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Smithsonian American Art Museum

Smithsonian American Art Museum

African Art Museums

SI Center for Learning and Digital Access
List of museums in the United States with collections of African Art. Searchable by state.

Art museums form research council

Archives of American Art
1 clipping ; 15 x 7 cm.

Newspaper clipping announcing the formation of the American Art Research Council, its representatives, and description of the agency's goals.

Joslyn Art Museum

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
Joslyn Art Museum letterhead featuring graphic identity in blue at upper left, four overlapping circles arranged in pinwheel formation, two filled in with blue, two outlined in blue with white interior. Printed museum name in blue and black at upper left, address in black below.

Joslyn Art Museum

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
Joslyn Art Museum envelope featuring graphic identity in blue at upper left, four overlapping circles arranged in pinwheel formation, two filled in with blue, two outlined in blue with white interior. Printed address in black at upper left.

Renaming of African Art Museum, 1981

Smithsonian Archives - History Div
"National Museum of African Art." Smithsonian Institution Archives. Accessed June 28, 2016. http://siarchives.si.edu/history/national-museum-african-art.

In 1981, the Museum of African Art was renamed the National Museum of African Art to reflect its status as a newly acquired Smithsonian museum.

American Art Museum

Smithsonian Institution
American Art Museum - Captured Live on Ustream at http://www.ustream.tv/channel/american-art-museum

Smithsonian American Art Museum

Smithsonian American Art Museum
Explore a "day in the life" of the Smithsonian American Art Museum, the nation's first collection of American art and home to one of the largest and most inclusive collections of American art in the world. Located in the heart of the Washington DC, the museum offers an array of programs, tours, concerts, and special exhibitions inspired by the dynamic character and imagination of America's people and artists. AmericanArt.si.edu @americanart 8th and G Streets, NW Washington, DC Produced by: Smithsonian American Art Museum Betsy Broun The Margaret and Terry Stent Director Smithsonian American Art Museum Video Production: Zack Frank, Carlos Parada and Becky Harlan Music by: Dexter Britain http://dexterbritain.co.uk/ All Rights Reserved. © 2013

Woman in an art museum

National Museum of American History

Grand Rapids Art Museum

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
Poster depicts three different drawings of ceiling decorations on a maroon background. Above, in white: GRAND RAPIDS ART MUSEUM.

Grand Rapids Art Museum

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
Poster depicts a vertical rectangle containing a line drawing of the upper story of a building’s façade, focusing on the decorative elements: an eagle (under which some pigeons are perched), shutters, a lunette over the door; background is blue. Above, in white: GRAND RAPIDS ART MUSEUM.

Patent Office Building Exterior, Home of Smithsonian American Art Museum

Smithsonian Archives - History Div
National Collection of Fine Arts' flag that is flying was designed in 1965, so this image is post-1965. Date of exhibit on posters in front of museum is not legible.

The National Collection of Fine Arts (NCFA), now known as the Smithsonian American Art Museum, is located on this side of the Old Patent Office Building at 8th and G Streets, N.W. The National Portrait Gallery is located on the opposite side (not shown in photograph). The Old Patent Office building is a Greek Revival structure, built (1836-66) by Robert Mills and became home to the National Collection of Fine Arts (NCFA) in 1968. In 1980, NCFA was renamed the National Museum of American Art (NMAA), and then in 2000 it became known as the Smithsonian American Art Museum (SAAM).

Conversation Pieces: The Value of Dialogue in Art Museums

Smithsonian American Art Museum
ThumbnailJoanna Marsh, Senior Curator of Contemporary Interpretation, fills us in on the theory behind Conversation Pieces, a discussion-based public program that takes place monthly in SAAM's galleries.

June Wayne, Cincinnati Art Museum

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
Poster for the Cincinnati Art Museum exhibition, "Lithographs by June Wayne: A Retrospective," in September of 1969. Poster depicts an abstract drawing of black and white design of rounded forms with patterns against a black ground. The image is a version of Wayne's earlier print, "Target" which wad produced in February 1951. Above, in red, script text over a tan-colored, horizontal band: Cincinnati Art museum; below, in black, script text: June Wayne. Lower left, under the left corner of the black and white image: the target ’51 [monogram].

Art Museum or Pavilion

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
Rectangular structure with open areas, four large pennants hanging from tall poles in front.

American Art Museum Helping Out in Haiti

Smithsonian American Art Museum

Night at the American Art Museum

Smithsonian American Art Museum

William Henry Holmes and Art Museum Staff, 1929

Smithsonian Archives - History Div
Negative Number 18052-A, has an identical rear view of staffers.

Dr. Holmes had lost his leg and is standing behind the bench.

National Gallery of Art, now the Smithsonian American Art Museum, staff view the Ranger Exhibit in the Natural History Building, December 10, 1929. Standing behind wooden bench, foreground, facing camera are William H. Holmes, Director, and Louise A. Rosenbusch, recorder. Helen H. Hogan, clerk, is seated and Glenn L. Martin, gallery attendant, sits at the desk, on the far right.

William Henry Holmes and Art Museum Staff, 1929

Smithsonian Archives - History Div
On the original print, part of Holmes's missing leg has been colored in, the negative is unaltered. Folder 4 has other photos of this event and photos of Ranger art.

At the Natural History Building, the staff of the National Gallery of Art, now the National Museum of American Art, views the Ranger Exhibit in the Natural History Building, December 10, 1929. Standing behind wooden bench, foreground, is William Henry Holmes, Director, and Louise A. Rosenbusch, Recorder. Helen H. Hogan, clerk, is seated and Glenn L. Martin, Gallery attendant, sits at desk, far right.

Self-Reflection at the Museum of Modern Art

Smithsonian American Art Museum
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