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Smithsonian Arctic Studies Center Alaska

Smithsonian Arctic Studies Center Alaska
In 1994, the Anchorage Museum became the Alaska home of the Smithsonian Institution’s Arctic Studies Center. Its exhibition Living Our Cultures, Sharing Our Heritage: The First Peoples of Alaska presents Indigenous voices, perspectives and knowledge through over 600 masterworks of Alaska Native art and design from the National Museum of Natural History and National Museum of the American Indian collections. Living Our Cultures serves as both a public exhibition and as an active resource for collaborative, community-based research and education. These programs have included artist residencies and language seminars with Alaska Native elders, culture-bearers and artists. The videos on this channel, filmed and edited from these programs, provide instructional and educational information about Alaska Native languages, arts and lifeways. Free DVD copies and teacher's guides with lessons and worksheets are available: please contact Dawn Biddison at biddisond@si.edu. Video music: Dance songs by Joe Sikvayunak; Barrow, 1954; courtesy of Smithsonian Folkways

Sewing Salmon 6 (of 10): Learning from Native Artists

Smithsonian Arctic Studies Center Alaska
The Sewing Salmon project – hosted by the Smithsonian Institution’s Arctic Studies Center at the Anchorage Museum in Alaska – brought together three contemporary Alaska Native artists to learn and teach about creating work from fish skin through studying historic fishskin objects and through sharing and comparing techniques they developed. Each artist has a commitment to this almost-lost art and shared their knowledge with students and visitors, and with curators and conservators who care for museum collections. For free curriculum on salmon in Alaska, including lessons with answers for teachers, see the about section to contact us. To learn more about Alaska Native cultures, please visit the website Sharing Knowledge at http://alaska.si.edu.

Jerome Saclamana: Iñupiaq artist

Smithsonian Arctic Studies Center Alaska
Meet Alaska Native artist Jerome Saclamana, an Iñupiaq carver from Nome

Sewing Salmon 7 (of 10): Answers from the Artists

Smithsonian Arctic Studies Center Alaska
The Sewing Salmon project – hosted by the Smithsonian Institution’s Arctic Studies Center at the Anchorage Museum in Alaska – brought together three contemporary Alaska Native artists to learn and teach about creating work from fish skin through studying historic fishskin objects and through sharing and comparing techniques they developed. Each artist has a commitment to this almost-lost art and shared their knowledge with students and visitors, and with curators and conservators who care for museum collections. For free curriculum on salmon in Alaska, including lessons with answers for teachers, see the about section to contact us. To learn more about Alaska Native cultures, please visit the website Sharing Knowledge at http://alaska.si.edu.

Sewing Salmon 9 (of 10): Meet Coral Chernoff

Smithsonian Arctic Studies Center Alaska
The Sewing Salmon project – hosted by the Smithsonian Institution’s Arctic Studies Center at the Anchorage Museum in Alaska – brought together three contemporary Alaska Native artists to learn and teach about creating work from fish skin through studying historic fishskin objects and through sharing and comparing techniques they developed. Each artist has a commitment to this almost-lost art and shared their knowledge with students and visitors, and with curators and conservators who care for museum collections. For free curriculum on salmon in Alaska, including lessons with answers for teachers, see the about section to contact us. To learn more about Alaska Native cultures, please visit the website Sharing Knowledge at http://alaska.si.edu.

Sewing Salmon 10 (of 10): Meet Marlene Nielsen

Smithsonian Arctic Studies Center Alaska
The Sewing Salmon project – hosted by the Smithsonian Institution’s Arctic Studies Center at the Anchorage Museum in Alaska – brought together three contemporary Alaska Native artists to learn and teach about creating work from fish skin through studying historic fishskin objects and through sharing and comparing techniques they developed. Each artist has a commitment to this almost-lost art and shared their knowledge with students and visitors, and with curators and conservators who care for museum collections. For free curriculum on salmon in Alaska, including lessons with answers for teachers, see the about section to contact us. To learn more about Alaska Native cultures, please visit the website Sharing Knowledge at http://alaska.si.edu.

