Santayana's Boomerang and Barr's Torpedo: On the Unity of American Art" This three-day symposium looked at American art in a global context—from circum-Atlantic migrations in the eighteenth century to European training and travel in the late nineteenth century; from the export of U.S. culture and media in the twentieth century to the impact of immigration and globalization on the nation's visual arts in the new millennium. For more information: http://www.americanart.si.edu/research/symposia/2006/.

Watch This! - Smithsonian American Art Museum

Smithsonian American Art Museum
Watch This! Revelations in Media Art presents pioneering and contemporary artworks that trace the evolution of a continuously emerging medium. The exhibition celebrates artists who are engaged in a creative revolution—one shaped as much by developments in science and technology as by style or medium—and explores the pervasive interdependence between technology and contemporary culture. The exhibition includes 44 objects from 1941 to 2013, which were acquired by the museum as part of its longstanding commitment to collecting and exhibiting media art. On view at the Smithsonian American Art Museum in Washington, DC from April 24, 2015 – September 7, 2015. http://americanart.si.edu/watchthis

American Art in a Global Context: North American Crosscurrents

Smithsonian American Art Museum
Symposium: "American Art in a Global Context" Friday, September 29, 2006 Session V: North American Crosscurrents Moderator: Henry Estrada, Smithsonian Latino Center Presenters: Gabriel Pérez-Barreiro, Blanton Museum of Art, "America/Americas: Placing U.S. Art in a Hemispheric Context" Frances Pohl, Pomona College, "Revisiting the Relationship between Canadian and American Art and Culture" Keith Morrison, Tyler School of Art, Temple University, "From Jamaica to New York: The Artist as a Citizen of the World" This three-day symposium looked at American art in a global context—from circum-Atlantic migrations in the eighteenth century to European training and travel in the late nineteenth century; from the export of U.S. culture and media in the twentieth century to the impact of immigration and globalization on the nation's visual arts in the new millennium. For more information: http://www.americanart.si.edu/research/symposia/2006/.

The Singing and the Silence: Birds in Contemporary Art - Smithsonian American Art Museum

Smithsonian American Art Museum
"The Singing and the Silence: Birds in Contemporary Art" examines mankind’s relationship to birds and the natural world through the eyes of twelve major contemporary American artists, including David Beck, Rachel Berwick, Lorna Bieber, Barbara Bosworth, Joann Brennan, Petah Coyne, Walton Ford, Paula McCartney, James Prosek, Laurel Roth Hope, Fred Tomaselli, and Tom Uttech. http://americanart.si.edu/exhibitions/archive/2014/birds/

Picture This: Slow Art at American Art

Smithsonian American Art Museum
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Reframing American Art

Smithsonian American Art Museum
A photograph of a woman standing in front of a sculpture of a bisonA new web series explores American art by making unexpected connections across the Smithsonian

“Chiura Obata: American Modern” at the Smithsonian American Art Museum

Smithsonian American Art Museum
Chiura Obata ranks among the most significant California-based artists and Japanese American cultural leaders of the last century. Born in Okayama, Japan, Obata immigrated to San Francisco as a teenager in 1903. By then, he was integrating Western practices into his art-making, and continued experimenting with new styles and methods throughout his seven-decade career. As a professor at University of California, Berkeley, and a founder of the East West Art Society, a Bay Area artists’ collective, he facilitated cross-cultural dialogue, despite widespread prejudice against Asian Americans. In 1942, when World War II fears and Executive Order 9066 forced Obata and more than one hundred thousand West Coast Japanese Americans into incarceration camps scattered across the western United States, he created art schools in the camps to help fellow prisoners cope with their displacement and loss. After the war, Obata returned to his callings as a painter, teacher, and cultural ambassador with scars that brought new emotional force to his work.

“Artists Respond: American Art and the Vietnam War, 1965-1975” at Smithsonian American Art Museum

Smithsonian American Art Museum
"Artists Respond: American Art and the Vietnam War, 1965-1975" examines the contemporary impact of the Vietnam War on American art and brings together nearly 100 works by fifty-eight of the most visionary and provocative artists of the period. Listen to Melissa Ho, curator of 20th century art, talk about "Artists Respond" at the Smithsonian American Art Museum.

The Civil War and American Art - Exhibition Trailer

Smithsonian American Art Museum
"The Civil War and American Art" is on view at the Smithsonian American Art Museum from November 16, 2012 through April 28, 2013. Visit http://www.americanart.si.edu/exhibitions/archive/2012/art_civil_war/ for more information.

East-West Interchanges in American Art: Eunyoung Cho

Smithsonian American Art Museum
Eunyoung Cho, associate professor of art history, Wonkwang University, Iksan, South Korea "Teaching American Art in East Asia" "A Long and Tumultuous Relationship" East-West Interchanges in American Art October 1--2, 2009 This two-day symposium at the Smithsonian American Art Museum explored the complicated interactions between American and Asian artists and visual traditions from the eighteenth century to the present. The history of American art has long been discussed primarily in terms of European training and influence. When scholars have looked eastward, they often have considered the Asian influence on art of the United States as a unidirectional and limited development, suggesting that Asian culture was monolithic and unchanging while characterizing American artists as dynamic and original in their ability to absorb and meld the best of diverse global outlooks. For more information, visit the website: http://www.americanart.si.edu/research/symposia/2009/

