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ʻAe Kai: A Culture Lab on Convergence

Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Program
A weekend-long creative experience featuring 50+ artists, scholars and cultural practitioners from Hawaiʻi, the Pacific Islands and beyond 🏄🏾 Details: http://smithsonianapa.org/aekai The Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center is pleased to present ʻAe Kai: A Culture Lab on Convergence on July 7-9, 2017 in Honolulu, Hawaiʻi. ʻAe Kai will take place in the former site of Foodland in Ala Moana Center, an 18,000 sq ft supermarket situated in the neighborhood between Waikiki and Kaka‘ako, and will explore the meeting points of humanity and nature in Hawaiʻi, the Pacific Islands and beyond. Following 2016’s transformational culture labs – CrossLines in Washington, D.C. and CTRL+ALT in New York City – ‘Ae Kai will continue SmithsonianAPA's practice of community building through curated artmaking. The biggest Culture Lab to date, most of ‘Ae Kai’s participants are based or rooted in Hawaiʻi, with the majority of artists identifying as Pacific Islanders. FEATURING: AARON KAWAI’AE’A w/ TAVANA Acrylic works with traditional & modern themes ABIGAIL KAHILIKIA ROMANCHAK w/ CHARLES COHAN Traditional printmaking with a contemporary vision ADAM LABUEN w/ ALEX ABALOS Work that blends science and fantastical portraiture ADRIENNE KEAHI PAO Photography exploring fantasy & identity ALOHA GOT SOUL Excavating rare & forgotten Hawaiian music ANGEL CHANG Fashion inspired by rural Chinese handweaving BRANDY NĀLANI MCDOUGALL Tracing indigeneity & colonialism through bilingual poetry CALVIN HOE Mahi ʻAi Kalo (taro farmer) & artisan CARL FRANKLIN KA’AILĀ’AU PAO Multidisciplinary art exploring kaona and wā CHAD SHOMURA w/ LINH HUỲNH Experiments in stranger intimacy CHARLES PHILIPPE JEAN-PIERRE Paintings & illustrations that contrast perception & reality CHELOVE DC-based street art investigating indigeneity today CRAIG SANTOS PEREZ Poetic bridges from Guam to Hawaiʻi to California DR. KEANU SAI Complicating the Hawaiian kingdom's historical narrative HAVANA LIBRE Uncovering Cuba's hidden surf culture JAHRA ‘RAGER’ WASASALA Movement & poetry rooted in New Zealand & Fiji JESS X. SNOW, KIT YAN & PETER PA Queer Asian American storytelling through visual poetry JOCELYN KAPUMEALANI NG Special effects & poetry with a fascination with the dark JOHN “PRIME” HINA Hawaiian storytelling through street art KATELIN LILI’INOE BRANCO Illustrations inspired by animal/human/environmental interactions KATHY JETÑIL-KIJINER Poetry & performance exploring life in the Marshall Islands KAYLA BRIËT Film & music based on Native American traditions & futures KEALOPIKO Contemporary fashion rooted in traditional Hawaiian practices LEHUA M. TAITANO Art & poetry exploring queer Chamoru identity LÉULI LUNAʻI ESHRĀGHI Multi-practice art centered on indigeneity & queer futures LISA JARRETT Comparing Self & Other as an American Black woman LOW LEAF Bridging Los Angeles & the Philippines through DIY music MAIKA’I TUBBS Sculptures from found materials to explore consumption & ecology MAILE ANDRADE Multimedia exploring Native Hawaiian creative expression MASPAZ The power of typography & color through graffiti MAZI MUTAFA Hip hop as a tool for transformative learning MONICA JAHAN BOSE Collaborative fabric & printmaking to explore gender & climate change NAOKO WOWSUGI Reciprocal exchange between art & the world NICOLE A. MOORE The intersection of African American history & Hawaiʻi PŌHAKU STONE Revitalizing ancient surf & he'e hōlua (Hawaiian sledding) RICKY TAGABAN Material culture to explore traditional & contemporary Native Alaskan life ROSANNA RAYMOND Multi-disciplinary art focused on contemporary Pacific Island culture SHIZU SALDAMANDO Portraits about social constructs of identity & subcultures SID M. DUENAS Multi-platform art that challenges the effectiveness of language SLOANE LEONG Sci-fi & futurism from an Asian Latina Polynesian cartoonist SOLOMON ENOS Illustration/sculpture/painting depicting Hawaiian fantasy TERISA SIAGATONU Queer Samoan poetry & healing arts THE SURF PROFESSOR Crafting the Papa Heʻe Nalu (traditional native Hawaiian surfboard) WIENA LIN Sensory experiences about material culture & tech waste WOODEN WAVE Murals & illustrations that merge fantasy & sustainability