Sewing Salmon 8 (of 10): Meet Audrey Armstrong

Smithsonian Arctic Studies Center Alaska
The Sewing Salmon project – hosted by the Smithsonian Institution’s Arctic Studies Center at the Anchorage Museum in Alaska – brought together three contemporary Alaska Native artists to learn and teach about creating work from fish skin through studying historic fishskin objects and through sharing and comparing techniques they developed. Each artist has a commitment to this almost-lost art and shared their knowledge with students and visitors, and with curators and conservators who care for museum collections. For free curriculum on salmon in Alaska, including lessons with answers for teachers, see the about section to contact us. To learn more about Alaska Native cultures, please visit the website Sharing Knowledge at http://alaska.si.edu.

Sewing Salmon 5 (of 10): Stitching Salmon Skin

Smithsonian Arctic Studies Center Alaska
The Sewing Salmon project – hosted by the Smithsonian Institution’s Arctic Studies Center at the Anchorage Museum in Alaska – brought together three contemporary Alaska Native artists to learn and teach about creating work from fish skin through studying historic fishskin objects and through sharing and comparing techniques they developed. Each artist has a commitment to this almost-lost art and shared their knowledge with students and visitors, and with curators and conservators who care for museum collections. For free curriculum on salmon in Alaska, including lessons with answers for teachers, see the about section to contact us. To learn more about Alaska Native cultures, please visit the website Sharing Knowledge at http://alaska.si.edu.

Sewing Salmon 4 (of 10): Marlene Nielsen's Method

Smithsonian Arctic Studies Center Alaska
The Sewing Salmon project – hosted by the Smithsonian Institution’s Arctic Studies Center at the Anchorage Museum in Alaska – brought together three contemporary Alaska Native artists to learn and teach about creating work from fish skin through studying historic fishskin objects and through sharing and comparing techniques they developed. Each artist has a commitment to this almost-lost art and shared their knowledge with students and visitors, and with curators and conservators who care for museum collections. For free curriculum on salmon in Alaska, including lessons with answers for teachers, see the about section to contact us. To learn more about Alaska Native cultures, please visit the website Sharing Knowledge at http://alaska.si.edu.

Sewing Salmon 3 (of 10): Coral Chernoff's Method

Smithsonian Arctic Studies Center Alaska
The Sewing Salmon project – hosted by the Smithsonian Institution’s Arctic Studies Center at the Anchorage Museum in Alaska – brought together three contemporary Alaska Native artists to learn and teach about creating work from fish skin through studying historic fishskin objects and through sharing and comparing techniques they developed. Each artist has a commitment to this almost-lost art and shared their knowledge with students and visitors, and with curators and conservators who care for museum collections. For free curriculum on salmon in Alaska, including lessons with answers for teachers, see the about section to contact us. To learn more about Alaska Native cultures, please visit the website Sharing Knowledge at http://alaska.si.edu.

Sewing Salmon 1 (of 10): Introduction

Smithsonian Arctic Studies Center Alaska
The Sewing Salmon project – hosted by the Smithsonian Institution’s Arctic Studies Center at the Anchorage Museum in Alaska – brought together three contemporary Alaska Native artists to learn and teach about creating work from fish skin through studying historic fishskin objects and through sharing and comparing techniques they developed. Each artist has a commitment to this almost-lost art and shared their knowledge with students and visitors, and with curators and conservators who care for museum collections. For free curriculum on salmon in Alaska, including lessons with answers for teachers, see the about section to contact us. To learn more about Alaska Native cultures, please visit the website Sharing Knowledge at http://alaska.si.edu.

Sewing Salmon 2 (of 10): Audrey Armstrong's Method

Smithsonian Arctic Studies Center Alaska
The Sewing Salmon project – hosted by the Smithsonian Institution’s Arctic Studies Center at the Anchorage Museum in Alaska – brought together three contemporary Alaska Native artists to learn and teach about creating work from fish skin through studying historic fishskin objects and through sharing and comparing techniques they developed. Each artist has a commitment to this almost-lost art and shared their knowledge with students and visitors, and with curators and conservators who care for museum collections. For free curriculum on salmon in Alaska, including lessons with answers for teachers, see the about section to contact us. To learn more about Alaska Native cultures, please visit the website Sharing Knowledge at http://alaska.si.edu.