East-West Interchanges in American Art: Ding Ning

Smithsonian American Art Museum
Ding Ning, professor of art history and theory, Peking University, Beijing "Tropes and Achievements: Some Cases of the Mutual Chinese-American Influence in Art" "A Long and Tumultuous Relationship" East-West Interchanges in American Art October 1--2, 2009 This two-day symposium at the Smithsonian American Art Museum explored the complicated interactions between American and Asian artists and visual traditions from the eighteenth century to the present. The history of American art has long been discussed primarily in terms of European training and influence. When scholars have looked eastward, they often have considered the Asian influence on art of the United States as a unidirectional and limited development, suggesting that Asian culture was monolithic and unchanging while characterizing American artists as dynamic and original in their ability to absorb and meld the best of diverse global outlooks. For more information, visit the website: http://www.americanart.si.edu/research/symposia/2009/

East-West Interchanges in American Art: Jacquelynn Baas

Smithsonian American Art Museum
Jacquelynn Baas, emeritus director, University of California Berkeley Art Museum. "Before Zen: The Nothing of American Dada" "A Long and Tumultuous Relationship" East-West Interchanges in American Art October 1--2, 2009 This two-day symposium at the Smithsonian American Art Museum explored the complicated interactions between American and Asian artists and visual traditions from the eighteenth century to the present. The history of American art has long been discussed primarily in terms of European training and influence. When scholars have looked eastward, they often have considered the Asian influence on art of the United States as a unidirectional and limited development, suggesting that Asian culture was monolithic and unchanging while characterizing American artists as dynamic and original in their ability to absorb and meld the best of diverse global outlooks. For more information, visit the website: http://www.americanart.si.edu/research/symposia/2009/

East-West Interchanges in American Art: Jennifer Way

Smithsonian American Art Museum
Jennifer Way, associate professor of art history, University of North Texas "'Gold Mine in Southeast Asia': Russel Wright, Vietnamese Handicraft, and Transnational Consumption" "A Long and Tumultuous Relationship" East-West Interchanges in American Art October 1--2, 2009 This two-day symposium at the Smithsonian American Art Museum explored the complicated interactions between American and Asian artists and visual traditions from the eighteenth century to the present. The history of American art has long been discussed primarily in terms of European training and influence. When scholars have looked eastward, they often have considered the Asian influence on art of the United States as a unidirectional and limited development, suggesting that Asian culture was monolithic and unchanging while characterizing American artists as dynamic and original in their ability to absorb and meld the best of diverse global outlooks. For more information, visit the website: http://www.americanart.si.edu/research/symposia/2009/

East-West Interchanges in American Art: Partha Mitter

Smithsonian American Art Museum
Partha Mitter, emeritus professor of art history, University of Sussex "India and America: Mutual Perceptions in the Contact Zone" "A Long and Tumultuous Relationship" East-West Interchanges in American Art October 1--2, 2009 This two-day symposium at the Smithsonian American Art Museum explored the complicated interactions between American and Asian artists and visual traditions from the eighteenth century to the present. The history of American art has long been discussed primarily in terms of European training and influence. When scholars have looked eastward, they often have considered the Asian influence on art of the United States as a unidirectional and limited development, suggesting that Asian culture was monolithic and unchanging while characterizing American artists as dynamic and original in their ability to absorb and meld the best of diverse global outlooks. For more information, visit the website: http://www.americanart.si.edu/research/symposia/2009/

East-West Interchanges in American Art: J.M. Mancini

Smithsonian American Art Museum
J. M. Mancini, lecturer, National University of Ireland Maynooth "Destructive Creation: Instrumental Aesthetics and Geopolitical Relations in the American-Occupied Philippines" "A Long and Tumultuous Relationship" East-West Interchanges in American Art October 1--2, 2009 This two-day symposium at the Smithsonian American Art Museum explored the complicated interactions between American and Asian artists and visual traditions from the eighteenth century to the present. The history of American art has long been discussed primarily in terms of European training and influence. When scholars have looked eastward, they often have considered the Asian influence on art of the United States as a unidirectional and limited development, suggesting that Asian culture was monolithic and unchanging while characterizing American artists as dynamic and original in their ability to absorb and meld the best of diverse global outlooks. For more information, visit the website: http://www.americanart.si.edu/research/symposia/2009/

East-West Interchanges in American Art: Hiroko Ikegami

Smithsonian American Art Museum
Hiroko Ikegami, assistant professor, Faculty of Human Sciences, Osaka University "ROCI in East: Considering Rauschenberg's Agency in China" "A Long and Tumultuous Relationship" East-West Interchanges in American Art October 1--2, 2009 This two-day symposium at the Smithsonian American Art Museum explored the complicated interactions between American and Asian artists and visual traditions from the eighteenth century to the present. The history of American art has long been discussed primarily in terms of European training and influence. When scholars have looked eastward, they often have considered the Asian influence on art of the United States as a unidirectional and limited development, suggesting that Asian culture was monolithic and unchanging while characterizing American artists as dynamic and original in their ability to absorb and meld the best of diverse global outlooks. For more information, visit the website: http://www.americanart.si.edu/research/symposia/2009/

Lighting Techniques in the Smithsonian American Art Museum

Smithsonian American Art Museum
Time-lapse video showing lighting techniques used to light the gilded age galleries on view at the Smithsonian American Art Museum. By turning on lights one at a time, this video demonstrates how track lighting fixtures reveal the museum's art and architecture. The video shows how the lighting is built in layers: the first layer is a series of floodlights illumining the walls; next is a series of spotlights revealing the special qualities inherent in each artwork. The video concludes with a demonstration of how a series of lights are used in combination to illuminate a monumental sculpture with multiple narrow beam spotlights. The lighting equipment used in this gallery were: PAR30 halogen floodlights and PAR36 incandescent narrow beam spotlights. The Smithsonian American Art Museum is a leader in transitioning from these incandescent technologies to LED lighting. For more information on LEDs and exhibit lighting please see http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B1VQwYzbwXU
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