wining Cedar (3 of 15): Teachings from Tsimshian Master Weaver Lillian Buchert

Smithsonian Arctic Studies Center Alaska
Red cedar bark twined basketry is a distinctive Tsimshian art form. With the passing on of elder master artists and the demands of contemporary lifestyles, it became at risk. A handful of weavers today are working to master and revitalize twined cedarbark basketry, reconnecting with a proud heritage. In 2016, the Arctic Studies Center collaborated with The Haayk Foundation of Metlakatla to document the materials and techniques of cedarbark basketry. The project included a harvesting and processing workshop and a weaving workshop in Metlakatla, and a residency at the Arctic Studies Center in Anchorage where artists studied baskets from museum and private collections, practiced and refined weaving techniques, and taught museum visitors and school children about basketry. Teaching was led by Haida master weaver Delores Churchill, who learned from master Tsimshian weaver Flora Mather, with assistance from her daughter Holly Churchill, an accomplished weaver. In addition to Metlakatla students, three advanced Tsimshian weavers participated in the project, sharing techniques learned in their families and communities and learning new ones: Kandi McGilton (co-founder of The Haayk Foundation), Karla Booth (granddaughter of Tsimshian master weaver Violet Booth) and Annette Topham (niece of master Tsimshian weaver Lillian Buchert). Metlakatla elder Sarah Booth, a fluent speaker of Sm’algyax (Ts’msyen), assisted Kandi McGilton in documenting indigenous basketry terminology for use in language classes. The videos presented here, with footage from the workshops and residency, provide instruction on how to harvest and process materials and on how to weave a basket from start to finish. To learn more about Tsimshian culture, please visit the website Sharing Knowledge at /http://alaska.si.edu, where you will find information about all Alaska Native cultures and educational materials in the Resources section.

Zitkala-sa

National Portrait Gallery
Zitkala-Sa was a pioneer in a generation of Indian rights activists who had graduated from mission and government schools, where children were forbidden from speaking their indigenous native languages. Working together, these intellectual activists representing various tribal backgrounds used their formal educations and flawless English to fight U.S. federal Indian policy and demand social justice. At ease in mainstream and urban (i.e., white) society, they formed professional organizations. For example, the Society of American Indians, founded in 1907, was the first national all-Indian organization to advocate for Indian rights. As one of its leaders, Zitkala-Sa tirelessly fought for Native American citizenship rights, and she was described as “a Jeanne D’Arc to lead her people into citizenship.” Zitkala-Sa later founded one of the most important Native rights organizations, the National Council of American Indians.

Zitkala-Sa fue pionera de una generación de activistas indígenas graduadas de escuelas misioneras o del gobierno, donde se les había prohibido hablar sus lenguas nativas. Unidas, estas activistas intelectuales, representantes de trasfondos tribales diversos, utilizaron su educación formal y su inglés impecable para combatir la política federal respecto a los indígenas y exigir justicia social. Sabiendo desenvolverse en la sociedad tradicional urbana (i.e., blanca), formaron organizaciones profesionales. Una de ellas, la Sociedad de Indígenas Americanos, creada en 1907, fue la primera organización nacional plenamente indígena que abogó por los derechos de estos pueblos. Zitkala-Sa fue una de sus líderes y luchó tenazmente por los derechos ciudadanos de los nativos americanos, siendo descrita como “una Juana de Arco que lidera a su pueblo hacia la ciudadanía”. Luego fundó otra de las principales organizaciones nativas, el Concilio Nacional de Indígenas Americanos.