Creating Quillwork 8 (of 8): Meet the Conservators

Smithsonian Arctic Studies Center Alaska
During the Dene Quill Art project, two Athabascan artists and an ethnographic conservator shared quillwork techniques and develop new ones by studying historic museum objects. They shared their expertise with students, conservators and museum visitors. These educational videos provide detailed demonstrations of how to work with quill from cleaning and dying, to sewing, wrapping folding and weaving. For free curriculum on Athabascan peoples, including lessons with answers fro teachers, see the about section to contact us. To learn more about Athabascan culture, please visit the website Sharing Knowledge at /http://alaska.si.edu, where you will find information about all Alaska Native cultures and educational materials in the Resources section.

Creating Quillwork 6 (of 8): Weaving

Smithsonian Arctic Studies Center Alaska
During the Dene Quill Art project, two Athabascan artists and an ethnographic conservator shared quillwork techniques and develop new ones by studying historic museum objects. They shared their expertise with students, conservators and museum visitors. These educational videos provide detailed demonstrations of how to work with quill from cleaning and dying, to sewing, wrapping folding and weaving. For free curriculum on Athabascan peoples, including lessons with answers for teachers, see the about section to contact us. To learn more about Athabascan culture, please visit the website Sharing Knowledge at /http://alaska.si.edu, where you will find information about all Alaska Native cultures and educational materials in the Resources section.

Creating Quillwork 2 (of 8): Materials & Preparation

Smithsonian Arctic Studies Center Alaska
During the Dene Quill Art project, two Athabascan artists and an ethnographic conservator shared quillwork techniques and develop new ones by studying historic museum objects. They shared their expertise with students, conservators and museum visitors. These educational videos provide detailed demonstrations of how to work with quill from cleaning and dying, to sewing, wrapping folding and weaving. For free curriculum on Athabascan peoples, including lessons with answers for teachers, see the about section to contact us. To learn more about Athabascan culture, please visit the website Sharing Knowledge at /http://alaska.si.edu, where you will find information about all Alaska Native cultures and educational materials in the Resources section.

Creating Quillwork 4 (of 8): Folding and Wrapping

Smithsonian Arctic Studies Center Alaska
During the Dene Quill Art project, two Athabascan artists and an ethnographic conservator shared quillwork techniques and develop new ones by studying historic museum objects. They shared their expertise with students, conservators and museum visitors. These educational videos provide detailed demonstrations of how to work with quill from cleaning and dying, to sewing, wrapping folding and weaving. For free curriculum on Athabascan peoples, including lessons with answers for teachers, see the about section to contact us. To learn more about Athabascan culture, please visit the website Sharing Knowledge at /http://alaska.si.edu, where you will find information about all Alaska Native cultures and educational materials in the Resources section.

Creating Quillwork 1 (of 8): Introduction

Smithsonian Arctic Studies Center Alaska
During the Dene Quill Art project, two Athabascan artists and an ethnographic conservator shared quillwork techniques and develop new ones by studying historic museum objects. They shared their expertise with students, conservators and museum visitors. These educational videos provide detailed demonstrations of how to work with quill from cleaning and dying, to sewing, wrapping folding and weaving. For free curriculum on Athabascan peoples, including lessons with answers for teachers, see the about section to contact us. To learn more about Athabascan culture, please visit the website Sharing Knowledge at /http://alaska.si.edu, where you will find information about all Alaska Native cultures and educational materials in the Resources section.

Creating Quillwork 3 (of 8): Dyeing Quills

Smithsonian Arctic Studies Center Alaska
During the Dene Quill Art project, two Athabascan artists and an ethnographic conservator shared quillwork techniques and develop new ones by studying historic museum objects. They shared their expertise with students, conservators and museum visitors. These educational videos provide detailed demonstrations of how to work with quill from cleaning and dying, to sewing, wrapping folding and weaving. For free curriculum on Athabascan peoples, including lessons with answers for teachers, see the about section to contact us. To learn more about Athabascan culture, please visit the website Sharing Knowledge at /http://alaska.si.edu, where you will find information about all Alaska Native cultures and educational materials in the Resources section.

Creating Quillwork 5 (of 8): Edging

Smithsonian Arctic Studies Center Alaska
During the Dene Quill Art project, two Athabascan artists and an ethnographic conservator shared quillwork techniques and develop new ones by studying historic museum objects. They shared their expertise with students, conservators and museum visitors. These educational videos provide detailed demonstrations of how to work with quill from cleaning and dying, to sewing, wrapping folding and weaving. For free curriculum on Athabascan peoples, including lessons with answers for teachers, see the about section to contact us. To learn more about Athabascan culture, please visit the website Sharing Knowledge at /http://alaska.si.edu, where you will find information about all Alaska Native cultures and educational materials in the Resources section.

Creating Quillwork 7 (of 8): Meet the Artists

Smithsonian Arctic Studies Center Alaska
During the Dene Quill Art project, two Athabascan artists and an ethnographic conservator shared quillwork techniques and develop new ones by studying historic museum objects. They shared their expertise with students, conservators and museum visitors. These educational videos provide detailed demonstrations of how to work with quill from cleaning and dying, to sewing, wrapping folding and weaving. For free curriculum on Athabascan peoples, including lessons with answers for teachers, see the about section to contact us. To learn more about Athabascan culture, please visit the website Sharing Knowledge at /http://alaska.si.edu, where you will find information about all Alaska Native cultures and educational materials in the Resources section.

Listen & Learn SLI Yupik (11 of 12): Aaraaghusik Iiggak (Fancy Gloves)

Smithsonian Arctic Studies Center Alaska
The Arctic Studies Center hosted a St. Lawrence Island Yupik language and culture seminar at the Anchorage Museum in January 2012, bringing together seven fluent speakers for five days to discuss Yupik objects in the Living Our Cultures exhibition. The goals were to contribute to documentation of the Yupik language and to create language and culture teaching materials for use in schools and homes throughout Alaska and beyond. For a free educational guide with six lessons, including answers for teachers, see the about section to contact us. To learn more about Alaska Native cultures, please visit the website Sharing Knowledge at http://alaska.si.edu.

Listen & Learn SLI Yupik (5 of 12): Anavak (Bird Net)

Smithsonian Arctic Studies Center Alaska
The Arctic Studies Center hosted a St. Lawrence Island Yupik language and culture seminar at the Anchorage Museum in January 2012, bringing together seven fluent speakers for five days to discuss Yupik objects in the Living Our Cultures exhibition. The goals were to contribute to documentation of the Yupik language and to create language and culture teaching materials for use in schools and homes throughout Alaska and beyond. For a free educational guide with six lessons, including answers for teachers, see the about section to contact us. To learn more about Alaska Native cultures, please visit the website Sharing Knowledge at http://alaska.si.edu.

Listen & Learn SLI Yupik (9 of 12): Sanightaaq (Fancy Gut Parka)

Smithsonian Arctic Studies Center Alaska
The Arctic Studies Center hosted a St. Lawrence Island Yupik language and culture seminar at the Anchorage Museum in January 2012, bringing together seven fluent speakers for five days to discuss Yupik objects in the Living Our Cultures exhibition. The goals were to contribute to documentation of the Yupik language and to create language and culture teaching materials for use in schools and homes throughout Alaska and beyond. For a free educational guide with six lessons, including answers for teachers, see the about section to contact us. To learn more about Alaska Native cultures, please visit the website Sharing Knowledge at http://alaska.si.edu.

Listen & Learn SLI Yupik (4 of 12): Avleqaghtat (Bolas)

Smithsonian Arctic Studies Center Alaska
The Arctic Studies Center hosted a St. Lawrence Island Yupik language and culture seminar at the Anchorage Museum in January 2012, bringing together seven fluent speakers for five days to discuss Yupik objects in the Living Our Cultures exhibition. The goals were to contribute to documentation of the Yupik language and to create language and culture teaching materials for use in schools and homes throughout Alaska and beyond. For a free educational guide with six lessons, including answers for teachers, see the about section to contact us. To learn more about Alaska Native cultures, please visit the website Sharing Knowledge at http://alaska.si.edu.
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