Zebras of the Arctic: 7 Questions and Answers

National Museum of the American Indian
When the Saint Louis Zoo began to develop the interpretation for the McDonnell Polar Bear Point exhibition, along came a new opportunity to discuss climate change with their audiences. "Zebras in the Arctic" presents the connections and results of the journey the zoo took in coming to a First Voices approach to understanding and interpreting the significance of polar bears in the Arctic, which includes their collaboration with Smithsonian’s Arctic Studies Center and the Alaska Nanuuq Commission. In this segment, the symposium presenters respond to questions from the audience. This program was webcast and recorded at the National Museum of the American Indian in Washington, D.C. on July 21, 2017.

Zebras of the Arctic: 6 Kelly Kapsar

National Museum of the American Indian
When the Saint Louis Zoo began to develop the interpretation for the McDonnell Polar Bear Point exhibition, along came a new opportunity to discuss climate change with their audiences. "Zebras in the Arctic" presents the connections and results of the journey the zoo took in coming to a First Voices approach to understanding and interpreting the significance of polar bears in the Arctic, which includes their collaboration with Smithsonian’s Arctic Studies Center and the Alaska Nanuuq Commission. In this segment, Kelly Kapsar speaks on "Branching Out From the McDonnell Polar Bear Point Project," which features a special preview of a of community produced video from Gambell, Saint Lawrence Island, Alaska. Kelly Kaspar became involved with the Zebras in the Arctic project when she visited Gambell and Savoonga, Alaska, as a part of her work at the Saint Louis Zoo. Currently, she is a Ph.D. student in the Center for Systems Integration and Sustainability at Michigan State University. Her research focuses on human and natural systems in the Arctic and their connections to lower latitudes. This program was webcast and recorded at the National Museum of the American Indian in Washington, D.C. on July 21, 2017.

Zebras of the Arctic: 5 Lisa Lidgus

National Museum of the American Indian
When the Saint Louis Zoo began to develop the interpretation for the McDonnell Polar Bear Point exhibition, along came a new opportunity to discuss climate change with their audiences. "Zebras in the Arctic" presents the connections and results of the journey the zoo took in coming to a First Voices approach to understanding and interpreting the significance of polar bears in the Arctic, which includes their collaboration with Smithsonian’s Arctic Studies Center and the Alaska Nanuuq Commission. In this segment, Lisa Lidgus speaks on "Uncharted Territory: A Zoo’s Attempt At Creating Meaningful, Personal Connections Through First Voices Interpretation," and describes the process for creating video journals and the state of interpretation at the McDonnell Polar Bear Point exhibition at the Saint Louis Zoo. Her presentation includes a short community produced video from Prince of Wales, Alaska. Lisa Lidgus is a Conservation Education Liaison and has worked at the Saint Louis Zoo for 16 years. With a B.A. in Zoology, her background in both conservation education and animal husbandry led her into the field of exhibit design. This work began in 2014 by engaging teachers and students in Alaska Native villages on behalf of this project. She has since transitioned to managing the partnerships between the Zoo and our Alaska Native partners. This program was webcast and recorded at the National Museum of the American Indian in Washington, D.C. on July 21, 2017.

Zebras of the Arctic: 4 Jack Omelak

National Museum of the American Indian
When the Saint Louis Zoo began to develop the interpretation for the McDonnell Polar Bear Point exhibition, along came a new opportunity to discuss climate change with their audiences. "Zebras in the Arctic" presents the connections and results of the journey the zoo took in coming to a First Voices approach to understanding and interpreting the significance of polar bears in the Arctic, which includes their collaboration with Smithsonian’s Arctic Studies Center and the Alaska Nanuuq Commission. In this segment, Jack Omelak is videoconferenced from Nome, Alaska, to speak on "Avoiding Cognitive Imperialism and the Organic Approach," which addresses Alaska Native partners' perspective in the development and implementation of video journals and the partnership between the Saint Louis Zoo and the Alaska Nanuuq Commission. Jack Omelak was born and raised in Nome, Alaska and has an undergraduate degree in Anthropology from the University of Oklahoma. For the past eight years he has been the Executive Director of the Alaska Nanuuq Commission. Appointed by Secretary Jewell in 2013, he represented the U.S. and Native people in high level international negotiations between the U.S. and Russia regarding polar bear management and policy. This program was webcast and recorded at the National Museum of the American Indian in Washington, D.C. on July 21, 2017.

Zebras of the Arctic: 3 Dr. Stephen Loring

National Museum of the American Indian
When the Saint Louis Zoo began to develop the interpretation for the McDonnell Polar Bear Point exhibition, along came a new opportunity to discuss climate change with their audiences. "Zebras in the Arctic" presents the connections and results of the journey the zoo took in coming to a First Voices approach to understanding and interpreting the significance of polar bears in the Arctic, which includes their collaboration with Smithsonian’s Arctic Studies Center and the Alaska Nanuuq Commission. In this segment, Dr. Stephen Loring speaks on "Nanook! The Mingled Destinies of Human Beings and Bears in the Arctic." Dr. Stephen Loring, Smithsonian’s National Museum of Natural History, is an Arctic Archaeologist and Museum Anthropologist with the Arctic Studies Center at the Smithsonian’s National Museum of Natural History. This program was webcast and recorded at the National Museum of the American Indian in Washington, D.C. on July 21, 2017.

Zebras of the Arctic: 2 Dr. Adrián Cerezo

National Museum of the American Indian
When the Saint Louis Zoo began to develop the interpretation for the McDonnell Polar Bear Point exhibition, along came a new opportunity to discuss climate change with their audiences. "Zebras in the Arctic" presents the connections and results of the journey the zoo took in coming to a First Voices approach to understanding and interpreting the significance of polar bears in the Arctic, which includes their collaboration with Smithsonian’s Arctic Studies Center and the Alaska Nanuuq Commission. In this segment, Dr. Adrián Cerezo presents a history the McDonnell Polar Bear Point exhibition, and the collaborations that emerged from the desire to take a First Voices approach to interpretation. Dr. Adrián Cerezo (Yale University) is a social ecologist, environmental scientist and human development researcher. His work interweaves scholarship and real-world practice to explore sustainable development in communities. Dr. Cerezo holds a Ph.D. with a focus on Social Ecology and Developmental Science from Yale University, where he is also a fellow at Zigler Center for Early Childhood Development Policy. He also serves as consultant for UNICEF global early childhood programs, and the City as a Living Laboratory project in New York, NY. This program was webcast and recorded at the National Museum of the American Indian in Washington, D.C. on July 21, 2017.

Zebras of the Arctic: 1 Blessing and Introduction, Emil Her Many Horses

National Museum of the American Indian
When the Saint Louis Zoo began to develop the interpretation for the McDonnell Polar Bear Point exhibition along came a new opportunity to discuss climate change with their audiences. "Zebras in the Arctic" presents the connections and results of the journey the zoo took in coming to a First Voices approach to understanding and interpreting the significance of polar bears in the Arctic, which includes their collaboration with Smithsonian’s Arctic Studies Center and the Alaska Nanuuq Commission. In this segment, Emil Her Many Horses (Lakota) gives a blessing for the proceedings and discusses the interpretative technique at the National Museum of the American Indian, which involves close collaboration with Native communities. Emil Her Many Horses (Lakota) is an associate curator, Museum Research and Scholarship, at NMAI. He specializes in the Central Plains cultures. Mr. Her Many Horses is a member of the Oglala Lakota nation of South Dakota and served as lead curator for the inaugural permanent exhibition, “Our Universes: Traditional Knowledge Shapes Our World”. This program was webcast and recorded at the National Museum of the American Indian in Washington, D.C. on July 21, 2017.

Young Girl and Ravens

National Museum of the American Indian

Yoke

National Museum of the American Indian

Yo-yo

National Museum of the American Indian

Yo-yo

National Museum of the American Indian

Yo-yo

National Museum of the American Indian

Yo-yo

National Museum of the American Indian

Yo-yo

National Museum of the American Indian

Yo-yo

National Museum of the American Indian

Yo-yo

National Museum of the American Indian

Yo-yo

National Museum of the American Indian

Yo-yo

National Museum of the American Indian

Yo-yo

National Museum of the American Indian

Yo-yo

National Museum of the American Indian

Yo-yo

National Museum of the American Indian
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